Designate a qualified person or position with overall responsibility RMP is a management system, each role will have certain assigned responsibilities for individual requirements of the RMP There should be a commitment for facility management and the approach to managing the risks which should be implemented on an ongoing, and daily way of operation. Preparing to deal with any potential workplace injury requires an employer to develop an emergency response plan. Any emergency action plan should include the assignment of rescue and medical duties, either inside or outside the project site, the designation of assembly areas and procedures to account for employees, sites of alternative communication centers, and operation procedures and methods (alarm systems) to alert employees of an evacuation, which also includes the evacuation of disabled employees. An emergency action plan also should discuss the roles of the emergency response coordinator; specifically, the coordinator should have the ability to assess the situation and determine the extent and scope of the emergency that exists. Furthermore, the emergency action plan should include training to address every employee’s specific roles and responsibilities during an emergency evacuation or catastrophic event, including identifying the threats, hazards and protective actions that need to be taken, the notification warning and communication procedures that will be used, and the means of locating family members during any type of emergency.
Construction employers can effectively deal with workplace fatalities and catastrophic accidents, but only through proper planning and execution.
The National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure and supporting Action Plan establish a collaborative federal, provincial, territorial and critical infrastructure sector approach that will be used to strengthen critical infrastructure resiliency. This Action Plan will be updated regularly to enable partners to anticipate and address new risks. This Plan sets out action items in the areas of partnerships, risk management and information sharing. Work will be undertaken across all three elements of the Strategy (partnerships, risk management and information sharing).Within years one and two, partners will focus primarily on the development of sector networks and the National Cross-Sector Forum, as well as improved information sharing. The Action Plan recognizes that, in an emergency, the first response is almost always by the municipalities and at the provincial and territorial level because disasters occur most often locally and because provincial and territorial governments have responsibility for emergency management within their respective jurisdiction.
Consistent with the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure and the Emergency Management Framework for Canada, the following chart describes the roles and responsibilities for the Action Plan. The enormity and complexity of critical infrastructure, the interdependencies that cross sectors and jurisdictions, and the uncertain nature of risks and natural disasters make the effective implementation of protection efforts a great challenge. Key action: Sector networks will be established for each of the critical infrastructure sectors.
The National Cross-Sector Forum will also identify high priority and emerging issues and make relevant recommendations to the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management to address these issues.
Key action: The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management will develop the National Cross-Sector Forum, drawing membership from the chairs of each sector network. Key action: Renewal of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Critical Infrastructure Working Group.
Building on the sector networks,partners will turn their attention towards the development of an information sharing framework that will enable federal,provincial and territorial governments and critical infrastructure sectors to produce and share a wider and more timely range of information products, in full respect of existing federal,provincial and territorial legislation and policies.Ultimately, these improvements in information sharing will assist federal,provincial and territorial governments,and the critical infrastructure sectors,with risk management. Key action: Federal, provincial and territorial governments will collaborate to develop an information sharing framework. While partnerships and enhanced information sharing represent the building blocks of the Canadian approach to enhancing the resiliency of critical infrastructure, these cannot be undertaken in isolation of risk management and the development of plans and exercises to address these risks. Risk assessments of critical infrastructure in Canada: Sector networks will develop risk profiles in cooperation with governments and the private sector. Although the Strategy promotes a common approach to enhancing the resiliency of critical infrastructure, owners and operators and all governments are ultimately responsible for implementing a risk management approach appropriate to their situation. The success of these efforts, in particular the sector risk profiles, is dependent on other elements of the Action Plan, such as the development of sector networks and improved information sharing. The sector risk profiles will be useful to each sector network in identifying priority areas of sectoral concern, research and planning, developing a sector-specific plan and assessing the effectiveness of critical infrastructure programs and activities.
As illustrated in the flow chart above, the sector risk profiles will enable the development of scenarios.
Key action: The undertaking of sector risk profiles will be managed through each sector network. Sector-specific work plans will be developed and shared among federal, provincial and territorial governments, and owners and operators to address risks to critical infrastructure. Sector-specific work plans will be useful to each sector network in addressing all-hazards and interdependencies confronting their critical infrastructure. Comprehensive: Effective plans and programs must address physical, cyber and human elements of critical infrastructure. Integrated: In light of the shared responsibility for addressing risks to critical infrastructure, and given the widespread implications of critical infrastructure interdependencies, sector-specific work plans need to be complementary across federal, provincial and territorial governments and sectors.
Risk-based:Sector-specific work plans should be based on an understanding of the risk environment and designed to allow measurement, evaluation and feedback on the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. Key action: To address the risks identified in the sector risk profiles, sector-specific work plans will be developed through the sector networks. Key action: Federal, provincial and territorial governments will conduct exercises and assist in the integration of regional exercise planning across jurisdictions and with the critical infrastructure sectors to support a common approach to enhancing the resiliency of critical infrastructure.
Federal, provincial and territorial governments and critical infrastructure sectors will work together to monitor the implementation of the Strategy and support the assessment of programs and activities of the Strategy targeted at enhancing the resiliency of critical infrastructure in Canada.


The Action Plan will be reviewed, in collaboration with the sector networks, the National Cross- Sector Forum and the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Critical Infrastructure Working Group three years after launch and every five years thereafter.
The National Cross-Sector Forum will provide advice and recommendations to the Federal- Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management,which manages federal, provincial and territorial government collaboration on critical infrastructure matters. Currently, critical infrastructure protection is hampered by (i) uneven understanding of risks and vulnerabilities, (ii) insufficient sharing of information and (iii) limited integration of existing information into coherent situational awareness.
To facilitate information sharing among critical infrastructure partners, the Action Plan proposes that an information sharing framework be established to provide a clear structure for the process of establishing information sharing relationships.
As a starting point in the development of the information sharing framework, information dissemination will be improved for (i) emergency situations and (ii) regular situations.
During an emergency, quick exchange of information among key points of contact across the critical infrastructure sectors is needed. Managing risk is a shared responsibility of all critical infrastructure stakeholders to continuously, proactively and systematically understand,manage, and communicate risks and interdependencies across the critical infrastructure community.Moving forward with this comprehensive risk management process requires federal, provincial and territorial governments to collaborate with their critical infrastructure partners.
While the Strategy promotes a common approach to enhancing the resiliency of critical infrastructure, and the sharing of tools and best practices, owners and operators and each jurisdiction are ultimately responsible for implementing a risk management approach appropriate to their situation.
The success of these efforts, in particular the sector risk profiles, is dependent upon other elements of the Action Plan such as the successful establishment of the sector networks and improved information sharing and development.
It is essential that all of the key critical infrastructure partners within a sector have an accurate and common understanding of their risk environment.
Depending upon the nature of each sector and the structure of its sector network, sub-sector risk profiles may also be undertaken. The profiles will be useful to each sector network in identifying priority areas for collective action, issues of concern to particular sectors, priorities for research, development of a sector-specific work plan and assessing the effectiveness of critical infrastructure programs and activities. A risk assessment is a detailed analysis of threats, vulnerabilities and impacts to a particular critical infrastructure asset, site or system. Risk assessments can be used by owners and operators to support the development of sectorspecific work plans to address the highest risks on a priority basis, as well as to develop and implement site-specific emergency plans, such as business continuity plans. The Strategy does not impose a single risk assessment methodology on critical infrastructure partners. Risk assessments for assets, sites or systems will neither be shared broadly across the sector network nor used to create a central inventory of critical infrastructure.A trusted information sharing environment, supported by the Information Protection Protocol, will be created (see Annex D). To improve collective understanding of risk management, tools, guidelines, methodologies and plans will be made available. It is expected that these tools will include a common lexicon of risk management concepts, risk assessment methodologies, educational and awareness materials, and guidelines for implementing a risk management program.
1926.35) that sets forth the policies and procedures to be followed in dealing with emergencies. In addition, the coordinator will supervise all efforts in the emergency response, including coordinating with outside emergency services, such as local fire and police departments, and direct the shutdown of jobsite operations.
Training also should address the emergency response procedures and the location and use of common emergency equipment and the emergency shutdown procedures for operations on the jobsite. It is important to notify the appropriate corporate legal department, which is responsible for managing the risk and avoiding potential legal liability. It is virtually impossible for an employer to deal with all the competing audiences that assemble during a catastrophic accident or fatality without such proper planning. Given the range, complexity and linked nature of these action items, a critical path is also detailed. Should a provincial or territorial government require resources beyond their own in an emergency or critical infrastructure disruption, the federal government responds rapidly to any request for assistance. Renewal of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Critical Infrastructure Working Group will be an integral part of this Action Plan and ongoing critical infrastructure initiatives across Canada.
The sector networks reflect a partnership model that will enable governments and critical infrastructure sectors to undertake a range of activities (e.g.
To support these efforts, each sector network will be provided with a methodology and template incorporating international factors into their sector risk profile. Information will be drawn from governmental sector risk profiles, as appropriate, to support and validate the sector risk profiles at the national level.
Each sector risk profile will be combined to provide a consolidated overview of the risks to critical infrastructure across all sectors in Canada. Scenario-driven models will, in turn, facilitate the development of more precise sector risk assessments and sector-specific plans to address these risks.
Although each plan will be tailored to the structures and challenges of its sector, tools will be made available to help each sector network identify critical assets within the sector, assess risks from an all hazards perspective, and develop measures to address risks for the sector. In addition to the all-hazards component of these plans and programs, analysis should be undertaken to identify and address interdependencies within and across sectors.
This allows owners, operators and governments to reevaluate risk levels after the plan has been implemented.


These plans will be complementary across federal, provincial and territorial governments and sectors. In turn, Federal-Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management Co-Chairs will report to the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Deputy Ministers responsible for emergency management on critical infrastructure matters. The Division’s staff will provide strategic advice, support information sharing, develop the cross-sector risk profile and provide general support to the National Cross- Sector Forum. For example, it is expected that the National Cross- Sector Forum will recommend to the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management areas that require new or updated information products.
This second phase will reflect the Strategy’s all-hazards approach and will include adding information products such as physical and cyber threat assessments, tools for risk assessments, interdependency assessments and other unclassified information products.
The Secure Layer will support twoway information sharing of classified information, including risk assessments. Each sector or sub-sector profile will be combined to provide a consolidated overview of the risks across all sectors. To support the assessment process, and as part of improving information development and sharing, sector-specific risk information will be provided to each sector network for distribution to its members. Each sector network may, however, establish recommendations for risk assessments as it deems appropriate. Training must include process safety information, specific safety and health hazards, emergency operations, operating procedures, Maintenance personnel must be trained on the same information a contractor is trained on = process safety information, emergency response activities, and safe work practices. Clearly, every employer, especially construction employers, must not only prepare, but anticipate each potential workplace emergency before it occurs.
The purpose of the plan is to minimize the employees’ potential for injury during an emergency while, at the same time, prepare and train to effectively deal with the emergency. Under this standard, employers are required to do an assessment of range or types of emergencies at their project site, looking at the worst-case scenario.
With respect to evacuation routes and exits, OSHA requires that emergency action plans set forth the types of evacuation to be used in an emergency situation.
In fact, effective planning may help reduce the pain and suffering of the surviving family and co-workers, while at the same time allow the employer to resume normal construction operations quicker and reduce the financial and potential legal burdens placed on the company. Her extensive construction and risk management background includes stints as executive director the American Subcontractors Association of Metro Washington and the Surety Information Office. Provincial and territorial governments will also coordinate activities with their municipalities and local governments where it applies.
The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management have established priorities for the first and second years after release of the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. The purpose of these exercises is to clarify the understanding of roles and responsibilities, address interdependencies and raise awareness of the risks to critical infrastructure. To ensure the most up-to-date information is available to each sector network, sector risk profiles should be submitted to the National Cross-Sector Forum annually.
Though considered an important activity to enhance the resiliency of critical infrastructure, the Strategy does not impose a requirement on owners and operators to undertake risk assessments.
Owners must train contractors on the process safety information, emergency response activities, and safe work practices. Notification of the corporate or company management personnel responsible for operations at the project site will be important in assisting the follow-up and resumptions of construction operations.
In addition to direct coordination between critical infrastructure partners, the structures described below provide a national framework that fosters relationships and improves information sharing and risk management within and across critical infrastructure sectors. These sector networks will also enable improved collaboration among critical infrastructure partners in the development and execution of risk management and information sharing activities. Therefore, each sector network will adopt a comprehensive approach to strengthening the resiliency of critical infrastructure, based on an integrated, all-hazards risk management approach.
The undertaking of sector risk profiles at the national level will be managed through each sector network. A determination must be made on whether outside legal counsel is needed, based on the scope of the workplace emergency. Each sector network will also develop sector risk profiles, support the development of tools and best practices, and advance implementation of the Strategy within their sector. It is anticipated that the sector-specific plans will continue to evolve as the critical infrastructure, threats against them, and strategies for protecting against and responding to these threats and incidents evolve. In dealing with any emergency, the employer also should ensure that the insurance issues (such as workers’ compensation) are handled in a timely fashion without a lot of red tape. All management of change actions must be coordinated and integrated with current operating procedures and operating personnel must be oriented to the changes in procedures before the change is made.



Emergency broadcast alert
Emergency medical plan template


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