Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan for small businesses need effectual strategies to deal with and to recover from disrupting occurrences. It is apparent that disasters such as earthquake, floods, hurricanes and several other disasters inflict thousands of businesses to suffer heavy losses and many of them even get locked. As an owner of a small business, it becomes unavoidable to protect critical units of your organization, including your IT server room, power utilities, and highly expensive and heavy equipments including employees and customers from injury within your business premises in an event of disaster. One of the fundamental elements of Business Continuity Plan is Data Center Disaster Recovery.
Data Center Disaster Recovery complexity is the measure of how difficult it would be to recover the database to a satisfactory level of service following a prolonged disruption or outage.
The best feature of Data Center Disaster Recovery Plan is that it will help you in numerous ways no matter the adversity strikes or not.
Given below is the list of Data Center Disaster Recovery Template Packages that can initiate your Data Center Disaster Recovery project.
Disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact analysis (BIA) are crucial steps in the development of a disaster recovery plan. To do that, let us remind ourselves of the overall goals of disaster recovery planning, which are to provide strategies and procedures that can help return IT operations to an acceptable level of performance as quickly as possible following a disruptive event. Having established our mission, and assuming we have management approval and funding for a disaster recovery initiative, we can establish a project plan.
A disaster recovery project has a fairly consistent structure, which makes it easy to organise and conduct plan development activity.
Adapted with permission from the BCM Lifecycle developed by the Business Continuity Institute. As you can see from The IT Disaster Recovery Lifecycle illustration, the IT disaster recovery process has a standard process flow. Following the BIA and risk assessment, the next steps are to define, build and test detailed disaster recovery plans that can be invoked in case disaster actually strikes the organisation’s critical IT assets. Detailed response planning and the other key parts of disaster recovery planning, such as plan maintenance, are, however, outside the scope of this article so let us get back to looking at disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact assessment in detail.
Working with IT managers and members of your building facilities staff as well as risk management staff if you have them, you can identify the events that could potentially impact data centre operations. A BIA attempts to relate specific risks to their potential impact on things such as business operations, financial performance, reputation, employees and supply chains.
BIA outputs should present a clear picture of the actual impacts on the business, both in terms of potential problems and probable costs.
2C Consulting’s Barnes said a key aim of the BIA should be to define the maximum period of time the business can survive without IT. Business impact analysis (BIA) is a systematic process to determine and evaluate the potential effects of an interruption to critical business operations as a result of a disaster, accident or emergency. As part of a disaster recovery plan, a BIA is likely to identify costs linked to failures, such as loss of cash flow, replacement of equipment, salaries paid to catch up with a backlog of work, loss of profits, staff and data, and so on.
Business impact analysis and risk assessment are two important steps in a business continuity plan.


During the risk assessment phase, the BIA findings may be examined against various hazard scenarios, and potential disruptions may be prioritized based on the hazard’s probability and the likelihood of adverse impact to business operations.
A detailed questionnaire or survey is commonly developed to identify critical business processes, resources, relationships and other information that will be essential in assessing the potential impact of a disruptive event.
The information gathered may include a description of the principle activities that the business units perform, subjective rankings of the importance of specific processes, names or organizations that depend on the processes for normal operations, estimates of the quantitative impact associated with a specific business function and the non-financial impact of the loss of the function, critical information systems and their users, the staff members needed to recover important systems, and the time and steps required for a business unit to recover to a normal working state.
Questions to explore during the discovery phase include interdependencies between systems, business processes and departments, the significance of the risk of points of failure, responsibilities associated with service-level agreements, staff and space that may be required at a recovery site, special supplies or communication equipment needed, and cash management and liquidity necessary for recovery.
A description of the customer impact of external facing or inward facing processes, and a list of departments that depend on the process outputs. A BIA for information technology might start with the identification of applications supporting essential business functions, interdependencies between existing systems, possible failure points, and costs associated with the system failure. When information gathering is complete, the review phase begins in consultation with business leaders who can validate the findings. The goals of the BIA analysis phase are to determine the most crucial business functions and systems, the staff and technology resources needed for operations to run optimally, and the time frame within which the functions need to be recovered for the organization to restore operations as close as possible to a normal working state.
Challenges include determining the revenue impact of a business function and quantifying the long-term impact of losses in market share, business image or customers.
The business impact analysis report typically includes an executive summary, information on the methodology for data gathering and analysis, detailed findings on the various business units and functional areas, charts and diagrams to illustrate potential losses, and recommendations for recovery. Senior management reviews the report to devise a business continuity plan and disaster recovery strategy that takes into account maximum permissible downtime for important business functions and acceptable losses in areas such as data, finances and reputation.
The rising prevalence of disaster and insecure environment has made it indispensable for every organization to create standard security policy and procedures that comply with regulatory authorities.
The Data Recovery Plan helps you in creating proper backup system in place, provides immediate access to have files restored, highly confidential and critical data security, and helps in keeping the vast documentation database in order. But, before we look at them in detail, we need to locate disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact assessment in the overall planning process. The speed at which IT assets can be returned to normal or near-normal performance will impact how quickly the organisation can return to business as usual or an acceptable interim state of operations. Such plans provide a step-by-step process for responding to a disruptive event with steps designed to provide an easy-to-use and repeatable process for recovering damaged IT assets to normal operation as quickly as possible.
Operational and financial losses may be significant, and the impact of these events could affect the firm’s competitive position and reputation, for example. The results of the BIA should help determine which areas require which levels of protection, the amount to which the business can tolerate disruptions and the minimum IT service levels needed by the business. A BIA is an essential component of an organization's business continuance plan; it includes an exploratory component to reveal any vulnerabilities and a planning component to develop strategies for minimizing risk.
A BIA report quantifies the importance of business components and suggests appropriate fund allocation for measures to protect them. Assets put at risk include people, property, supply chain, information technology, business reputation and contract obligations. A BIA may be used to justify investments in prevention and mitigation, as well as disaster recovery strategies.


A spreadsheet may be used to store and organize information such as interview details, business process descriptions, estimated costs, and expected recovery timeframes and equipment inventories. Impacts to consider include delayed sales or income, increased labor expenses, regulatory fines, contractual penalties and customer dissatisfaction. The report prioritizes the most important business functions, examines the impact of business interruptions, specifies legal and regulatory requirements, details acceptable levels of downtime and losses, and lists the RTOs and RPOs. Senior managers need to review and update the BIA periodically as business operations change.
A high end server, computer backup system guarantees that your critical business unit continues to run smoothly and competently, even if something unforeseen happens. The BIA identifies the most important business functions and the IT systems and assets that support them. The final column lists the product of likelihood x impact, and this becomes your risk factor. For example, in the Lloyd's insurance market in London, all businesses depend on a firm called Xchanging to provide premiums and claims processing. The result is a business impact analysis report, which describes the potential risks specific to the organization studied. The possibilities of failures are likely to be assessed in terms of their impacts in areas such as safety, finances, marketing, business reputation, legal compliance and quality assurance.
The BIA focuses on the effects or consequences of the interruption to critical business functions and attempts to quantify the financial and non-financial costs associated with a disaster. Next, the risk assessment examines the internal and external threats and vulnerabilities that could negatively impact IT assets. Those events with the highest risk factor are the ones your disaster recovery plan should primarily aim to address.
One of the basic assumptions behind BIA is that every component of the organization is reliant upon the continued functioning of every other component, but that some are more crucial than others and require a greater allocation of funds in the wake of a disaster. The business impact assessment looks at the parts of the organization that are most crucial. A mitigation strategy may be developed to reduce the probability that a hazard will have a significant impact. For example, a business may be able to continue more or less normally if the cafeteria has to close, but would come to a complete halt if the information system crashes. For example, a business may spend three times as much on marketing in the wake of a disaster to rebuild customer confidence.
A BIA can serve as a starting point for a disaster recovery strategy and examine recovery time objectives (RTOs) and recovery point objectives (RPOs), and resources and materials needed for business continuance. The BIA should assess a disaster’s impact over time and help to establish recovery strategies, priorities, and requirements for resources and time.



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