Another excellent resource for library managers who are preparing for the worst is Disaster Planning, a How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians (Halsted, Jasper & Little 2005). This work contains a detailed step-by-step guide for creating a disaster preparation strategy, including a section on writing a disaster plan. It is almost impossible to imagine what ensues when disaster strikes; therefore, it's very important to imbue a newly-formed disaster team with a sense of the myriad of details it will be confronted with in an actual disaster and a grasp of the urgency it will face when the collection is under siege. Like the M25 Consortium of Academic Libraries website, it offers a customizable disaster plan template as well as a Disaster Mitigation Web Site Kit which allows managers to build an online version of the disaster plan (allowing for offsite access and easy revision and propagation) (Halsted, Jasper & Little, p.xx).
Students and experts in the science and technology power restored (and had energy to their tv sets), cable. You can use this Business Continuity Plan Template (48 page Word, 12 Excel spreadsheets, with its free Business Impact Analysis, and Damage Assessment Report templates to recover quickly and effectively from an unforeseen disaster or emergency. This BCP provides templates, checklist, forms, and guidelines that cover all functions required in Business Continuity Planning. This is the heart of your disaster recovery plan and should include as many pictures, data flows and diagrams as possible. In the interrogation stage of the disaster recovery plan, you begin to ask questions, fill in the gaps and ultimately gather the knowledge points that currently reside with the key players in your organization. A scope statement, process layering, interrogation and a contact list become the skeleton of your DRP document, and you can use the document for more than just a DRP plan to have on file. It must provide for both major and minor emergencies and should include both site-specific and community-wide events. The response checklist should indicate brief statements regarding particular activities that should be performed in the recovery phase.
A training program outline should be included in the plan to document subjects in which employees have been trained and the frequency the training was administered.
There are certain methods to creating a solid disaster recovery plan that every IT manager should follow. By submitting my Email address I confirm that I have read and accepted the Terms of Use and Declaration of Consent. By submitting your email address, you agree to receive emails regarding relevant topic offers from TechTarget and its partners.
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The scope of this plan is to define the recovery steps in the event of a domain controller failure. The scope of this plan is to recover from a loss of SQL Server 2005 Integration and Analysis Services. If you find that this document is getting bigger than you want it to, come back and re-evaluate the scope.
The key to the process layering diagram is in building a complete high-level picture of the scope of the Windows disaster recovery plan.
Ask the key employees responsible for each layer questions about that layer and document their responses.
Russell Olsen is currently the CIO of a Medical Data Mining company and previously worked for a Big Four accounting firm performing technology risk assessments. Learn how to develop disaster recovery strategies as well as how to write a disaster recovery plan with these step-by-step instructions.
The following section details the elements in a DR plan in the sequence defined by ISO 27031 and ISO 24762.
Disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact analysis (BIA) are crucial steps in the development of a disaster recovery plan. Detailed response planning and the other key parts of disaster recovery planning, such as plan maintenance, are, however, outside the scope of this article so let us get back to looking at disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact assessment in detail. The next section should define roles and responsibilities of DR recovery team members, their contact details, spending limits (for example, if equipment has to be purchased) and the limits of their authority in a disaster situation. Based on the findings from incident response activities, the next step is to determine if disaster recovery plans should be launched, and which ones in particular should be invoked.


A section on plan document dates and revisions is essential, and should include dates of revisions, what was revised and who approved the revisions. Once the plan has been launched, DR teams take the materials assigned to them and proceed with response and recovery activities as specified in the plans.
Located at the end of the plan, these can include systems inventories, application inventories, network asset inventories, contracts and service-level agreements, supplier contact data, and any additional documentation that will facilitate recovery. These are essential in that they ensure employees are fully aware of DR plans and their responsibilities in a disaster, and DR team members have been trained in their roles and responsibilities as defined in the plans.
Such plans provide a step-by-step process for responding to a disruptive event with steps designed to provide an easy-to-use and repeatable process for recovering damaged IT assets to normal operation as quickly as possible.
Then define step-by-step procedures to, for example, initiate data backup to secure alternate locations, relocate operations to an alternate space, recover systems and data at the alternate sites, and resume operations at either the original site or at a new location. Here we can see the critical system and associated threat, the response strategy and (new) response action steps, as well as the recovery strategy and (new) recovery action steps.
And since DR planning generates a significant amount of documentation, records management (and change management) activities should also be initiated. The BIA identifies the most important business functions and the IT systems and assets that support them. This section defines the criteria for launching the plan, what data is needed and who makes the determination. Team members should be encouraged to focus on specific areas pertinent to their designated roles and to become resident experts in these domains, perhaps authoring individual sections of the official disaster plan. This will enable an intelligent response to the many offers of assistance that will doubtlessly come in the case of disaster from a variety of sources, including overtures from those who wish simply to profit from the library's misfortune. The purpose of emergency planning is to provide the basis for systematic responses to emergencies that threaten an organization and the records and information necessary for continuing operations. These steps will help overcome any writer's block that comes with the seemingly overwhelming task of creating a document such as a disaster recovery plan.
Organizations should have a checklist covering each emergency and the steps necessary to prepare for and control the emergency.
Examples of checklists to include are the vital records schedule and records recovery priority lists. Testing Procedures The plan must include goals, objectives, and schedules for conducting exercises or simulations. The easiest way to create your disaster recovery document is to start with a framework and then address the details. As you do this, you will quickly realize that there are areas and complexities that you didn't originally consider. The business process will help determine which IT applications and infrastructure must be restored to allow that business process to operate. If you aren't sure where to start, you can always revert to this fifth-grade education tip: Ask who, what, where, when, why and how. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Formulating a detailed recovery plan is the main aim of the entire IT disaster recovery planning project. Once you have identified your critical systems, RTOs, RPOs, etc, create a table, as shown below, to help you formulate the disaster recovery strategies you will use to protect them. Important: Best-in-class DR plans should begin with a few pages that summarise key action steps (such as where to assemble employees if forced to evacuate the building) and lists of key contacts and their contact information for ease of authorising and launching the plan. To do that, let us remind ourselves of the overall goals of disaster recovery planning, which are to provide strategies and procedures that can help return IT operations to an acceptable level of performance as quickly as possible following a disruptive event.
It is in these plans that you will set out the detailed steps needed to recover your IT systems to a state in which they can support the business after a disaster.
During the incident response process, we typically become aware of an out-of-normal situation (such as being alerted by various system-level alarms), quickly assess the situation (and any damage) to make an early determination of its severity, attempt to contain the incident and bring it under control, and notify management and other key stakeholders. But, before we look at them in detail, we need to locate disaster recovery risk assessment and business impact assessment in the overall planning process.


This section should specify who has approved the plan, who is authorised to activate it and a list of linkages to other relevant plans and documents. The more detailed the plan is, the more likely the affected IT asset will be recovered and returned to normal operation. Technology DR plans can be enhanced with relevant recovery information and procedures obtained from system vendors. These include preparing risk assessments, mitigating against potential crises, procedures to handle the disaster recovery phase, and organizing testing, training and maintenance instructions for keeping the plan up-to-date. Don't forget to include contacts for the business layer -- they will ultimately have to sign off that any recovery efforts were successful.
If several teams will be involved, each team and respective member responsibilities should be included in the plan.
For example, emergency or vital records and information may be transferred to the requestor via a special color-coded mail pouch. Additionally, disaster recovery procedures, disaster recovery services and resources, and salvage equipment and supply listings should be included. Look back at the scope statement -- if these additional processes and systems don't directly relate to your scope, leave them out. Having established our mission, and assuming we have management approval and funding for a disaster recovery initiative, we can establish a project plan.
Procedures should ensure an easy-to-use and repeatable process for recovering damaged IT assets and returning them to normal operation as quickly as possible. If your organisation already has records management and change management programmes, use them in your DR planning.
Survival also means maintaining the competitive position and financial stability of an organization immediately following and continuing long after an emergency. Preparedness Checklist The emergency plan must address specific emergencies and how to handle them. In addition to using the strategies previously developed, IT disaster recovery plans should form part of an incident response process that addresses the initial stages of the incident and the steps to be taken. A disaster recovery project has a fairly consistent structure, which makes it easy to organise and conduct plan development activity. This process can be seen as a timeline, such as in Figure 2, in which incident response actions precede disaster recovery actions.
Those events with the highest risk factor are the ones your disaster recovery plan should primarily aim to address. An emergency management plan is a unique, detailed guide for times of great stress and crisis.
Recovery Checklist A recovery checklist should also show the continuing steps from the response phase to the recovery phase.
As you can see from The IT Disaster Recovery Lifecycle illustration, the IT disaster recovery process has a standard process flow. Included within this part of the plan should be assembly areas for staff (primary and alternates), procedures for notifying and activating DR team members, and procedures for standing down the plan if management determines the DR plan response is not needed. The result of the planning process is a written records and information emergency management plan. Check with your vendors while developing your DR plans to see what they have in terms of emergency recovery documentation. Management approves this plan and provides the necessary authority, structure, policies, procedures, and resources to guide the organization through an emergency. It wasn't until he went on vacation and someone asked what happened when the expected did not occur that I realized he was manually doing this and not the application.



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