Any area which is mostly flat is susceptible to blizzards, though there are some areas in the US, Australia, and the UK that suffer from blizzards more than others.
Blizzards are one of nature’s deadlier storms, as the conditions make travel and movement hazardous.
Visibility is drastically reduced, in some cases to as little as 3 meters or what is called zero visibility.  In a ground blizzard, though no new snow is falling, the snow already on the ground is whipped up and around by the winds to where visibility is also close to zero.
Blizzards have been known to come suddenly and while it is possible to be warned in advance, it’s not always possible to be entirely prepared for the intensity of the blizzard. Though not as common as snowstorms, tornadoes, or even hurricanes, blizzards are deadly every time they hit.
Although meteorologists are now able to more accurately predict blizzards, the storms still have the ability to cripple whole cities at a time, and deaths are almost always inevitable.
Countries which are not used to large amounts of snow, extreme cold, and long periods of strong winds tend to have a harder time coping when the storms hit. In order to qualify as a blizzard, winds have to be at least 35mph and rage for a longer period of time—at least three hours or more.
Clearing roads is not possible until after the blizzard has passed and then takes a long time due to the intensity of the build up.


On the morning of the blizzard, the weather was warm, resulting in many hunters going out to take advantage of ideal conditions. Because the day started out relatively fair, people went about their lives, with children going to school and adults going to work. Over the years, rescue missions during and after blizzards are becoming better and preparedness goes a long way towards preventing large amounts of casualties. The amount of snowfall has little to do with a storm qualifying as a snowstorm, but rather the intensity of the wind and length of time.
Almost every blizzard results in at least a few deaths, with some of the bigger ones resulting in hundreds of people dying. Because blizzards rage for so long, people can get trapped in their cars, freezing to death as they wait for it to clear. The aftermath of the blizzard can be almost as dangerous as the storm itself, as people trapped inside vehicles, unheated buildings, or outdoors take longer to be found and brought to warmth and safety.
Because the first blizzard hit in October, before most farmers had the opportunity to bring in their crops. It has also become considerably easier to notify people of oncoming storms, with more reliable predictions and getting the word out quickly and effectively.


There is always a chance of power outages, communications systems breaking down, people going for long periods with little or no heat, and getting trapped outdoors or in a vehicle. However, the most common usage of the name is in the coastal regions of Atlantic Canada and New England. One after the other the blizzards continued to hit, making travel impossible, even by train. People were at the brink of starvation and train services stopped completely by January 1880 as no matter how often they cleared the tracks, another storm would come and cover them again.
There are weather websites set up to help people prepare for blizzards and post warnings when a snowstorm is being upgraded to a blizzard.
One of the deadliest blizzards in the USA—the Great Blizzard of 1888—was a nor’easter, killing 400 people after dumping 40-50 inches of snow. By then, towns and farmers had to tunnel through the snow to get to livestock, wood for heating, and supplies.  Once the snow started melting, huge areas were flooded, washing away huge areas around the Missouri river.



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