A Faraday cage, also known as a Faraday shield, Radio Frequency Cage, or EMF (Electromotive Force) Cage, is simply an enclosure built to protect electronic devices from electromagnetic radiation and electrostatic discharges. The sources of these surges can be powerful lightning strikes, destructive solar flares (CMEs, or Coronal Mass Ejections) directed toward earth, or the effects of an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) from a nuclear bomb detonation high in the atmosphere. The device is named for Michael Faraday, who observed in 1836 that the excess charge from a conductor remained on the outside of a container and had no effect on the interior contents. Many people buy Faraday bags to protect their cell phones and laptops both from electrical surges and from unwanted surveillance or tracking. According to the National Weather Service, an automobile is essentially a Faraday cage, and it’s the metal surrounding you, not the rubber tires, that protects you from lightning (as long as you’re not touching metal inside the car).[i] A smaller example is a microwave oven, which is a Faraday cage in reverse, trapping the waves inside the device instead of keeping them out. Second, you won’t be the only “techie” who thought to protect valuable electronics in a Faraday cage.
In addition, whatever is inside should be adequately insulated from the cage itself, such as being placed on wood, in a cardboard box, or on a rubber mat so that it doesn’t touch any metal.


Several experts say that simply putting the lid on the can, even if it fits tightly, is an insufficient seal. Remember, this is for long-term storage of the appliances inside, not something that you can take your appliances out of to use and then return to the container without a great deal of trouble. Any box made of non-conductive material such as plywood, and then totally covered with metal, metal mesh, or metal screening can serve as a Faraday cage. This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged Faraday Cage, disaster preparedness, DIY, emergency preparedness, preparedness, disaster, skills, emergency power on February 12, 2014 by beprepared. It can be anything from a small box to a large room, covered with conductive metal or wire mesh, which prevents surges from damaging the equipment inside. They suggest folding a sheet of metal screening around the top of the can and over the top lid and then forcing the lid over that to maintain a constant, tight-fitting metallic connection. We can hope that nothing will happen to damage our electronics, but in case our hopes are vain, we’ll be happy for every measure we've taken to prepare!


Though the device bears Faraday’s name, Benjamin Franklin is believed to have been the first to discover the principle. Military planners and politicians who have reason to keep their communications private often meet in Faraday-protected rooms that are impervious to electronic “eavesdropping.” In 2013, the Vatican even used the technology to shield the Sistine Chapel from curious listeners during the deliberations to select the new Pope.
The metal can be attached to the wood with staples or screws, whichever seems to work best for you.



Kids infobits
Disaster preparedness month 2015


Comments

  1. 10.11.2013 at 12:49:18


    Survival kit primarily based on the types.

    Author: LorD
  2. 10.11.2013 at 17:23:18


    Get shocked-It would not be essential to try it- it really is a stretch for all prospective and you.

    Author: PARTIZAN