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Errea has been Iceland shirt supplier since 2004 and, although it was rumored a 'bigger' brand could take over for the Iceland Euro 2016 kits, produces the new Iceland home and away shirts. Blue shorts and socks will be worn together with the Iceland 2016 shirt to create an all-blue look. Based on the same template as the Iceland home shirt, the new Iceland away kit is predominantly white.
Iceland Euro 2016 Goalkeeper KitsThese appear to be the new Iceland goalkeeper jerseys, but could also be alternative player jerseys for the case of kit clashes. Again based on the same template, the Iceland 2016 goalkeeper shirts are black and fluorescent yellow, respectively.
Glaciers and mountains in the realm of Vatnajökull National Park offer the guests of Hotel Arnanes a great opportunity to see the dance of the northern lights. Northern Lights, or aurora borealis can be seen at a certain period of time when there is a high sunspot activity.
Arnanes is an ideal spot to see the northern lights, since located in the country side with little or no light ,,pollution”.
Ofcourse there is no quarantee of seeing these lights but the area where Arnanes Hotel is located, is known for having more days of clear skies (Icelandic Met Office) than most of other areas in Iceland. Warm clothes are useful since the lights are seen late in the evening and into the night, mostly during winter.
Welcome to Hotel Arnanes, a comfortable base for exploring Vatnajokull National Park with all its wonders like Jokulsarlon, the ice lagoon.
Harpa – Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre, designed by Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with Batterii? Architects and Studio Olafur Eliasson, has won one of the most prestigious architecture awards worldwide, The European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award 2013.
The European Commission and the Fundacio Mies van der Rohe have announced the five finalists who will compete for the 2013 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award.
It is only the second time in the history of the award that a Danish designed project is in the final. Harpa – Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre has won two international awards in one week.
More than 300 international projects were short-listed for the prestigious ‘Civic Trust’ Award, which was presented at a ceremony in Edingburgh on 2 March. The ’Best Performance Space’ award of Travel+Leisure will be presented at a gala dinner in Berlin on 7 March together with a number of other awards significant to the travel industry.
The new concert hall in Iceland, Harpa – Reykjvaik Concert Hall and Conference Centre, has been selected as one of the world’s ten best concert halls – uniquely combing world-class acoustics and distinctive architecture. The new concert hall in Iceland, Harpa – Reykjvaik Concert Hall and Conference Centre, has been selected as Building of the Year by the leading Swedish magazine for Nordic architecture and design, FORM.
The concert hall has received great recognition in Danish and international architecture and art journals. The south facade of Harpa is inspired by the geological basalt stone formations along the Icelandic coast. Art and architecture are beautifully united in the 29,000 m2 concert hall comprising four music and conference halls. With a festive musical programme, the new Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre, Harpa, was officially inaugurated on Saturday 20 August.
Inspired by the geological basalt stone formations along the Icelandic coast, the south facade rises up 33 metres. The remaining two-dimensional facades and roof build on the geometry of the south facade as a cut through the three-dimensional shape.
Harpa – Reykjavik Concert Hall and Concert Centre forms part of an extensive development plan for the east harbour in Reykjavik – with the objective of bringing the city and harbour closer together. Harpa’s opening celebrations begin today, May 4, 2011, and run through August 20, 2011 when the building is inaugurated and the facade is illuminated during Reykjavik’s Culture Night.
Designed by Henning Larsen Architects and Batterii?, the 28,000 square?meter (301,000 square?feet) building comprises four main halls, including the 1,800?seat concert hall, several meeting rooms, and a spacious exhibition area. Harpa’s multi?faceted glass facades are the result of a unique collaboration between renowned artist Olafur Eliasson and Henning Larsen Architects. Harpa – Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre, May 4, 2011 Opening Concert, Eldborg Hall. March 1, 2011, Reykjavik, Iceland – The box office for Harpa – Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre opened today, offering tickets to Harpa’s highly-anticipated opening concerts launching in May 2011.
Tickets are also available today to the concert of German tenor Jonas Kaufmann, which is presented as part of the Reykjavik Arts Festival.
In addition to the May 4 and 5 concerts, Harpa will also launch with a special opening concert featuring other musical acts to take place on May 13, 2011, followed by an open house for the public on May 14, and a special children’s day on May 15.
Designed by Henning Larsen Architects with acoustics by Artec Consultants Inc and a facade by Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with the architects, Harpa is to become home to the Iceland Symphony Orchestra and the Icelandic Opera, and thus a major addition to the Icelandic and European cultural scene.
Harpa is expected to become a hub in the city’s vibrant music scene and to attract an audience of culture, architecture, and art enthusiasts as well as major international business and trade events.
The opening artistic program will be announced in the autumn of 2010 and will offer a diverse range of performances, from classical to contemporary. Harpa’s name comes both from the name of the string instrument and the ancient Icelandic name of a month in the old Nordic calendar, which marks the beginning of summer, a period of particular importance in Iceland. Harpa’s logo was designed by The Icelandic Ad Agency and consists of a ring of outstretched tuning forks. Located on the harbour between the city centre and the North Atlantic Ocean, Harpa will become one of the city’s defining landmarks. The multi-faceted glass facade by artist Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with the architects is based on a geometric principle, realised in two and three dimensions.


Throughout the design process, emphasis has been placed on giving Harpa enough versatility to host large and intimate events simultaneously and without interference with one another. With acoustics design and technical facility planning provided by the world renowned Artec Consultants Inc, designers of the Jazz at Lincoln Center space, the Bartok Bela National Concert Hall in Budapest, Sala Sao Paulo and the Culture and Congress Center in Lucerne, Switzerland, Harpa will join the ranks of the most prestigious international concert halls in the world, as a prominent member of Artec’s family of halls.
The main concert hall, the largest of four in the Centre, is capable of accommodating up to 1,800 people.
White Silica mud settles at the bottom of the lagoon and doubles up as a perfect mineral-rich face packRandom fact: The lagoon is actually artificial and was created as an over-spill pool for the nearby Svartsengi geothermal power station. The current coat of arms of Morocco (formally; the royal coat of arms) was introduced 14 August 1957.
Set to be worn at Iceland's first-ever participation at a major tournament, the new Iceland 2016 jerseys boasts designs in the colors of the Icelandic flag, blue, white and red. A red-and-white stripes, deriving from the Icelandic flag and the Iceland federation badge, runs down the left side of the new Iceland jersey, while the inside of the shirt reads 'Fyrir Island' (For Iceland) in large white letters.
Two red, two white and a red stripe run down on the left side of the new Iceland away jersey, inspired by the Icelandic flag.
The award is given to projects of high architectural value that have contributed to the social, cultural or economic development of the local community. A jury consisting of six members from the world and design and architecture has selected Harpa as this year’s winner in the performance space category. The distinguished British magazine, Grammaphone, is behind the selection, featuring in its January issue.
Further down the list, you find Holmenkollen Ski Jump by JDS Architects and 8-tallet by BIG.
In the Danish architecture magazine, Arkitektur DK 5 11, Harpa is acknowledged for its unique facade and orientation towards the city.
Harpa forms part of an extensive development plan for the east harbour in Reykjavik – with the objective of bringing the city and harbour closer together. The opening took place in connection with the annual jazz and cultural festival of Reykjavik, and the Concert Hall hosted numerous concerts throughout the day. The glass captures the light of the sun and colours of the sky and appears as a giant, illuminating sculpture, reflecting the sky and harbour and the vibrant city life. The arrival area and foyer are situated in the front part of the building, the four music and conference halls in the centre and the backstage area with offices, administration, rehearsal and dressing rooms in the rear end of the building. Thus, the building will become a landmark in the area and at the same time a symbol of the economic recovery of Iceland. Today, Harpa presents the highly anticipated opening concert, featuring a performance of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony by the Iceland Symphony Orchestra (ISO), led by its Conductor Laureate Vladimir Ashkenazy. Harpa unites the most important classical music and performance venue in the country with an international conference centre. Seen from the foyer, the halls form a massif with the Main Concert Hall as its red?glowing centre. The first concerts in the new landmark concert hall will take place May 4 and 5, 2011, and will feature the Icelandic Symphony Orchestra, led by Conductor Laureate Vladimir Ashkenazy, performing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, work by Icelandic composer Thorkell Sigurbjornsson, and a piano concerto by Grieg in A-minor performed by piano prodigy Vikingur Heidar Olafsson. Other events on sale in the next few days are a concert by Icelandic pop star Pall Oskar and Spanish flamenco-fusion band Ojos de Brujo, also part of the Reykjavik Arts Festival, as well as other concerts of the Iceland Symphony. Eiriksson, Chairman of Portus, announced today that the official opening and opening concert by the Iceland Symphony Orchestra at Harpa, Reykjavik’s new Concert Hall and Conference Centre, would take place on 4 May 2011. It will also serve as a tourism and business hub, providing flexible facilities for programs and international events. Based on a cooperative model, it will allow for a mix of large conventions, receptions, concerts, exhibitions and public programs that can all happen simultaneously. It is being developed under the guidance of artistic adviser Vladimir Ashkenazy and international consultant Jasper Parrott. It finds its roots in a classic and universal symbol of music arranged in a way that also resembles the sun or a snowflake.
According to Henning Larsen Architects, “the inner structure of the building shapes its key functions.
Reminiscent of the crystallised basalt columns commonly found in Iceland, the southern facade create kaleidoscopic reflections of the city and the striking surrounding landscape. Harpa’s facilities, which offer some of the most technologically advanced equipment available, are thus capable of accommodating everything from large conventions, concerts, and exhibitions to smaller banquets and meetings.
In addition to hosting an array of international music events, Harpa will also become home to the esteemed Iceland Symphony Orchestra and Icelandic Opera, both known for their professional artistic programs. A spacious entrance hall is located on both the first and second levels and is the ideal space for exhibitions, large banquets, and receptions. By the time it reaches the lagoon, the mineral-rich milky, aqua blue waters simmer at temperatures between 37 and 39A°C. It was developed by the graphic artists Gauthier and Hainaut and shows a green pentagram on a red background before the Atlas Mountains and a rising sun.
Rounding off the design is the Icelandic flag, placed on the upper back below the neckline. A remarkable collar construction in blue and white, with Island being written on a tape on the inside completes the modern-yet-bold look of the Iceland Euro 2016 away kit.
Launched in Britain in 1959, the purpose of the award scheme is to recognise outstanding architecture and landscape planning. Harpa is designed by Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with Batterii? Architects and the facade in collaboration with the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. The spectacular south facade has been developed in collaboration with the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. As the background to the selection of Harpa as Building of the Year, the magazine writes: ”Whether the new Harpa Concert Hall is a symbol of a new, reborn Iceland or of the same old island that suffered from financial hubris is a hot topic now.


Ifversen, wrote: “A spectacular foyer rises behind the glass facade, stretching all the way up through the 43 m tall building. The glass captures the light of the sun and colours of the sky and appears as a giant, illuminating sculpture, reflecting the sky and harbour. Made up of more than 12,000 m2 glass, the building changes colours depending on the weather and time of day and year. Artec Acoustic Consultants is behind the acoustic design, which has already received great reviews in connection with the many opening concerts during the summer. On Saturday, May 14, Harpa will host its first open house, which will include tours of the building, as well as more musical events and performances.
Offering a diverse range of performances, from classical to contemporary, it is home to the Iceland Symphony Orchestra (ISO) and The Icelandic Opera. This inner massif contrasts the expressive and open facades, thereby generating a dialogue that defines Harpa’s public space, continued in the square in front of the building.
Reminiscent of the crystallised basalt columns commonly found in Iceland, the southern facades create kaleidoscopic reflections of the city and the striking surrounding landscape. This autumn, Harpa will become the home of annual music festivals in Reykjavik, in keeping with the centre’s aim of presenting a wide variety of music, and welcoming performers of all musical genres.
It is the most ambitious cultural project in Iceland as well as an endeavor of great importance for the community. The facade was designed by Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with Henning Larsen Architects.
Harpa is run by Portus and Ago, administrative structures which respectively own and operate the building and its programs. The circular arrangement calls to mind people coming together and represent the 12 months of the year, while the forks’ colours symbolize the colours of the different halls. Seen from the foyer, the halls form a massif with the Main Concert Hall as its red-glowing centre. Natural light is a key element, dramatically altering the transparency, reflectivity, and colours of the facades as the weather and seasons change. Reykjavik has been waiting for decades for this new hall and its addition to the city?s energetic musical life. In addition to the lagoon, there's a sauna, steam bath carved out of a lava cave and a massaging waterfall. The long, wide stairs and displaced floors create an overwhelming, adventurous space with surprisingly good acoustics and a beautiful view of Reykjavik City.
The spectacular south facade was developed in collaboration with the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. On May 15, Harpa will present a Children’s Festival in celebration of future generations of Icelandic musicians.
Harpa also serves as a tourism and business hub, providing flexible facilities for programs and international events.
On 14 May 2011, Harpa will stage a grand opening program featuring a diverse range of music events and many of Iceland’s most prominent musicians. With acoustics conceived by Artec Consultants Inc, one of the most reputable experts in the field, and equipped with the most technologically advanced sound, staging and presentation systems also designed by Artec, the 28,000 square-meter (301,000 square-feet) complex will be a striking landmark in the redevelopment of the historic harbour and waterfront area, and a symbol of the country’s renewed dynamism.Henning Larsen Architects also consulted with Batterii? Architects to conceive the building.
The quasi bricks of the south facades contain LED lights in different hues that make Harpa glow long after the sun has set. Additional amenities include boutiques, a viewing balcony, a bar and restaurant with direct views across the harbour, a ground-floor bistro, catering, and underground parking options. Rooms at the Hotel Leifur Eiriksson in the city centre start from 11,600 kronur (around A?90) for a double room. Harpa’s facade was designed by renowned artist Olafur Eliasson and Henning Larsen Architects, the building by Henning Larsen Architects and Batterii? Architects, and the performing arts venues acoustics and theater design by Artec Consultants Inc.
The assemblage of the glass?and?steel facade is under way and will be completed in the late summer 2011, while a large section of the north side of the building facing the ocean has already been erected.
Eiriksson is the Chairman of Portus and Thorunn Sigurdardottir, the former Director of the Reykjavik Arts Festival, is the Chairman of Ago.
Because, even though the Blue Lagoon is an out-and-out tourist attraction, it manages to wow even the biggest cynics with its special brand of geothermal magic.
The high mineral content in the water may be working wonders on your skin but it will play havoc with your hair. Harpa is a landmark in the redevelopment of Reykjavik’s historic harbour and waterfront area, and a symbol of Iceland’s renewed dynamism. As Harpa takes its beginning long before visitors step into the foyer, the activities of this cultural institution are merged with city life.
The assemblage of the facade is already under way and will be completed in late summer 2010. Slow poaching your cares away and daubing on white-silica mud against a backdrop that is spectacularly lunar is enough to send your endorphins hurtling into a feel-good frenzy.
Portus and Ago are owned by the Icelandic state and the City of Reykjavik through holding company East Harbour.
Alternatively, brave the cold and visit during winter - the water's always warm but your hair might just freeze.



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