There are ways around it but Photoshop CS even has code built into it that prevents you from loading or editing scans of currency. Suggest you print larger or smaller than a standard bill as I know a print shop owner that did some promotional dollar bills for a realtor and really caught hell. Your experience was with them investigating counterfeit currency, which is very different than responsible and legal film use. No serial number, noted as not legal tender, makes no reference to the ol' USofA and Ben Franklin has been given the Emmitt Kelly treatment.
The Counterfeit Detection Act of 1992, Public Law 102-550, in Section 411 of Title 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations, permits color illustrations of U.S.


Just a motion picture use disclaimer on the bill will not keep you from getting a visit from the Treasury Dept.
If what I was told by Treasury Agents is correct, duplicating ANY portion of a piece of US Currency is a no-no. Mind you I have not checked since before they changed the bills, but I haven't needed to make any for films either. Not to mention the paper I use doesn't feel a thing like the real deal, which is also important. All one needs is some extra on the film set who picks up a handful of these and decides to pass them off as real just fer shts and giggles.


Had a run in with those guys a few years back over some counterfeit bills passed through my stores. They have no sense of humor, certainly have never seen a movie, and aren't interested in any explanation, just a guilty plea.




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