N scale locomotives for sale,ho scale turntable plans,rail chiefs hope for a go signal - Easy Way

In 1971 Amtrak, “America’s Railroad”, was born, and with it was born the responsibility of maintaining America’s passenger services. Amtrak continued to operate the “El Capitan” and “Super Chief” trains in combined consists for a number of years before retiring the historic “El Capitan” name, but the legacy of the train’s double decker cars would live on, both in the form of first-class “Pacific Parlour” lounge cars and in the design of the Superliners which would take form and inspiration from the Hi-level car’s revolutionary design. In the early years of Amtrak service, when the Santa Fe was transitioning to a freight-only business, Amtrak was reliant on leased motive power for pulling its trains. The return of the F7's also heralded the introduction of Amtrak's first official diesel, the SDP40F. Brand new paint and numbering for the Santa Fe Cars to represent their post-1971 appearance. Each car is equipped with low flange wheels, KATO magnetic knuckle couplers and shock absorber construction for smooth and reliable operation. Adding another axle to the 4-4-0 design gave the Ten-Wheeler extra tractive power to haul heavy loads up mountainous terrain, making it a great all-around train for freight and passenger service. In 1935 the Santa Fe inaugurated its premier first class sleeping car only train the "Super Chief". In the late 50's, the Santa Fe would run the Super Chief and El Capitan as a combined train, with consists that could vary but were often upwards of 18-20 cars.
Being long lived units, Santa Fe’s F3’s were continuously being upgraded, with late era revisions having their distinctive “chicken wire” grills replaced by the stainless steel grills that EMD was fitting on their newer F7 productions. The 2013 release has been released along with a brand new tooling type EMD F3A and F3B "late" type pair of locomotives - the first time these locomotives will be released in this style from Kato USA! Pleasure Dome with accurate "straight-shaped dome" and Sleeper-Lounge-Observation with unique illuminated "Super Chief" tailsign. Central Pacific "Jupiter"-Locomotive & Tender (N 4-4-0 America)Most of our N scale locomotives are now shipping in clear plastic boxes for display and storage convenience. Santa Fe #91 - Locomotive & Tender (N 4-4-0 America)This N scale locomotives ships in a clear plastic box for display and storage convenience.
Union Pacific® #119 - Locomotive & Tender (N 4-4-0 America)Most of our N scale locomotives are now shipping in clear plastic boxes for display and storage convenience.
By 1917, the arrival of larger and much heavier freight cars had pushed most 0-6-0 designs to their limits.
Whether you are brand new to model railroading, just coming back into the hobby after a break, or a seasoned modeling veteran, you’ve probably heard of N scale at one time or another. In the 1960’s a German company, Arnold, created the first commercially available N scale models. If you are starting out, there are a bewildering number of things involved with model railroading and it can be pretty overwhelming.
One of our main goals here at Model:160 is to provide a resource for model railroaders interested in N scale.


The N scale locomotive is based on one of the most popular locomotives ever-Fairbanks Morse's 2400 horsepower, single engine, six-axle Train Master.
Taking up among others the Santa Fe’s luxury “Super Chief” and coach class “El Capitan” trains, Amtrak quickly set about attempting to create its own image for these classic stainless trains, adorning them with bold red, white and blue stripes and the Chevron logo (known today as Phase I colors) which would be synonymous with Amtrak service for nearly three decades. The Santa Fe, wanting to differentiate their equipment that was to be used on the new Amtrak trains, began repainting the F7’s destined for Amtrak use in a new “Yellow Bonnet” scheme. The new EMD SDP40F locomotives, fitted with dual steam generators to provide the cars with hot water and heat and geared for high-speed operation, were perfectly suited to operating the Santa Fe heritage cars. The "Super Chief", often referred to as "The Train of the Stars", was frequently patronized by Hollywood stars because of its fine accommodations, fine dining and fast 39 hr 45 min trip between Chicago and Los Angeles through the rich scenery of the American Southwest.
Kato USA has put together a small video presentation featuring this combined consist, as accurately reproduced using cars from both of the classic name train series sets and their supporting add-on packs of cars. These F3’s ended up looking remarkably similar to their later built F7 cousins, though they still retained their early style roof fans.
Realizing that railroads needed bigger and more powerful switchers to handle these modern cars, the United States Railroad Administration (USRA) developed plans for an all-new 0-8-0. The diminutive size and lack of sophisticated production techniques back then resulted in models that left a lot to be desired. There is something about a tiny mechanical device with so much detail and its ability to pull a long train around a similar small landscape.
Most people that dive into N scale will admit that it can be a little intimidating at first. Keep in mind though that you could go to your local Hobby Lobby and buy a layout in a box that you can run around in circles today. For those of you already in N scale we hope you will be able to take away some new trick or technique. A number of locomotives received this scheme, and although their service on Amtrak was brief many of these Yellow bonnets were returned to the Santa Fe for freight use after 1973.
Setting a new standard for luxury rail travel, it quickly became the most recognized train in the United States with its sleek silver and red warbonnet painted F units in the lead. Click the image to the left or HERE to visit Kato USA's youtube page and see this train in motion!
These models had spartan details, weren’t always the smoothest runners and had a tendency to growl their way around a layout when they did run right. The length of the freight trains you can model is substantial – a scale mile-long train is only 33 feet in N scale. Everything seems very small and you’ll probably have a deep fear of breaking something. The level of detail, size and quantity are only limited by your wallet, skills and amount of time you can devote to this hobby.


There are a vast number of ways to complete a modeling task and while our staff and contributors have many years of collective modeling knowledge, we’re still learning and experimenting all the time. Over time though, N scale quickly came into its own and today we have advanced technologies allow for very small models that can be built with a tremendous amount of detail. H0 scale is the most popular scale today according to both the National Model Railroad Association (NMRA) and Model Railroader magazine. The support community for N scale, particularly online, is tremendous and there are a ton of people willing to pitch in and help whenever you are in a bind.
The single best piece of advice we can give (that is also the most ignored in this hobby) is to pace yourself and start small.
If you find a way that works better for you or delivers a better result, by all means use it (and let us know about it!). During the 1960’s many modelers made a gradual shift to H0 scale as it was about half the size of O, allowing more trains in a smaller space. Likewise the locomotives available today are quiet, run smoothly, and are capable of pulling very long trains – over a scale mile long or more!. H0 scale modelers enjoy a very diverse and robust number of models in nearly any prototype and road you might be interested in modeling.
DCC can also integrate with your home computer allowing computer control of everything from turnouts to signals to automated running of trains. We all have dreams of recreating that amazing full-basement layout we saw in Model Railroader magazine. Model:160 being an online resource means that this is a fluid project that can be edited and improved upon continuously. The quality of H0 scale models was evolving rapidly into something that looked more and more like the real thing. N scale also currently offers quite a bit more equipment than in the past and the number of roads available to model is fairly diverse. The reality, especially starting out, is that it is very easy to get overwhelmed and we’ve seen a LOT of people start a massive layout project and literally abandon it not even half way through.
The hard core N scale modelers are even super detailing their models with lots of tiny additional detail and weathering them with rust, dust and even graffiti all in an effort to try and emulate the real thing.



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Category: trains stores in ga | 14.03.2015


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