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The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of American City Business Journals. Under the city government, the Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners is the port authority for the Port of Long Beach. The Port of Long Beach began its Centennial celebrations anniversary on June 28, 2011, with a day of events, tours, and entertainment. Trade with seaports in East Asia makes up the largest part of shipments moving through the Port of Long Beach. The leading imports handled in the Port of Long Beach include crude oil, electronics, plastics, furniture, and clothing. The Port of Long Beach covers almost 1.3 thousand hectares of land and contains ten piers with 80 berths that are served by 66 post-Panamax gantry cranes. The Port of Long Beach has undertaken a major project to modify two aging facilities that are not efficient today. Containers moving through the Port of Long Beach make up one-third of all containers in California ports and one-quarter of all ports on the West Coast. Handling general cargo in containers, the Port of Long Beach's Pier T, Berths T132 through T140, is operated by Total Terminals International. Also handling general cargo in containers at the Port of Long Beach, International Transportation Service operates the terminal at Pier G, Berths G226 through G236. The berths at the Port of Long Beach's Pier G International Transportation Service terminal are equipped with 17 gantry cranes.
The Pacific Container Terminal at the Port of Long Beach is operated by Pacific Maritime Services, handling general cargo in containers. The berths at the Port of Long Beach's Pacific Container Terminal are equipped with 15 gantry cranes, nine with reach of 24 containers across and six with outreach of 20 containers across. At Pier A, Berths A88 through A96, SSAT Long Beach LLC operates the SSA Terminals at the Port of Long Beach, handling general cargo in containers. The Port of Long Beach's SSA Terminals also has facilities at Pier C, Berths C60 through C62, that handle containerized general cargo and automobiles. The berths at this SSA Terminals facility in the Port of Long Beach are equipped with three gantry cranes with outreach of 17 containers across.
The Port of Long Beach has seven major terminals for dry bulk cargoes that are measured by volume (usually tons) rather than by count (as for containers).
Handling gypsum, Georgia-Pacific Gypsum operates the terminal at the Port of Long Beach's Pier D, Berth D46. Koch Carbon operates a terminal at the Port of Long Beach's Pier F Berth F211 that handles petroleum coke and prilled sulfur.
Metro Ports operates the Port of Long Beach terminal at Pier G, Berths G212 through G215, handling petroleum coke, coal, soda ash, borax, potash, sodium sulfate, concentrates, and prilled sulfur. The Port of Long Beach's Metro Ports terminal has two electric traveling bulk ship-loaders. The Port of Long Beach's Pier F, Berth F208, is operated by Mitsubishi Cement Corporation to handle bulk cement.
Also handling cargoes of bulk cement in the Port of Long Beach, CEMEX USA operates the terminal at Pier D, Berth D32. Handling bulk salt, the Port of Long Beach's Pier F Berth210 is operated by Morton Salt Company. The Crescent Warehouse Company operates a forest terminal at Pier D Berths D50-D54 in the Port of Long Beach. The Fremont Forest Group Corporation operates a terminal at Pier T Berth T122 in the Port of Long Beach to handle lumber and lumber products. At Pier T Berth T118, SA Recycling LLC operates the Port of Long Beach's SA Recycling Terminal handling recyclable metals and steel products.
The Weyerhaeuser Company operates a terminal for lumber and lumber products at Pier T Berth T122 in the Port of Long Beach.
The Port of Long Beach has seven major liquid bulk terminals handling cargoes that include, but are not limited to, crude oil, gasoline, and a range of chemicals. At the Port of Long Beach's Pier D Berths D30 and D31, Baker Commodities operates the terminal handling tallow, coconut oil, and cottonseed oil.
Handling crude oil and petroleum products in the Port of Long Beach, BP Pipelines North America operates the terminal at Pier T Berth T121. BP Pipelines North America also operates the Port of Long Beach terminal at Pier B Berths B76 through B80. Handling petroleum products and bunker fuel, Chemoil Marine Terminal is located at the Port of Long Beach's Pier F Berths F209 and F211. Petro-Diamond Terminal Company operates the terminal at the Port of Long Beach's Pier B Berths B82 and B83. Handling crude oil, petroleum products, and bunker fuel, Tesoro Refining and Marketing operates the Port of Long Beach terminal at Pier B Berths B84 through B87. The Vopak Terminal Long Beach, operated by Vopak North America, handles miscellaneous liquid bulk cargoes in the Port of Long Beach. American Marine Corporation provides specialty services such as marine contracting, commercial diving, and vessel support to the Port of Long Beach. Pacific Tugboat Services offers ocean and harbor towing, crewboat and launch services, freight-hauling and material-expediting, marine transport and construction, and ship assist services in the Port of Long Beach.
Sea Tow Services supports the Port of Long Beach's recreational boating community by providing marine assistance and boating safety services.
The Intermodal Container Transfer Facility (ICTF) serves both the Port of Long Beach and the Port of Los Angeles to support the efficient flow of cargo through the ports. The ICTF maintains an accurate inventory of containers in the facility through its Optimization Alternative Strategic Intermodal Scheduler (OASIS). The ICTF serving the Port of Long Beach and the Port of Los Angeles operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The ICTF ensures maximum efficiency for the Port of Long Beach through its suite of container-moving equipment.
The Marine Exchange of Southern California is a non-profit organization that strives to develop and ensure the efficient flow of maritime commerce in the region. The Port of Long Beach is a huge busy place that supports the region's economy and provides essential services for shippers, manufacturers, importers, exporters, and non-commercial boaters. The Port of Long Beach has adopted a Green Port Policy with the aim of minimizing or eliminating detrimental environmental impacts from port activities.
Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, work together to move two logs and a Stryker tire onto and then over a storage container during “Banner Week” competitions Dec. Fort Carson Soldiers tested their strength, endurance, knowledge and accuracy during a “Banner Week” battalion competition Dec. Leaders of 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, said they hope to make the event a battalion tradition. On the first day of Banner Week, platoons marched with rucksacks through 10 stations spread out in the nearby training area. Soldiers completed a weapons assemble and disassemble, treated three casualties and called in a MedEvac, carried four Soldiers on litters for 200 meters, moved 50 sandbags 100 meters, set up two different types of radios and climbed a steep hill twice wearing an M40-series protective mask.
Squads competed in a mystery shoot at the range and a squad Field Leaders Reaction Course lane in the training area during the second day of the competition. The mystery shoot challenged Soldiers to fire and clear an M249 squad automatic weapon and engage targets with an M4 carbine rifle using their dominant and nondominant hands while moving around cover.
In the Field Leaders Reaction Course lane, squads were required to move themselves, two logs and a Stryker tire onto and then over a storage container in less than 10 minutes without anyone or anything touching the ground within 6 feet of the container. The third day of the competition involved the individual competitions of combatives, functional fitness, weight lifting, land navigation, swimming with a combat load and rucksack, and a warrior skills lane. On the final day, leaders from each company raced through a challenge similar to the platoon course from the first day of the competition.


Soldiers patiently stood in firm ranks to learn whose hard work would be rewarded after the competition completed on the final day.
This Department of Defense print and online newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Published by Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group a private firm in no way connected with the U.S.
The appearance of advertising in this publication does not constitute endorsement by the Department of the Army, Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group of the products or services advertised.
Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. Since 1916, the Board has been responsible for promoting, developing, and setting policy for the Port of Long Beach and for managing the Harbor Department. Second only to Los Angeles as the busiest port in the United States, it is the world's 18th busiest container port.
Measured by tonnage, the Port of Long Beach's major trading partners include China, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Viet man, Taiwan, Iraq, Indonesia, Ecuador, and Australia.
The major exports moving through the Port of Long Beach are petroleum coke and petroleum bulk, chemicals, waste paper, and foods. The Port of Long Beach's major trading partners are located in East Asia, accounting for over 90% of the shipments passing through the port.
The nine-year project will accommodate increasing cargo-handling demands, provide about 14 thousand new jobs, and improve air quality in the area.
Of those cranes, six have outreach of 19 containers across, seven have outreach of 16 containers across, and four have outreach of 13 containers across. The terminal contains almost 30 hectares of open storage area and ground capacity for ten thousand TEUs, including 240 reefer outlets, 3600 FEU chassis slots, and 504 FEU chassis stacked vertically. The terminal has capacity to store 3001 wheeled imports, 6228 TEUs ground imports, and 6088 TEUs of empty containers. This Port of Long Beach terminal has capacity for storing 24 thousand TEUs and is equipped with 652 reefer outlets.
The terminal includes 23.2 hectares of open storage area in the Port of Long Beach with capacity for 4000 grounded TEUs.
Dry bulk cargoes moving through the Port of Long Beach include things like gypsum, petroleum coke, grains, and salt.
With designed capacity for five thousand tons per hour, its actual performance (working 16 hours per day) has been from 2500 to 3500 tons per hour. The terminal covers 4.2 acres and contains 168 meters (550 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 12 meters (40 feet). The terminal covers two acres and contains 270 meters (680 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 11 meters (36 feet). The terminal covers over five acres and contains 213 meters (700 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Smith Stevedoring at the Port of Long Beach's Pier F Berths F204 and 205 at the Crescent Terminal. Covering an area of 13.3 acres, the berths are 723 meters (2370 feet) long with alongside depth of 11 meters (36 feet).
The terminal covers 22 acres, and the berths are 366 meters (1200 feet) long with alongside depth of 9.8 meters (32 feet). Covering 17 acres, the Fremont forest terminal's berths are 183 meters (600 feet) long with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet).
The terminal covers an area of 16 acres, and its berths are 274 meters (900 feet) long with alongside depth of 11 meters (36 feet).
The terminal covers one acre and contains 213 meters (700 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 13 meters (43 feet).
The terminal covers about six acres and contains 347 meters (1140 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 23.2 meters (76 feet). The terminal handles petroleum products that include gasoline, blending stocks, MtBE, diesel, naphtha jet fuel, fuel oils, carbon black, and crude oil. The terminal covers five acres, and it contains 244 meters (800 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 12.2 meters (40 feet). Handling gasoline, ethanol, blend stocks, diesel, and biodiesel, the terminal covers six acres and contains 323 meters (1060 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 11.6 meters (38 feet). The terminal covers 11 acres and contains 604 meters (1980 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 15.8 meters (52 feet). Located at the Port of Long Beach's Pier S, Berth S101, the terminal ten acres and includes 213.4 meters (700 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 11 meters (36 feet). Amnav Maritime Services provides ship-assist, barge and tanker escorts, shipyard vessel assist, over-sized equipment logistics, and vessel and barge towing services in the Port of Long Beach. Foss Maritime Company provides a variety of services in the Port of Long Beach that include ship assist and tanker export, ocean and harbor towing, shipyard services, lighterage and bulk handling, bunker and petroleum transportation, project cargo and logistics, and emergency response (rescue and repair). Vessel Assist, the "Boat Owners' Auto Club," also serves the private and recreational boating communities in the Port of Long Beach. Located between the two ports at the "Terminal Island Freeway" where State Highway 103 ends, the ICTF occupies about 148 acres owned by the Port of Los Angeles.
Two major factors help the ICTF handle tremendous volumes of containers for the Port of Long Beach. Each parking space is coded so that containers can be assigned, and containers entering the facility can be logged. This includes two Mi-Jack 1200 overhead cranes, seven Mi-Jack 1000 overhead cranes, and one Mi-Jack 850 crane.
Maintaining records of ship arrivals and departures since 1923, they have created the Maritime Information Center for the Los Angeles-Long Beach Port Complex.
One of the best ways to learn about the Port of Long Beach is by joining one of the free community harbor tours offered on the first and third Saturdays and the second and fourth Tuesdays from May through September. A leader among world ports, the Port of Long Beach was first to implement a Green Flag vessel speed reduction air quality program and Green Leases with environmental Covenants.
They flipped a tractor tire 100 meters, carried several logs for 100 meters and performed 25 squats with the logs and negotiated onto and over a storage container obstacle before reaching the finish line of the platoon event. A single item of memorization decided the victory for Soldiers of Company A as they swept the titles of best squad, platoon and company within the battalion. Contents of the Mountaineer are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. The Port of Long Beach moves the full range of cargoes from clothing to consumer electronics. The Port of Long Beach's top trading partners include China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, and Malaysia.
There is open storage area of 1.1 thousand square meters (12 thousand square feet) at the berth. The Port of Long Beach will combine the two facilities into one state-of-the-art terminal, upgrade wharves and storage, and expand the on-dock rail yard. The terminal is equipped with 14 gantry cranes with outreach capacity of 22 containers across. This Port of Long Beach terminal contains 35 hectares of open storage with capacity for 12.8 thousand TEUs, including 384 reefer outlets and 4000 TEU chassis slots.
This Port of Long Beach terminal has eleven 40-long-ton and seven 30-long-ton transtainers. This Port of Long Beach terminal is served by on-dock rail transfer facilities and equipped with seven gantry cranes.
This Port of Long Beach terminal offers complete reefer container service, including 685 wheeled reefer outlets. The G-P Gypsum terminal in the Port of Long Beach is equipped with an adjustable elevated receiving hopper with an elevated electric belt conveyor system that connects the berth with a 40-thousand-ton capacity storage building.


The terminal has 6.7 acres of open storage area in the Port of Long Beach where petroleum coke is received, stored, blended, and loaded petroleum coke. Its traveling distance is 213.4 meters (700 feet), and its designed capacity is 3500 tons per hour.
With warehouse capacity for 52 thousand metric tons of bulk cement, this Port of Long Beach terminal has two pneumatic ship unloaders with capacity for 800 and 180 metric tons per hour. It includes 2.7 acres of open storage area, and a packaging plant is adjacent to this Port of Long Beach terminal. This Port of Long Beach terminal covers an area of 21 acres, and the berths are a total 386 meters (1265 feet) long with alongside depth of 11 meters (36 feet). The pier also has a 45.7-meter (150-foot) notched wharf for barges and lumber-handling equipment.
The wharf area of 1.2 acres includes a shore-side vessel loading crane and rail connections. Two six-inch pipelines link the Port of Long Beach's Berth D30 to storage tanks with total capacity for 6.7 million gallons. The terminal covers about 18 acres and contains 671 meters of berths (2200 feet) with alongside depth of 14 meters (46 feet).
The Chemoil Marine Terminal facility in the Port of Long Beach can store 425 thousand barrels and is equipped with a pipeline system serving ships, barges, trucks, and railcars. Pipeline connections to this Port of Long Beach terminal allow petroleum products to be transferred to most Los Angeles basin refiners and common carrier pipelines.
The terminal can discharge 32 thousand barrels per hour and can store up to 245 thousand barrels in the Port of Long Beach. Covering 168 acres, this Port of Long Beach terminal has 396 meters (1300 feet) of berths with alongside depth of 11.6 meters (38 feet).
The company's fleet of accommodation work barges is used in the Port of Long Beach to supplement offshore engineering, construction, accommodations, and storage capacity.
The company also offers support for marine construction, salvage, emergency response efforts, and military operations in the Port of Long Beach. Vessels fitted with the latest deck gear, navigation equipment, and electronics have earned the highest average bollard pull per tug. The Union Pacific Railroad operates the ICTF under a sublease with the Joint Powers Authority.
The Union Pacific's Dolores Support Yard is the company's locomotive maintenance facility and temporary storage facility for trains. ICTF hostlers have on-board computers that allow real-time updates of container movements within the yard, vastly improving the ICTF's ability to manage traffic flows efficiently and accurately. The ICTF is completely fenced, and it boasts tower-controlled locking gates, 22 closed-circuit cameras that monitor the perimeter and yards, and roving security officers. Their website offers information on schedules, arrival times, ship locations, and other important data. Tours are posted a month in advance on the first Monday of each month at 8am when reservations are accepted, and those wishing to join the tour can make their reservation online. The Port of Long Beach is also outfitting the container terminals with shore power so that vessels can plug into land-based power rather than burn diesel fuel while docked. Specialized terminals in the Port of Long Beach handle automobiles, petroleum, lumber, steel, cement, and many other products. Outside East Asia, the Port of Long Beach also has strong trade relationships with Mexico, Iraq, and Ecuador. This Port of Long Beach terminal contains 108.1 hectares of open storage areas that include 1850 reefer outlets and on-dock rail with capacity for four trains. The terminal has a Container Freight Station of 6.5 thousand square meters (70 thousand square feet) and on-dock rail service. Of these cranes, two have reach of 22 containers across and five have reach of 17 containers across. Handling bulk gypsum, the Port of Long Beach National Gypsum terminal contains 1.5 acres of open storage area and is equipped with an elevated electric belt conveyor system that extends to a 40-thousand tons capacity storage building.
It also offers terminal services for both imports and exports of prilled sulfur and other bulk cargoes.
Working 16 hours per day, the actual performance for Loader 1 is from 1500 to 2000 tons per hour.
Its screw-type unloader can move from 600 to 800 tons per hour and unloads to a conveyor system connected to the silos. The berth is equipped with a movable incline elevated electric belt conveyor system with a receiving hopper that connects the wharf to a stockpile area. This Port of Long Beach breakbulk terminal is served by rail connections and is home to special stevedoring equipment. Storage tanks are provided at the ARCO facilities in Carson and in the Port of Long Beach's inner harbor via 24-inch and 42-inch pipelines. This Port of Long Beach facility has capacity to store 1.8 million barrels and is connected to other companies by several pipelines. It also has pipeline connections to the Carson tank farm that provides petroleum products to most of the refiners and terminals in the LA Basin.
This Port of Long Beach terminal has total storage capacity for 15 million gallons of product. The Millennium fleet provides dependable efficient services to the Port of Long Beach's pilots and customers alike. The OASIS system consists of on-board computers for 59 hostler tractors and five yard-check vehicles. The ten added tracks at the Dolores Support Yard can accommodate another 169 double-stack cars. Jacobsen offers 19 pilots and 11 boatmen that average about seven thousand ship movements per year.
Partnering with the United States Coast Guard, the Marine Exchange's Vessel Traffic Section provides important notices, operating rules, user fees, and real-time information on vessel traffic. The Port of Long Beach is an important component of Southern California's regional economy, supporting 30 thousand jobs in the City of Long Beach, 316 thousand jobs in the region, and some 1.4 million jobs across the country.
The Port of Long Beach's Pacific Container Terminal also offers an on-dock rail container transfer facility.
Two 8-inch dock hoses connect to two 10-inch dock lines that can receive as much as 12 thousand barrels per hour. The terminal contains 110 acres of open storage area and transit shed area of 3.4 acres in the Port of Long Beach. In May 2006, the Gate Allocation Program began to limit in-gate arrivals to 1500 per day to ensure the even flow of traffic. The ICTF has five areas for parking containers that contain 2800 container stalls, 164 with refrigeration hook-ups.
As the Secretariat for the Port of Long Beach Harbor Safety Committee, the website has the latest Harbor Safety Plan, tug bollard pull information, and safety notices.
Tours validate parking for a reduced rate of $1 for the first two hours and $2 for each additional 20 minutes. In addition to being served by a rail spur, the terminal includes an office building, processing buildings, a body shop, and a car wash.



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