Wood stain vs finish, water based wood filler product - Reviews

Categories: Woodworking Plans Corner Desk | Author: admin 21.05.2013

Woods like cherry, pine and birch can become blotchy and unattractive when stained, unless you use a sealer before staining.
After the test board dries, examine the results in different light and locations to see which amount of stain gives the most appealing results. Test different sheens and types of finish on your test piece to see what your project will actually look like finished. When staining or painting any piece of furniture black or a very dark color make sure you have a few good light sources directed on every side of the piece.  This way you can see if you are covering the surface completely and catch any drips before they dry.
It is GONE!  The trim and walls have been painted, new wood blinds, furniture, and lamps added.  The black stained side table and rug are the only elements that were existing. One of the biggest projects I set out to finish this summer was staining the kitchen cabinets (taking them from golden oak to a warm mocha brown). I took on Test 3 after Mary pointed out in the comments of test 2 that the streakiness that I was still observing after 3 coats of the water-based stain by General Finishes was probably due to the consistency of the stain itself. Just like with test 2, I applied three coats of stain with an old sock over the course of 5 days.
Shown again, the gel stain is on the left here, whereas the streaky wood stain is on the right of this photo. One of the biggest concerns I had in tackling this project Monica’s way (light sanding, heavy stain application) was that the stain finish was going to look too opaque, too thick, gloppy, or instead of like stain, heavy like paint. Wood finishing expert Bruce Johnson shares basic wood staining tips and offers advice on how to stain some of the more popular wood species. While wood in its natural state can provide breathtaking beauty, it doesn't always match the other colours or wood tones in our home. Since wood is a product of nature, it can vary from tree to tree, even in the same wood species.
Give you a longer working time, enabling you to stain floors, cabinets, paneling and doors without the worry of dried lap marks.
This thick-bodied stain is ideal for vertical application and works on both wood and non-wood surfaces. Sand bare or stripped wood lightly with #150, #180 or #220-grit sandpaper to open the pores in preparation for staining.
Pay attention to how long you leave the stain on the wood before wiping off any unabsorbed liquid. Remove the last of any unabsorbed stain with a dry cloth wiped only in the direction of the grain of the wood.
When staining vertical surfaces, such as unfinished paneling or doors, try Minwax® Gel Stain.


All woods have two characteristics that play important roles in determining their final appearance: their natural colour and the size of their pores. In addition to their natural colour, each species of wood has unique properties that will also affect the staining results. Always a popular hardwood, oak has a strong grain pattern and large, open pores that absorb stain readily.
These hardwoods share many of the characteristics of oak and should be stained in the same manner described above for oak.
As its name implies, hard maple is an extremely dense, tight-pored wood that does not absorb much stain.
These three popular softwoods are beautiful when finished naturally or with only a light application of stain. Always prepare the wood with a light sanding and an application of Minwax® Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner (see Wood Preparation for other tips). Attempt to obtain a darker colour by allowing any unabsorbed stain to dry on top of the wood, as this will later peel off. Make sure you stir the stain well before applying.  Dip tip of brush into can and start from the center of your piece out to the edges using long light strokes. The thick application of multiple coats of the gel stain does not impair or inhibit the way that texture shows through, and that really helps to keep this technique desirable. For the best results, select a pre-stain wood conditioner, stain and finish with the same solvent.
Applying stain over a finished surface, such as lacquered kitchen cabinets, will not change the colour of the wood.
On woods with large, open pores, such as oak, mahogany and ash, increase your pressure to work the stain into the pores. Swirl marks left by a stain-saturated cloth will become even more obvious under a coat of clear finish. Its thicker consistency enables it to cling to vertical surfaces without immediately running, giving you more time to apply an even coat of stain.
Once the stain has dried, apply a clear finish to protect both the stain and the wood — and to make the final results look even more beautiful. Unlike paint, both water-based and oil-based stains are absorbed into the wood rather than laying on top of it. Like hard maple, however, it does not absorb stain evenly and should not be stained with dark coloured stains.
Unlike oak and ash, cherry has a subtle grain pattern and small pores which do not absorb as much stain, making it difficult to make any significant changes in its natural colour.


Unlike oak and ash, the grain pattern of maple is uneven, causing it to absorb stains in varying degrees. Problems arise, however, under darker stains, for all three absorb stain unevenly, especially around knots and blemishes. The solvent in the finish will activate the damp stain, allowing your brush or cloth to pull it out of the pores of the wood. They are clean lined and classic.  The natural pine finish just had to be changed to be updated to  look  more modern.
I have also used this stain successfully with a Wooster bristle brush made specifically for staining.
The finished product is really smooth, the bevels in the wood appear to have taken the stain evenly (a problem I cited during my report of test 1), and up close, the cabinets look good.
Rubbing or brushing against the direction of the grain will help fill deep pores with stain. For that reason, the natural wood colour will blend with the colour of the stain you choose.
To help reduce blotchiness when staining, first apply a liberal coat of a pre-stain wood conditioner. When staining, first apply a pre-stain wood conditioner, then select stains lighter in colour. Always apply a liberal coat of Minwax® Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner prior to staining and even then select light to medium colours.
Never allow any excess stain to dry on wood surface—it will cause all sorts of adhesion and other issues. In order to accurately predict the final colour of your project, always test any stain you select on an inconspicuous place on the wood first.
To insure that any stain penetrates and fills oak's deep pores, apply a liberal amount of stain to the wood, then work it into the pores using a cloth in a swirling motion.
Afterwards remove any unabsorbed stain by rubbing a clean cloth in the direction of the grain of the board.



Wooden range hood ideas
Furniture stain wax
Woodworking desk plans
Free puzzle rocking chair plans
Fort leonard wood housing floor plans


Comments: