Hammer jointer planer, bunk bed diy ideas - Plans Download

Categories: Wood Shoe Rack Plans | Author: admin 10.06.2015

Its two jointer tables lift up at once, making it very quick to change over to planing mode.
BStev writes: For those of you blaming FWW for the Facebook decision, read again because Hammer is the one making that requirement. This final installment in the series will discuss changing blades in the Hammer A3-31 and some summary thoughts on jointer-planer combo machines. Now for a look at the parts and systems of the Hammer A3-31 that can be adjusted and tuned, with particular consideration to the ease, accuracy, and durability of the adjustments. Unfortunately, the Setup Guide, which covers these adjustments and is available as a pdf on the Hammer website, is out of date (copyright 2005).
I called Hammer this week in anticipation of this post, and they favorably received my suggestion to update the Setup Guide.
The most welcome feature is that the adjustments hold solidly over time and when converting back and forth from jointer to planer mode. For edge jointing the guard can be adjusted laterally to expose the minimum width of cutterhead. To solve this problem, I wonder if Hammer could include a short axle to attach to the base perpendicular to the jointer bed to be used with a matching cleat. For a given quality level, having used the Inca for many years, and now the Hammer, I say the answer is yes.
In the previous post in this series, I recounted my stock preparation history culminating with the Hammer A3-31.
Doing it all by hand is just too slow and tedious for most of us, but a hybrid approach employing a portable thickness planer is very practical.
The big problem here is that jointers with widths that approach even inexpensive portable thickness planers are big and expensive.


In a single machine with a fairly small footprint, you get an excellent 12″ of planing and matching jointing capacity.
There is a range of prices starting at about $1800 up to twice that, among options that include Rikon, Grizzly, Jet, Rojek, Minimax and Hammer. So, I got one of those ubiquitous cast iron 6″ jointers, and rigged up a marginally effective way to also use it as a thicknesser. Keep in mind that with a thickness planer as the only machine available, the initial jointing of one face by hand (which, again, I’d rather not do!) only has to produce a surface that will sit on the planer bed without twist, bow, or flex.
For a given board width and species, planing with the A3-31 with conventional blades is a lot quieter than with my DeWalt 735 planer even with the excellent Shelix cutterhead.
For the reasons explained in this series, I highly recommend a 12″ jointer-planer combination machine for the small shop woodworker. For most fence positions, the net depth of the unit is about the same with the jointer beds down or raised. A Felder 12″ jointer-planer lists at over $7000 (ouch, my hand just cramped up at the keyboard), which is more than twice the price of the Hammer A3-31. It might work only with the jointer beds raised but that would be good enough to just get the machine through narrow doors.
Prior to discussing the ins and outs of the Hammer machine, let’s look at the rationale for a combination jointer-planer in the small shop. One face is made flat but very rough using scrub and jack planes, just enough so it does not rock or distort on the planer bed, and there is no bow (lengthwise curve on the face). I will say that I really appreciate the extra two inches and extra beefiness of my current Hammer over the 10″ Inca I had.
I made the case several years ago for a portable jointer-planer as an excellent choice for a first machine for small-shop woodworkers making furniture and accessories.


It can be ugly with tearout, scrub plane gutters, or whatever; it just has to register on the bed so the planer can produce a flat surface on the opposite face. To my mind, this is like have a concavity along the full length of a jointer plane sole and would make accurate jointing difficult at best.
Fortunately, Hammer makes knowledgeable technicians available by phone who were generous with their time in helping me understand the machine.
I always use paddles for face jointing and it is easy to pass the board under the narrow guard, which is height-adjustable using the knob at the far left in the photo below. I figure that the expertise and institutional experience applied to the Felder line must bleed over into the Hammer line. The planer flattens the opposite face, the board is then flipped and the planer makes the first face flat and parallel. By contrast, changing blades on the Tersa cutterhead that was in the Inca jointer-planer was almost unbelievably easy and fast. Hand adjusted parts, such as the planer bed adjustment are very smooth, and the machine runs with that nice low hum suggestive of quality.
In my opinion, there is no need to have the entire board length supported on either the infeed or outfeed table to do accurate jointing.
The OEM system on the Dewalt DW735 planer was quite easy, and now with the Shelix cutterhead with carbide-tipped inserts installed, changing blades is practically a non-issue. Still, I was stuck with only 6″ of machine jointing capacity and, despite trying the workarounds found in the tips sections of magazines, I was still doing too much hand work and longed for more machine jointing width, especially since I enjoy using fairly wide boards in my projects.



Best wood lathe value
Decorative woodwork supply
Making wood varnish
Make your own wine rack wall


Comments: