Green wood stain fungus, woodworkersworld.net review - For You

Categories: Wood Wine Rack Plans | Author: admin 05.02.2015

This month's fungus is the beautiful blue-green cup-fungus Chlorociboria aeruginascens and its close relative, Chlorociboria aeruginosa. It's actually a very common fungus, although it is more common to see the green stained wood than to actually see the fruiting bodies. They are members of the Ascomycota, belonging to the family Helotiaceae of the order Helotiales, which includes other cup fungi such as the yellow Bisporella citrina and the purple Ascocoryne sarcoides.
The stunning blue-green Chlorociboria cups can be stalked or unstalked and are 2 - 6 mm in diameter.
The growth conditions for wood colonization are largely unknown and are being studied by scientists at the Center for Forest Mycology Research in the Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory of the U.S. This fungus is the beautiful blue-green cup-fungus Chlorociboria aeruginascens and its close relative, Chlorociboria aeruginosa. These two fungi are distributed throughout the temperate forests of the world and are the only two species of Chlorociboria found in North America.
The stunning blue-green Chlorociboria cups can be stalked or unstalked and are 2 – 6 mm in diameter. A fascinating post Julie, I would love to see it, quite a spectacular fungus and so much information on it.


Just had to pop back as I’ve just read Julie’s post on the blue-green staining fungi!!!! Thanks for a great post this morning, Julie – Tunbridge Wells was my home town, but, unfortunately, don’t possess any of the Tunbridge Ware!
Julie what an interesting Post this morning – I had never heard of it but will be looking out for green wood in the Greenwoods!! We had a lovely cat years ago that needed to stay at the Vets – he had diabetes and they need to asses him for insulin dosage which is very tricky in cats. Most of the time you don't see the actual fruiting bodies but the brilliantly green-stained wood of hardwoods, including poplar, aspen, oak and ash. It’s actually a very common fungus, although it is more common to see the green stained wood than to actually see the fruiting bodies.
The operculate cup fungi in the order Pezizales are much more well known and include morels, black tulip fungus, and various kinds of faerie cups, such as Microstoma floccosum, Aleuria aurantia, Sarcoscypha occidentalis, and Geopyxis carbonaria.
New Zealand has 15 species, some of which like highly rotted wood while others prefer harder wood. Most of the time you don’t see the actual fruiting bodies but the brilliantly green-stained wood of hardwoods, including poplar, aspen, oak and ash.


This pigment exists in several different forms of various colors within the wood cells; the combination of a yellow-orange form with a blue-green form results in the dazzling blue-green coloration of the colonized wood. Robert Blanchette at the University of Minnesota showed that 14th and 15th century Renaissance Italian craftsmen used the wood to provide the green colors in their intricate inlaid intarsia designs. It is also possible that they do not degrade the cell wall directly but colonize wood decayed by other fungi earlier in the decay process.
It may make wood less appealing to termites, and has been studied for its cancer-fighting properties.
Using electron microscopy, he was able to show that green-colored wooden splinters taken from the Italian artwork were identical to Chlorociboria-colonized wood obtained in modern northern Minnesota. In the 18th century, English woodworkers in the town of Tunbridge Wells, Kent, started using small splinters and veneers of the green-stained wood to form highly detailed pictures of animals, flowers, local landscapes, and geometric designs, which were often inset into the lids of small wooden boxes.



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