30.06.2014

What headache medicine can u take when pregnant

Find out why you may feel more spacey and forgetful during pregnancy and what you can do about it. Find out why you have to pee every ten seconds now that you're pregnant and when it might signal a problem. Find out why ibuprofen is generally not recommended during pregnancy and what we know about its safety. See what our expert has to say about whether acetaminophen (Tylenol) is safe for pregnant women. Inconvenient and embarrassing as they can be, nosebleeds are a perfectly normal pregnancy symptom. Learn why you may have patches of darker skin during pregnancy (chloasma) and what you can do about it.
Learn why pregnancy makes you more susceptible to varicose veins and spider veins and what you can do about them. Track your baby's development Get expert guidance from the world's #1 pregnancy and parenting resource, delivered via email, our apps and website. Many women, even those who haven't previously experienced a lot of everyday headaches, will get them during pregnancy. For sinus headaches: Try steam inhalation to relieve congestion and using a humidifier to add moisture to the air. Find Out What Medications Are Safe And Unsafe During Pregnancy, Including A List Of Alternative Treatments To Treat Common Pregnancy Ailments. Elizabeth Weiss McGolerickA word of caution: Always check with your obstetrician before taking any medication, embarking on exercise routines or getting massage, acupuncture or chiropractic treatment while pregnant. Pain relievers during pregnancyAspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, found in OTC medications like Excedrin Migraine, Aleve, Advil and Motrin, are common drugs that pregnant women simply cannot take, says Rebecca Kolp, associate director of gynecology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Alternative methods to manage pain during pregnancyThere are natural ways to diminish pain.
Tanese suggests pregnant women look for a chiropractor with specialized training in pregnancy care and experience caring for pregnant patents. Alternative methods during pregnancyFor constipation, Raupp recommends a daily cup of dandelion root tea or a mug of hot water with juice from a lemon. Cold medicines while pregnantThere’s nothing worse than having a cold while pregnant but over-the-counter (OTC) cold, cough or flu remedies are off-limits to pregnant women. Don’t confuse a cold with nasal congestion, something quite common among pregnant moms due to an increase of mucous membranes.
Alternative methods for cold relief during pregnancyIf you do have the sniffles, “Use a Neti Pot to clear up nasal congestion, flush bacteria from your sinuses and nix a post-nasal drip or sore throat,” says Raupp.


Nicotine patches and gum during pregnancyIf you’re a smoker, kick the habit before even becoming pregnant. Herbal remedies during pregnancyMany herbal and natural remedies are safe during pregnancy, but many are dangerous. Here are a few reasons why headaches during pregnancy are common and what you can do about them. The vast majority of pregnancy headaches are a pain — but not serious or anything to worry about. You can also apply hot and cold compresses the achy spot, alternating 30 seconds of each for a total of 10 minutes, four times a day.
The low blood sugar that results from skipping meals can trigger a headache, as can the crash-and-burn that comes after eating a lot of sweets. Some foods (including chocolate, cheese, ice cream and processed meats) can trigger headaches.
Avoid hot, stuffy spaces and strong odors (you're more sensitive to them than ever), and dress in layers so you can start peeling them off before overheating leads to a headache.
Fluorescent lighting, windowless work spaces can trigger headaches, so take whatever steps you can to control your environment — or at least take breaks from it as frequently as you can.
Noise can give you a headache (duh!); if you're extra-sensitive to loud noises you can make it a point to avoid the worst offenders (the mall, loud parties, boisterous restaurants). To prevent stress from building up into a headache, take a prenatal yoga class, meditate, or do some breathing exercises — anything that'll help you relax. Digestion slows so the body can absorb more nutrients from food leaving mommies-to-be with indigestion, heartburn, constipation, bloating, gas and irregular bowel movements.
Products like Nicorette gum and Nicoderm patches are not generally recommended during pregnancy because they come with their own risks because they still contain nicotine which is harmful to your baby.
Raupp advises pregnant women to avoid herbs that affect hormone levels and induce uterine contractions: borage, dong quai, licorice, cohosh, mistletoe, myrrh, sage, turmeric and vitex. If you've always been susceptible to tension headaches, pregnancy can make the problem worse.Experts don't know exactly why carrying a child tends to make your head ache more often, but one good guess is the hormonal free-for-all that's taking place in your body. But if your headaches persist for more than four hours or you have other symptoms (fever, visual disturbances, sudden dramatic weight gain, or puffiness in your face or hands), call your practitioner. By keeping track of the foods, you may discover some are linked to your headache patterns – and you can cut those edibles out of your diet. It’s natural to turn to the medicine cabinet at the first sign of a headache, indigestion or sniffle. Tension headaches can be relieved by lying on the floor and massaging the back of your neck with two tennis balls wrapped in a sock.


Do not take castor oil or herbal laxatives like aloe vera, buckthorn, butternut and cascara sagrada. Your increased blood volume and circulation may also play a part, especially in early pregnancy. Fortunately there are other tactics you can take that can offer relief from recurrent headaches when you’re expecting.
And check with your doctor to see if a sinus infection may be causing your headaches or if there’s a safe nasal decongestant you can use. But when you’re pregnant, you have to think twice about using over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Here are some of the most common drugs pregnant women must avoid and alternative methods of treatment. Structurally induced symptoms are best handled through structure-improving methods.” Chiropractic care can also reduce the time of labor and delivery and reduce nausea. Experts estimate that about 1 in 5 women has a migraine headache at some time in her life, and up to 16 percent of those women get migraines for the first time when they're pregnant (most often in the first trimester).Migraine headaches cause moderate to severe throbbing pain, typically on one side of the head. When you meet with your doctor to confirm you're pregnant, ask what meds are OK to take and what meds you need to find alternatives for.
Consult your practitioner about which medications you can take if you're prone to severe migraines.If you're having frequent, debilitating headaches, the benefits of certain medications may outweigh any possible risks to your baby, although some drugs will remain strictly off-limits. A warm shower or bath can be soothing for tension headaches.Don't go hungry or thirstyTo prevent low blood sugar (a common headache trigger), eat smaller, more frequent meals. Avoid straight sugar, like candy, which can cause your blood sugar to spike and crash.And don't forget to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated as well.
If you're having a migraine, try to sleep it off in a quiet, dark room.Get some exerciseSome evidence shows that regular exercise can reduce the frequency and severity of migraines and reduce the stress that can cause tension headaches. Some women who suffer from tension headaches swear by massage, although some studies question whether it's effective in preventing or relieving headaches.Consider acupunctureAcupuncture treatment is considered safe during pregnancy, although whether it's effective for headaches is an issue of some debate. Most headaches during pregnancy are unpleasant but harmless, but a headache can be a sign of a more serious problem. If you're having a migraine or other severe headache for the first time ever, you'll need a full medical evaluation to be sure nothing else is going on.In the second or third trimester of pregnancy, a headache could be a sign of preeclampsia, a serious pregnancy-induced condition marked by high blood pressure. You might have a sinus infection that will need to be treated with antibiotics.Even if you've had headaches before, talk to your healthcare provider about them so you can decide what kind of evaluation and treatment might be best for you during your pregnancy.



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