10.02.2014

Pregnant women need a flu shot cdc

Influenza (the flu) can cause a woman to become very sick if she is pregnant (1).The best way pregnant women can protect themselves from the flu is to get a flu shot (1). Sample DemographicsA total of 2,072 women pregnant anytime between July 1-November 9, 2012 were included in the survey. Influenza (flu) can cause severe illness among pregnant women and result in preterm labor and increased risk for hospitalization and death (1).The best way for pregnant women to protect themselves from the flu is to get a flu shot (1). Tips for Mom and Mom with support throughout pregnancy through free text messages on topics like prenatal care, baby health, parenting, vaccination, and moreThe November Internet panel survey of pregnant women is designed to provide timely estimates of national flu vaccination coverage and to assess the effectiveness of current vaccination efforts. Infants younger than 6 months are also at high risk of severe illness from influenza, but they are too young to be vaccinated themselves (4).The best way to protect pregnant women from the flu is to get the flu shot every year (5-6). Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women by education, mid-November 2011, United StatesVaccination coverage among those with less than a college degree was lower than the coverage among those with a college or above a college degree, similar to the findings in the November 2010 survey.
Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women by insurance type at interview, mid-November 2011, United StatesPregnant women who reported having medical insurance at the time of interview had higher vaccination coverage than pregnant women who reported not having insurance. Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women by other high-risk conditions*, mid-November 2011, United StatesWomen with an additional high-risk condition besides pregnancy that increases the risk of severe influenza had a higher coverage than women with no other high-risk condition, similar to the results from the November 2010 survey. Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women by provider recommendation and offer, mid-November 2011, United StatesWomen who reported a provider recommended and offered influenza vaccination were twice as likely to be vaccinated as women who received a recommendation but no offer.
Main reasons reported for not receiving influenza vaccination among unvaccinated pregnant women, mid-November 2011, United StatesConcern about the safety risk to the baby if vaccinated was the most common reason reported by unvaccinated pregnant women for not receiving the influenza vaccination. Impact of influenza exposure on rates of hospital admission and physician visits because of respiratory illness among pregnant women.
Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women -- United States, 2010-11 influenza season. Flu vaccination coverage among women who reported their doctor or other medical professional both recommended and offered the flu vaccine was 73.5%, approaching the Healthy People 2020 target of 80% (6). Coverage among pregnant women 35-49 years was lower in November 2013 compared to the November 2012 survey (41.8% vs.
Women 18–49 years who were pregnant at any time since August 1, 2013, were recruited from SurveySpot, a general population Internet panel. Getting the flu shot while a woman is pregnant has also been shown to prevent influenza and flu-related hospitalizations in their infants up to 6 months of age (6-8). Women who reported receiving a recommendation but no offer were about four times as likely to be vaccinated as women who did not receive either a recommendation or an offer. Other common reasons reported included concern the vaccine would give them the flu, not getting sick from the flu or could treat the flu, not thinking the vaccine is effective in preventing the flu, and concern about safety for themselves if vaccinated.
Data Source and MethodsCDC conducted an internet panel survey during November 1-14, 2011, to provide mid-season estimates of influenza vaccination coverage and information on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to influenza vaccination among pregnant women. Yet the coverage estimates among women who reported receiving only a recommendation or not receiving a recommendation were much lower.
Experts recommend pregnant women to get a flu shot no matter how far along she is in her pregnancy (5,9).


Women 18–49 years who were pregnant at any time since August 1, 2011, were recruited from the SurveySpot panel operated by Survey Sampling International which was the same as the November survey conducted during the 2010-11 influenza season. This report provides early-flu season (early November) estimates of vaccine uptake by pregnant women so far this year. Among women who were pregnant at the time of the survey, a safety concern was the most common reason for not receiving a flu vaccination among women who were pregnant at the time of the survey (43.4%).
Eligible respondents were either pregnant at the time of the survey or had recently been pregnant.
Prior to 2009, influenza vaccination levels among pregnant women were generally low (~15%) (5,9). Final 2012-13 flu season coverage estimates for pregnant women will become available after the end of the season. Vaccination eligibility during the 2012-13 flu season was extended by a month to include vaccinations given in July-April rather than the previous August-April period.CDC analyzed data from an Internet panel survey conducted October 30-November 13, 2013, among women who were pregnant any time since August 2013. The follow-up survey in April 2013 will provide end of season flu vaccination coverage estimates.
The national Healthy People 2020 objective for pregnant women influenza vaccination is 80% (5). In the previous two seasons, vaccination coverage increased by 5-17 percentage points from early to end of the flu season (11, 12). Data Source and MethodsCDC conducted an internet panel survey during November 1-9, 2012, to provide early season estimates of flu vaccination coverage and information on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to flu vaccination among pregnant women. This report provides early flu season (early November) estimates of vaccine uptake by pregnant women. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women for the 2011-12 season, CDC analyzed data from an internet panel survey conducted in November 2011 among women pregnant any time since August 2011.
Pregnancy status questions included whether respondents were currently pregnant or pregnant at any time since August 1, 2011, and if so, what were the actual months of pregnancy. Women 18–49 years who were pregnant at any time since July 1, 2012, were recruited from a SurveySpot, a general population Internet panel, the same recruitment mechanism that was used in the November 2011 survey. Pregnancy status questions included whether respondents were currently pregnant or pregnant at any time since August 1, 2013, and if so, what were the actual months of pregnancy. Respondents were asked their beginning and end (or expected delivery) date of the pregnancy. Key FindingsBy mid-November 2011, influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women was about the same as vaccination coverage by mid-November 2010- 43.2% vs. Women who reported receiving vaccination since July 1, 2013, and who were vaccinated before or during pregnancy were counted as vaccinated. In surveys conducted prior to the 2012-13 flu season, the vaccination period was measured from August 1 until the time of survey. Pregnancy status questions included whether respondents were currently pregnant or pregnant at any time since July 1, 2012, and if so, what were the actual months of pregnancy.


Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women by age group, mid-November 2011, United StatesThe estimated coverage in 18-24 year olds was similar to the coverage in 25-49 year olds.
Additionally, published estimates prior to the April 2013 survey include vaccinations received before, during, or after pregnancy, while estimates in this report exclude vaccinations received after pregnancy.
State specific estimates of influenza vaccination coverage for the 2010-11 season will be provided later from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) (11), and national estimates from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) will also be available later for comparison to the internet panel survey estimates.The findings in the report are subject to several limitations. First, the sample is not necessarily representative of all pregnant women in the United States, because the survey was conducted among a volunteer panel rather than a randomly-selected sample. Second, all results are based on self-report and pregnancy and vaccination status were not validated by medical record review; therefore all responses are subject to recall and reporting error.
The follow-up internet panel survey in April 2013 will allow for assessment of flu vaccination coverage at the end of the flu season.
Finally, selection bias might remain after weighting adjustments, given the exclusion of women with no internet access and the self-selection processes for entry into the panel and participation in the survey. State-specific estimates of flu vaccination coverage for the 2012-13 season will be provided later from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). A difference of five percentage points was considered a notable difference.Sample DemographicsA total of 2,096 women pregnant any time from August 1-November 13, 2013, were included in the survey.
The follow-up Internet panel survey in April 2014 will assess flu vaccination coverage at the end of the flu season.
State-specific estimates of flu vaccination coverage for the 2013-14 season will be provided later from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women---National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS).
Compared with the estimates from BRFSS, estimates of flu vaccination among pregnant women from the Internet panel surveys were similar for the 2010-11 season (43.9% vs.
Seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women---10 states, 2009--10 influenza season. Monitoring seasonal influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women in the United States. Estimated Pregnancy Rates and Rates of Pregnancy Outcomes for the United States, 1990–2008. Influenza vaccination coverage estimates among pregnant women - United States, November 2010.
Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Women Who Delivered a Live-Born Infant-21 States and New York City, 2009-2010 and 2010-11 Influenza Seasons. Additionally, the 2010-11 and 2011-12 estimates counted vaccinations from August-April of each flu season.



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