21.03.2015

Does being pregnant give you gas

When you’re pregnant, your body is in one very literal sense no longer completely your own. Take this with a bit of a grain of salt: Many people were born during the Victorian era (too many, if you ask Malthus), and certainly not all of them were ill-shapen monsters because their mothers wore corsets. Though widespread corset use died out by the end of the Edwardian era, some women were fans of the corset in pregnancy even on into the 20th century, as the self-published manifesto of one Pat Carter, writing in the 1950s, attests.
Watching sports might be too exciting for a pregnant woman, according to a pregnancy advice manual from the 1940s.
There is a marvelous old superstition that persists to this day—ask any Russian baboushka or Southern grandma—that cutting your hair during pregnancy is a no-no. When women are pregnant, oftentimes their hair becomes shinier, grows faster, and is generally shampoo-commercial gorgeous (before it all falls out when the baby is about three to four months old). There is, however, one good non-medical reason not to cut your hair: Decisions made under the influence of pregnancy hormones may not be very good decisions.
Even now, some women are advised by their grandmothers and other well-meaning older folk not to raise their arms over their heads, especially in the later months of pregnancy, or risk getting the baby’s umbilical cord wrapped around its neck. Find out why you may feel more spacey and forgetful during pregnancy and what you can do about it. Find out why you have to pee every ten seconds now that you're pregnant and when it might signal a problem. Find out why ibuprofen is generally not recommended during pregnancy and what we know about its safety. See what our expert has to say about whether acetaminophen (Tylenol) is safe for pregnant women. Inconvenient and embarrassing as they can be, nosebleeds are a perfectly normal pregnancy symptom.
Learn why you may have patches of darker skin during pregnancy (chloasma) and what you can do about it. Learn why pregnancy makes you more susceptible to varicose veins and spider veins and what you can do about them. Track your baby's development Get expert guidance from the world's #1 pregnancy and parenting resource, delivered via email, our apps and website.
It almost seems that your jeans start to feel snug as soon as the pregnancy test comes back positive — and you can thank the hormone progesterone for that puffy phenomenon.
Sorry, but that ate-too-much feeling you're experiencing is likely to get worse as your uterus keeps expanding and pressing on your stomach and intestines. Wacky, embarrassing and truly gross pregnancy side effects that your doctor may forget to mention.
Sure, some moms-to-be exude a certain pregnant loveliness—until they fart in an elevator or snore like a foghorn in the night. Symptoms: Sticky white or pale yellow discharge can appear constantly during pregnancy, leaving you in frequent need of new undies. Symptoms: Bloating and sometimes painful cramping in your belly, and the urge to break wind often. Cause: The intestines are sluggish during pregnancy, thanks to all that progesterone circulating in your body. How to deal: Theoretically, treating constipation should minimize your gas and bloating, too.
Symptoms: You may feel like you have a perpetual cold, and blowing your nose gets downright gross. How to deal: Use saline nose drops before you go to sleep and during the night, if necessary.


Cause: Your metabolism is in overdrive, and extra blood pumping through your body warms the skin. But in another, more uncomfortable sense, it’s become a public entity—because complete strangers think it’s absolutely fine to comment on what you’re eating, how you’re exercising (or not, in my case), even how you’re walking. And despite explicit medical advice not to and concern that tight lacing could harm the developing fetus, not to mention all those soft lady organs in there, they often wore corsets into their pregnancies. Carter was also a proponent of the starvation diet during pregnancy as a way to “prevent the pooch,” by which we assumed she means the growing fetus. Another one from The Distaff Gospels, this claimed that “cherries, strawberries or red wine” thrown in the face of a pregnant woman would cause marks on the baby’s body. Exactly why isn’t entirely clear; some say that it’s because cutting your hair can make it drier or visiting the salon can harm your child somehow. This is down to the hormones the pregnant body produces, which also slow your hair’s falling out; it also tallies with the notion that hair equals life force, so cutting it could harm the child.
This is absolutely untrue, but if it does get you out of having to do things like hang clothes on a line, then by all means. There was a pervasive belief from antiquity on that what a pregnant woman looked at would be somehow manifest in her child. I've found people cannot resist telling cat-owning pregnant ladies that their feline companion is a toxoplasmosis-carrying assassin. You may be surprised to learn that the average person produces between 1 and 4 pints of gas each day and passes gas about 14 to 23 times a day. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare professional. While progesterone is essential for maintaining a healthy pregnancy (it is, after all, the pro-gestation hormone), it also triggers that oh-so-delightful trio: bloating, burping, and farting.
It's a bit of a pain for you (literally), but take comfort in knowing that your baby is oblivious to your discomfort.
This helps keeps things moving through your system to avoid constipation, which can aggravate bloating.
Keep a healthy level of fiber in your diet – think leafy greens, legumes, whole grains (like whole wheat bread or pasta), and fruits. Take a hint from your pregnant digestive tract, and slow it down (see, your mom was right all along). Anxious eating (lunch gobbled while you're finishing a report; dinner devoured when you're having an argument with your mother on the phone) also leads to air swallowing. Talk to your doctor if it develops a foul odor, itches, burns or becomes greenish-yellow, very thick or watery; you may have an infection. You're instructed to drink something like 64 ounces of liquid a day, and you've got an extra 10 or so pounds of baby and uterus sitting on your bladder.
In her manifesto on homebirthing, Come Gently, Sweet Lucinda, she recommended women wear boned corsets during pregnancy.
She wasn’t alone, however, in recommending that pregnant women eat even less than they did when they were not pregnant: Randi Hutter Epstein found an article from the March 1956 McCall’s magazine advocating a strict diet for expecting mothers—to keep them thin. Eating fish heads would produce a child with a trout pout, or a mouth “more turned up and pointed than normal.” And eating soft cheese would make your unborn boy’s penis small. Others, however, who are closer to the original purpose of the myth claim that you’re cutting your life-force.
According to the Trotula, a manual of women’s health of the 11th century, a woman in a difficult or not-progressing labor should be given an herbal bath, her “sides, belly, hips, and vagina be anointed with oil of violets or rose oil,” and rubbed vigorously; she should be encouraged to sneeze, usually with the judicious application of pepper, or taken on a slow walk through the house (that one is actually helpful). Once you're pregnant, you may find yourself belching or passing gas a lot more than usual or having to unbutton your pants to relieve bloating weeks before you begin to show.


He's snug as a bug in your womb, just listening to the beautiful gastric music your body is making.
Fueling up on six small meals a day or three moderate ones plus two or three snacks will not only keep your nutrition levels constant to better nourish your baby, they'll prevent your digestive system from getting overloaded, keeping gassiness in check.
If you typically scarf down your lunch in five minutes flat, you're probably swallowing a lot of air along with that food.
You don't have to give them up entirely (they're a great source of protein and other nutrients), but try not to overdo them, and stick to your pregnancy diet.
Watch your intake of the usual suspects, such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, onions and carbonated beverages.
Keep your head straight and pinch the nostrils closed until the bleeding stops, which usually takes about five minutes. Run a humidifier and prop yourself up on some extra pillows, which will relieve nighttime heartburn as well. In fact, some advice implied that smoking was actually good for you and for the expecting mother because it was so relaxing. If that didn’t help, then there was always the good old tying a snakeskin around your hips or eating some butter with special, baby-producing words carved into it. Progesterone causes the smooth muscle tissue in your body (including the gastrointestinal tract) to relax. If you're fitting fiber in for the first time in your life, introduce it slowly and gently.
The air will end up settling into your system in the form of painful gas bubbles (no pain to your baby, just you). Stop and take a few deep breaths to calm yourself before and during your meal — and remember that "lunch break" means that you're actually supposed to take a break while you eat lunch.
Other foods in the gas club include cabbage, onions, fried foods, sugary foods, and rich, buttery sauces.
Finally, try Super Kegels to improve muscle tone: Empty your bladder, tighten your pelvic floor muscles and hold (like you're holding your pee). This slows down digestion, giving the nutrients from food you eat more time to enter your bloodstream and reach your baby. Avoid those that you're probably better off avoiding anyway (like the onion rings that combine two club members in one potent dish), and moderate your intake of the others (a side of slaw, not a mound). When the muscles begin to naturally release, squeeze and tighten again until you feel a tingling sensation. Not only will you cut down on your discomfort, but you'll be giving yourself the break you deserve. The primary reason is that you have much higher levels of progesterone, a hormone that relaxes smooth muscle tissue throughout your body, including your gastrointestinal tract.
What’s more, your expanding uterus places increasing pressure on your rectum, which can wreak havoc on muscle control and lead to the passing of some serious wind. Most stomach gas results from swallowing air and is typically released by burping, though a small amount can continue down to the large intestine to be released as flatulence.Most of the gas that causes flatulence is produced when bacteria in the large intestine break down food that was incompletely digested by enzymes in the stomach and small intestine.
For example, lactose intolerant folks get bloated and gassy if they have dairy products like milk or ice cream.
Individual variation in the balance of bacteria in the colon may also affect how much gas you make.



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