The best Western and Japanese handsaws are quite thin yet in competent hands won’t kink in a cut, and the spring steel they are made from is tempered to allow sharpening with files. The tools I’ll use to remove the kink are a steel anvil and two hammers, both heavy and light, both with slightly convex faces. Removing a kink or bow requires stretching the steel surface on the concave side of the kink, and compressing the surface on the convex side.
On the identical marks on the convex side of the kink, I’ll accomplish two tasks simultaneously using light hits with the heavy hammer.
I sight down the cutting edge to insure I removed the kink and repeat the previous steps if necessary. When tensioning is complete, the saw should flex in either direction as I did at the beginning, and return to dead straight.
I have been trying to restore a lovely old one of mine, but one of the bolts refuses to budge.
I have made few very useful kitchen knives from old savaged blades from the tip, very good steel for that job.
Boatbuilding will soon be the last font of hand saw use by professionals, if it isn't already. To remove frozen sex bolts, which can be difficult, I drill into bolthead side so I can hammer in a square Easyout that can be held in a vise to either unscrew or drill out the nut.
If you want a best-quality western saw, you buy one made prior to 1928 when the polishing was at its best. I'm at the point of my life where I no longer have to compromise on hand tools, given the availability of on-line auctions.
Right now I'm buying sleeper Disston #16's, some still with full-width blades, for $6-15 and thumbhole D-8 rip saws (where a longer, thicker blade is often better in wet wood) for around the same price. I do have to send them back to Japan, every few years, for sharpening so I have a double set. The Japanese saw makers seem to use a hammer that leaves a tiny set punch like mark on the steel when tensioning. The only major disadvantage of the best Japanese saws is that few users can sharpen them as well as they were originally by the maker. Western saws are the exact opposite, and a good filer can change the crown of the cutting edge, make the teeth taller and the gullets deeper to clear damp sawdust better, and even change the fleam or cutting edge bevel at the heel to make the saw start easier.
Filing with a 60-degree triangular file used at a 22 to 45-degree slope from vertical instead of straight across like the filing machines do produces taller teeth with longer cutting edges along with deeper gullets to better clear sawdust. The best Western and Japanese handsaws are quite thin yet in competent hands won’t kink in a cut, and the spring steel they are made from is tempered to allow sharpening with files. This just a small trial balloon to see if I can satisfactorily explain something significantly more complicated than tuning a block plane.
The first 10 years of issues still sit in a complete but dogeared  set about 10 feet from me. So, how about it FWW?  A "best of knots" database containing article-quality posts that for one reason or another do not make it into the printed publication? Part IILump and Cup RemovalOn saws that have been kinked repeatedly or severely, it’s common to achieve a straight cutting edge by hammering and tensioning as I described in the previous installment, but still not have a saw that will cut smoothly. Even after I used a good portion of the wood from the bed for the assembly table, I still have a lot left so I thought it would be a good project to use a lot of the smaller pieces I have.


After a couple of dry fits to make sure everything fit together properly it was time for the glue up. Fitting the top actually occurred after this even though there is already one picture of it a little bit ago.
This was actually perfect because it gave just enough room for each saw without overcrowding.
To get WoodenBoat delivered to your door or computer, mobile device of choice, etc, click WB Subscriptions. That is, when I turn with a screwdriver from the other side the whole thing is spinning in the wood. I seem to be the only tradesman on any site these days who keeps a sharpened and set handsaw in a wooden scabbard. Even the part to know that you have to spring the blade both ways so that the buckle doesn't tend to reappear or move somewhere else or inherit a binding point when in use after hammering on it. But I did learn when I built my boat(mostly at night) that things can be built relatively fast with a good sharp one.
I never thought of phosphoric acid, and I have a gallon of it sitting around for rusty iron keels.
And now that I know how to take the kinks out (not me!), several are certainly worth the clean-up effort as well. They are usually taper ground in two dimensions, so the blade’s cutting edge is thicker than the back, and both the back and the cutting edge taper from the saw’s heel to the saw’s toe. This saw was habitually filed without jointing, and instead of straight or crown-breasted, the cutting edge resembles the hooked nose of the Wicked Witch of the West.
This Disston #16’s cutting edge was hammered straight, but you can see a small bend remaining in the saw’s back and what appears to be a cup or lump remaining that will bind in the kerf during sawing and cause the saw to wander.A short straightedge run down the blade allows chalking the lump’s outline on the concave side. Currently they just sit where ever they fit and that’s usually on top of the cutoff bin. The cutting of the kerf wasn’t wide enough to allow all saws to be seated at once so I used a thin file to widen things a bit until every saw fit without being forced in. Before you ask, yes a couple plates are a little bent but I wanted to try my hand at straightening them (at some point). It ended up being my primary tool when I didn't want to risk disturbing the neighbors with the power tools. I have a few golden oldies that appear to be as pitted and neglected as the sample you straightened Or worse). The thinner the cutting edge, the greater the taper, and the higher the polish, the higher the saw’s quality, as taper results in less set required for the teeth, aided by the steel’s polish that inhibits binding in the cut.
The section would have selected articles of interest and suitable for reference purposes for all woodworms.I wander if this idea has come up in the past? Turn the saw over and transfer the marks to the convex side of the lump.Any tension in the concavity is removed using a small, convex-faced hammer, hammering on the marks from the outside of the circle inwards.
I know they'll never be finest-kind shiny again as they are too pitted, but what can we do to restore some slickness and purtiness to the old war horse?
All these features allow for a narrower kerf requiring less sawing effort.There are two fundamental choices in manufacturing a thin saw that won’t kink.
The least expensive choice is to make the saw stiff by using hard steel and disposable blades, because such saws can’t be economically resharpened.


7 new teeth per inch on a 26” cutting edge require 182 strikes of the stamping dies, and a major retoothing usually bows the blade. Rub out the old chalk marks and use the straightedge to make new ones, then repeat the same marking and hammering sequence of using the light hammer on the concave side and the heavy hammer on the convex side. One where you stand the saw on their handle vertically and rest the blade in the kerf of another piece of wood.
I currently have 6 hand saws that need a home and since the wife told me I was cut off from getting anymore I space everything out evenly for only six and no more.
I've tried everything from steel wool to those abrasive impregnated rubber blocks, with WD-40, kero, rust remover stuff (naval jelly etc) etc. So as soon as the blade comes out of the carrier, I again bend it both ways and strike 182 blows on the convex  side just above the gullets with the light hammer. Stop when the straightedge makes full contact with the blade.Then tension the saw as I did in the first installment using the small hammer.
I had laid out my pieces and used my saws to get an idea of the overall size and shape but my pieces were looking like they might be too short for what I was wanting.
Steel from the area around the dimple is pulled inwards toward the point of impact, making the steel in the circular area radiating from the dimple stiffer, or “tensioned” on its surface. Strikes near the edges provide tension to the edges, strikes near the center flatten the saw. Hundreds of such hammer blows applied in certain patterns equally to both sides of a handsaw blade can make it stiffer, can true a warped circular sawblade, or can dish a large bandsaw blade to conform to its wheels while at the same time tensioning the cutting edge. Truing sawblades are not low-order skills, and the major saw factories and filing shacks of logging camps and commercial sawmills was where you found them. Here you either find an old, retired saw doctor who worked for a big mill, a Japanese saw maker still tensioning by hand, or are on your own because there are few references. Following this design the first thing I needed to do was get the angle that would best fit for the saw to hang.
This relieves any recent stress put in the saw, and sometimes makes the existing kink worse or reveals additional problems like bow or twist.The tools I’ll use to remove the kink are a steel anvil and two hammers, both heavy and light, both with slightly convex faces. I’ll mark the areas to be struck with chalk and using and oily rag, keep all steel surfaces clean and oiled to prevent marking the blade.Removing a kink or bow requires stretching the steel surface on the concave side of the kink, and compressing the surface on the convex side. To test it out I laid a ruler until it made contact along the handle of the saw and lined it up with the 35° line I made on the panel. Before doing either, the saw’s tension at the cutting edge needs to removed or my attempt may make the kink worse. I accomplish this on the concave side by striking along a line running an inch or slightly less upwards from the tooth gullets. Now that I had my angle set it was just a matter of figuring how I would put it all together.
I made identical chalk marks on the opposite side of the saw, but I don’t attempt to strike them yet.On the identical marks on the convex side of the kink, I’ll accomplish two tasks simultaneously using light hits with the heavy hammer. The heavier hammer strikes will both remove the tension from this side of the saw and straighten out the kink by reversing the conditions that caused it, compressing the near side and stretching the far side of the blade.I sight down the cutting edge to insure I removed the kink and repeat the previous steps if necessary.




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Comments to «Straightening bent hand saw blades 550mm»

  1. Olmez_Sevgimiz writes:
    Say It is a..??which the students then repeat about Miter Saws Overall performance Power how.
  2. GAMER writes:
    Light and medium vehicles using leverage and torque will in no way use straightening bent hand saw blades 550mm on my bikes, but I could.


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