Kashf-ul-Asrar Book of Sultan-ul-Faqr, Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in Urdu by Hafiz Hammad ur Rehman Sarwari Qadri by the permision and supervision of by Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus. Ganj ul Asrar is written by Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh and translated by Hafiz Hammad ur Rehman, under the supervision of Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus, the 31st Shaikh of Sarwari Qadri Order.
Kalam Mashaikh Sarwari Qadri Book is written by 31st Shaikh of Sarwari Qadri order Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus. Shams-ul-Arifeen Book of Sultan-ul-Faqr, Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in Urdu by Hafiz Hammad ur Rehman Sarwari Qadri by the permision and supervision of Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus.
Kashf-ul-Asrar by Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in English by Mrs. Abyat-e-Bahoo Kamil Book is written by 31st Shaikh of Sarwari Qadri order Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus.
Risala Roohi Sharif by Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in English by Mrs. The Spiritual Guides of Sarwari Qadri Order is written by Sultan-ul-Ashiqeen Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus, the 31st Shaikh of Sarwari Qadri Order. Ganj-ul-Asrar English by Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in English by Mrs.
Sultan Bahoo Complete Life History in English Written by Sultan-ul-Ashiqeen Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus and Translated by Ambreen Moghees Sarwari Qadri M.A.
Sultan Bahoo Complete Life History in Urdu Written by Sultan-ul-Ashiqeen Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus. Shams-ul-Arifeen Book of Sultan-ul-Faqr, Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in English by Ambreen Moghees Sarwari Qadri M.A. Sultan-ul-Waham Book of Sultan-ul-Faqr, Sultan-ul-Arifeen Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Bahoo Rehmat-ul-Allah Alayh Translated in English by Ambreen Moghees Sarwari Qadri M.A.
In the recent times, printed Urdu literature and Urdu language itself have been popularly associated with Muslims and Islam in India, often assumed to be reflecting religious orthodoxy and austere iconoclasm due to a supposed absence of images or least the images of human figure in its contemporary printed examples.


But 1950s onwards, there was a decline in Urdu’s print culture, primarily as Urdu was removed not only from being a medium of education but even a subject in most schools in north India, mainly in Uttar Pradesh which was ironically its birth place and natural home.
While some of this archival literature may be preserved in libraries, museums or private collections, the general public is not aware of its richness and continues to perceive Urdu language as an orthodox symbol of Muslim identity.
This web portal will serve as an open-ended digital archive of the material collected during this project.
The ignorance about Urdu’s secular and celebratory past is so acute that in a recent example, couplets of 19th century Urdu poet Mirza Ghalib were attributed by Mumbai police as inciting hatred and terror.
Urdu language or script was the most common medium of mainstream communication, especially at the time when print culture began thriving in north India.
In short, an entire new generation was schooled without an essential language and script that their immediate ancestors were familiar with. The archive will not only host the stand-alone images, but also much more textual information or metadata about each item, which can even be edited by other scholars.
Mass Communication) by the permision and supervision of Khadim Sultan-ul-Faqr Hazrat Sakhi Sultan Mohammad Najib-ur-Rehman Madzillah-ul-Aqdus.
But this one-sided stereotype of Urdu may not necessarily be a construction of the non-Urdu people alone. While today’s Urdu printed literature such as books, magazines or other ephemera may reflect a lack of liberal visuals or artistic creativity (mainly due to a sharp decline in its readership), Urdu printed ephemera in early 20th century was the main carrier of ideas, news, business and education, with a large pan-India readership that was not restricted to Muslims alone.
Naturally then, the first thing to be affected was Urdu’s connection with mainstream media, industry, politics and professional lives of people. Private or public collections of such printed ephemera comprises of a wide variety of art forms and visuals. Since this database will have the facility of new material and images being added in future (even by select visitors), it can be used to add images and material related to our theme on a continuous basis.
Its popularity can be gauged by the fact that Urdu magazines carried advertisements of almost all mainstream trade brands just as today’s major newspapers or magazines do.


Slowly, as the Urdu-literate generation dwindled, so did the liberal and inclusive image of the language and its printed literature. Thus, it will act as a valuable archive for the students of Urdu language, literature as well as art history and sociologists. Most importantly, the advertisements and the illustrated features in popular Urdu periodicals were not restricted in any way about the depiction of culture, arts, cinema, glamour, and women etc. And today, much of Urdu works published in India are restricted to religious themes or the issues of Muslim community. For instance, old (pre-modern era) manuscripts of Persian or Arabic books or Mughal miniature paintings may not find a place in this project. They also catered to the religious or cultural needs of Hindus and other communities as much as they did to the Muslims. A large number of Urdu-literate people, especially in qasbas or small towns in the north, continued to preserve the vibrant literature of the past in their personal collections.
Thus, the research question for the project could be: If Urdu print culture of early 20th century India was not restricted exclusively to Islamic or Islamicate themes and was a more inclusive media for mainstream secular communication, what caused it to be slowly associated with Indian Muslims alone? Similarly, Urdu was one of the first Indian languages in which progressive ephemera such as greeting cards, calendars and business stationary etc. And even a cursory look at its liberal images breaks many stereotypes not only about a language but also the Muslim community itself.



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