The power of introverts free pdf,positive thinking for healthy life kitchen,how to invest in shares market in india,how to activate your right brain - .

Author: admin, 09.06.2014. Category: The Power Of Attraction

The book made the cover of Time magazine, spent weeks on the New York Times best-sellers list and was the subject of one of the most-watched TED Talks, with more than 13 million views.
From that grew The Quiet Revolution, a company Cain co-founded that continues to produce and share content about, and for, introverts. The site offers an online training course for parents and stories submitted by readers about being introverted. Kids, Cain says, "are at the heart and center of it." "Introverts often are really amazing, talented, gifted, loving children, and they feel like there's something wrong with them," she says. I talked with Cain about her mission of supporting introverts, and asked her advice on how to teach them.
It's a person who feels at their best and at their most alive when they're in quieter, more mellow environments. Introverts have nervous systems that simply react more to everything that's going on around them, and that means they feel more in their sweet spot when there's less stuff happening.
And extroverts have nervous systems that react less, which means that they don't get to their sweet spot until there's more stuff happening. An introverted kid would rather draw quietly or would rather play their favorite sport with one or two other kids. A more extroverted child would rather be part of a big gang and a big noisy birthday party, and not only not be fazed by it but seem to really relish all that stimulation. It's a kind of self-consciousness and not wanting people to look at you and feeling easily embarrassed or easily shamed.


And in practice, many introverted children are also shy, but many are not, and you can also have children that are quite extroverted but who are shy, and as soon as they overcome their shyness, you see them being in the middle of the big gang. So it's really important when you're working with children to understand what is actually happening inside them so that you make sure that you're responding to the right thing.
You know, lots of schools are really hungry for information on how they can do a better job of working with these kids. They're asking good questions: What indeed are the right ways to think about class participation? Like we [at Quiet Revolution] have been encouraging schools to think in terms of classroom engagement rather than participation. Take a more holistic way of looking at how a child is engaging with this material or with their classmates. One of the anecdotes I loved in the book was when the teacher had her students think for a minute before answering. This is a technique where the teacher asks the students a question; asks them to think about the answer. And then, once they're paired, once they've articulated it with that partner, then you ask each pair to share their thoughts with the room as a whole. But in front of only one other student, they don't have to do it in front of the whole class.
And then, often, once they have had that warmup period with one other student, they're then much more likely to want to share with the whole class.


It's great for the extroverts, too, but it just happens to work well with the more reticent kids. Well, of course social media is such a big thing, so for introverts, there are pros and cons. But my first impulse is to say helpful, and there are teachers now who are starting to incorporate social media into their classrooms and report that the more reticent children are much more likely to participate when their means of expression is through their screens. They can type their answer into a screen, the other students then see what they have written or typed or whatever, and then "real life" dialogue begins based on the initial ideas that were contributed through the screen. The key, if we're talking about public speaking or really anything that kids are fearful of, is to think of anxiety levels on a scale of 1 to 10, and to make sure you're pushing kids within a zone of 4 to 6. If you have a kid who is really freaking out, they're really in that 7-to-10 zone, it's just too dangerous to push them at that point. But there's too big a risk of it backfiring and the experience going poorly and the fear being further codified in their brain. Why don't you prepare your speech and work on it first with your best friend?" Give the speech to your friend.



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