To learn more about Type I diabetes, and Type II diabetes, visit our Health articles and Pharmacy news section today! The Accu-Chek Academy contains information specifically for healthcare professionals that have a keen interest in diabetes management. Join now to receive information on diabetes related news, tools to enable structured self-monitoring of blood glucose, exclusive offers, and more! This section is for under 18's and contains a great interactive tool to help you and your family learn more about diabetes.
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The Accu-Chek Structured Self-Monitoring blood glucose Diary is designed to help people with diabetes and health care professionals focus on achieving quality results in their diabetes management1.The Accu-Chek blood glucose diary guides you to record your blood glucose in a structured manner helping you understand and manage your diabetes.
Watch the video series for more information on how structured self-monitoring can help guide you and your healthcare team to adjust the many parts of your therapy. Your blood glucose changes throughout the day depending on different factors, such as eating, exercise, medication or illness. The diary has fields so you can record your blood glucose, insulin units, meal size and activity awareness. By recording something like a meal size, it may assist you in understanding what caused a sudden rise or drop in your blood glucose levels. Step 5: Circle the number you think is right for the amount of physical activity you had been doing. Step 6: Finally, in the comments column you can record any dietary changes, illness, type of hypos and note any significant changes to your body, your routine or the way you feel.
In the second section of the Accu-Chek blood glucose diary, you have the opportunity to complete the Accu-Chek 360 View 3-day profile. Testing before you eat will tell you about the effect your medication has on your blood glucose, while testing 2 hours after you eat tells you about the effect of your meal. To complete the Accu-Chek 360 View 3 day profile tool, it is very similar to the front section in the diary. Step 8: Graph your blood glucose level (from Step 3) by placing an X in the corresponding row of the chart. By self-monitoring your blood glucose you can measure how your body handles different types of food, exercise, medication, stress and illness. Watch the video series to see how the results of self-monitoring can help guide you and your healthcare team to adjust the many parts of your therapy.
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Pre-Diabetes, also known as Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (ITG), occurs when a person has elevated blood sugar levels that are just below the levels of a Diabetic.
This test uses a drop of blood and a meter that measures the level of glucose in your blood at the time you do the test.
You and your health care team need to use both the A1C and SMBG tests to get a complete picture of your blood glucose control.
Here is a chart from the American Diabetes Association to show you how your blood glucose testing results are likely to match up with your A1C results. Pre-Diabetes is a condition that occurs most commonly in people who have a genetic or lifestyle predisposition to developing Diabetes. Click here to take our Discovering Diabetes quiz to determine if you could be a candidate for Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetics often have similar digestive complications (see below) to Type 2 Diabetics but their blood sugar levels are lower than those of a full-blown Diabetic. Pre-Diabetics can often avoid getting Diabetes if they loose about 5 to 7 percent of their body fat.
Pre-Diabetics do have a greater risk of developing heart disease and other effects of Diabetes. We intend to do this within local communities, with partnerships and just through word of mouth. A1c chart, Another difference between different diabetes testing strips is that completely different strips need different amounts of blood to browse your blood glucose levels.. A1c and high post-meal blood sugars … – blood sugar 101, A1c and post-meal blood sugars predict heart attack please scroll down to read text.
A1c chart & calculator using the dcct formula, A1c chart has a1c to bs conversion using dcct formula.
Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 45 percent of new cases.
People with kidney failure undergo either dialysis, which substitutes for some of the filtering functions of the kidneys, or transplantation to receive a healthy donor kidney. About 5 to 10 percent of people with diagnosed diabetes have type 1 diabetes, which tends to first occur in young adults and children.


About 90 to 95 percent of people with diagnosed diabetes have type 2 diabetes, once known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or adult-onset diabetes.
Over several years, people who are developing kidney disease will have small amounts of the blood protein albumin begin to leak into their urine. Overall, kidney damage rarely occurs in the first 10 years of diabetes, and usually 15 to 25 years will pass before kidney failure occurs. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major factor in the development of kidney problems in people with diabetes. In the past, hypertension was defined as blood pressure exceeding 140 millimeters of mercury-systolic and 90 millimeters of mercury-diastolic. Hypertension can be seen not only as a cause of kidney disease, but also as a result of damage created by the disease. Scientists have made great progress in developing methods that slow the onset and progression of kidney disease in people with diabetes.
An example of an effective ACE inhibitor is captopril, which doctors commonly prescribe for treating kidney disease of diabetes. An example of an effective ARB is losartan, which has also been shown to protect kidney function and lower the risk of cardiovascular events. Antihypertensive drugs and low-protein diets can slow kidney disease when significant nephropathy is present. Intensive management is a treatment regimen that aims to keep blood glucose levels close to normal. When people with diabetes experience kidney failure, they must undergo either dialysis or a kidney transplant.
Currently, the survival of kidneys transplanted into patients with diabetes is about the same as survival of transplants in people without diabetes.
Work with your doctor regarding insulin injections, medicines, meal planning, physical activity, and blood glucose monitoring. The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Established in 1987, the Clearinghouse provides information about diseases of the kidneys and urologic system to people with kidney and urologic disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. Kidney & Urology Foundation of America (KUFA) is a national, 501 c(3) not-for-profit organization. Identify your HbA1c test score, mean blood and glucose level to know if your blood glucose is in the optimum level. By monitoring in a structured manner, you can gain a clearer picture of how your blood glucose changes in response to those factors. While using the Accu-Chek 360° View profiling tool you should test before and after breakfast, before and after lunch, before and after dinner, and once before you go to bed. Your blood glucose result may prompt you to eat a snack, take more insulin or go for a walk. Regularly testing your blood glucose helps measure the effectiveness of your meal plan, physical activity and medications. Please be aware that we do not take any responsibility for accessing such information which may not comply with any valid legal process, regulation, registration or usage in the country of your origin.
As the chart shows, the higher your self-testing numbers are over a 3-month period, the higher your A1C result is going to be. Therefore, they may be insulin resistant, obese and have other symptoms, but they have not quite developed full-blown Type 2 Diabetes. Studies indicate that if a Pre-Diabetic does not lose weight, he or she will get full-blown Diabetes within 10 years of the Pre-Diabetes onset.
Therefore, many Diabetes care professionals recommend that Pre-Diabetics take medication, and treat Pre-Diabetes in the same manner that a Diabetic would treat Diabetes. We intend for these key elements of sustainable lifestyle change to become pervasive within communities, and within the lives of all of us affected by the disease. In some people, the filtering function of the kidneys is actually higher than normal in the first few years of their diabetes.
For people who live with diabetes for more than 25 years without any signs of kidney failure, the risk of ever developing it decreases. Both a family history of hypertension and the presence of hypertension appear to increase chances of developing kidney disease.
As kidney disease proceeds, physical changes in the kidneys lead to increased blood pressure. Drugs used to lower blood pressure (antihypertensive drugs) can slow the progression of kidney disease significantly.
Patients with even mild hypertension or persistent microalbuminuria should consult a physician about the use of antihypertensive medicines. A third treatment, known as intensive management of blood glucose or glycemic control, has shown great promise for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, especially for those in early stages of nephropathy.


The regimen includes testing blood glucose frequently, administering insulin frequently throughout the day on the basis of food intake and physical activity, following a diet and activity plan, and consulting a health care team frequently.
In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), researchers found a 50 percent decrease in both development and progression of early diabetic kidney disease in participants who followed an intensive regimen for controlling blood glucose levels.
As recently as the 1970s, medical experts commonly excluded people with diabetes from dialysis and transplantation, in part because the experts felt damage caused by diabetes would offset benefits of the treatments. The test provides a weighted average of your blood glucose level for the previous 3 months. If blood pressure is high, follow your doctor’s plan for keeping it near normal levels. The doctor should provide you with an estimate of your kidney’s filtration based on the blood creatinine level.
Some experts predict that diabetes soon might account for half the cases of kidney failure. The NKUDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about kidney and urologic diseases.
The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired. Monitoring before you eat (pre-meal) and 2 hours after your first bite (post-meal) can help you understand how what you eat affects your blood glucose.
Self-monitoring can also alert you to a blood glucose level that is too high or too low, which requires special treatment. The good news is that Pre-Diabetes is NOT Type 2 Diabetes and can generally be treated without medication. Therefore, if you or someone you care about has Pre-Diabetes, it is important to educate yourself about methods of losing weight and becoming healthier so that you can avoid getting Type 2 Diabetes. Click each of the following to learn more about Carbohydrates, How Digestion Works and Diabetes interactively. Most people with diabetes do not develop nephropathy that is severe enough to cause kidney failure.
Nor can they explain fully the interplay of factors leading to diabetic nephropathy—factors including heredity, diet, and other medical conditions, such as high blood pressure. The human body normally converts food to glucose, the simple sugar that is the main source of energy for the body’s cells.
As the amount of albumin in the urine increases, filtering function usually begins to drop.
Therefore, a dangerous spiral, involving rising blood pressure and factors that raise blood pressure, occurs. Two types of drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), have proven effective in slowing the progression of kidney disease.
ACE inhibitors have lowered proteinuria and slowed deterioration even in diabetic patients who did not have high blood pressure. The intensively managed patients had average blood glucose levels of 150 milligrams per deciliter—about 80 milligrams per deciliter lower than the levels observed in the conventionally managed patients. Today, because of better control of diabetes and improved rates of survival following treatment, doctors do not hesitate to offer dialysis and kidney transplantation to people with diabetes.
In light of the increasing morbidity and mortality related to diabetes and kidney failure, patients, researchers, and health care professionals will continue to benefit by addressing the relationship between the two diseases. This test used to be called hemoglobin A-1-C (pronounced HE-mo-glow-bin A-one-C) or H-b-A-1-C. About 18 million people in the United States have diabetes, and more than 150,000 people are living with kidney failure as a result of diabetes.
They have found that high blood pressure and high levels of blood glucose increase the risk that a person with diabetes will progress to kidney failure. Early detection and treatment of even mild hypertension are essential for people with diabetes. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study, conducted from 1976 to 1997, showed conclusively that, in people with improved blood glucose control, the risk of early kidney disease was reduced by a third. Creatinine is one such waste, and a blood test for creatinine can be used to estimate the decline in kidney filtration.
Additional studies conducted over the past decades have clearly established that any program resulting in sustained lowering of blood glucose levels will be beneficial to patients in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy. Beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and other blood pressure drugs may also be needed. Twenty to 40 percent of people with type 1 diabetes develop kidney failure by the age of 50.



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Comments

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