THE MEDICAL PROFESSION WOULD have you believe that diabetes is not reversible and only controlling your blood sugar with drugs or insulin will protect you from organ damage and death. The diabetes epidemic is accelerating along with the obesity epidemic, and what you are not hearing about is another way to treat it.
Type 2 diabetes, or what was once called adult onset diabetes, is increasing worldwide and now affects nearly 100 million people — and over 20 million Americans. We are seeing increasing rates of Type 2 diabetes, especially in children, which has increased over 1,000 percent in the last decade and was unknown before this generation. In a report in The New England Journal of Medicine, Walter Willett, MD, PhD, and his colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health demonstrated that 91 percent of all Type 2 diabetes cases could be prevented through improvements lifestyle and diet. Here, I want to review in detail this new way of thinking about diabetes and outline the tests I recommend to identify problems with blood sugar. When your diet is full of empty calories, an abundance of quickly absorbed sugars and carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, etc.), the body slowly becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and needs more to do the same job of keeping your blood sugar even. Insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome associated with it is often accompanied by increasing central obesity, fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, problems with blood clotting, as well as increased inflammation.
These clues can often be picked up decades before anyone ever gets diabetes — and may help you prevent diabetes entirely. If you have a family history of obesity (especially around the belly), diabetes, early heart disease, or even dementia you are even more prone to this problem.
Most people know about the common complications of diabetes such as heart attacks, strokes, amputations, blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage. Diabetes and pre-diabetes ARE reversible by aggressively changing lifestyle, nutritional support, and occasionally medications. In fact many people with pre-diabetes never get diabetes, but they are at severe risk just the same. We were highly adapted to a nutrient-dense, low-sugar, high-fiber diet rich in omega-3 fats. Now, in just one generation, they are nearly all obese and 80 percent have diabetes by the time they are 30 years old! New science shows that it’s possible, through an aggressive approach of lifestyle, nutritional support, and occasionally medications. It is important to diagnose Type 2 diabetes early, but it is often not diagnosed until very late. In fact, all doctors should aggressively diagnose pre-diabetes decades before diabetes occurs, and before any damage is done to your body. Unfortunately, there is a continuum of risk from slightly abnormal insulin and blood sugar to full blown diabetes.
In a recent study, anyone with a fasting blood sugar of over 87 was at increased risk of diabetes. Most doctors are not concerned until the blood sugar is over 110 — or worse, over 126, which is diabetes.
Insulin Glucose Challenge Test – This should be done with a 2-hour glucose challenge, 75 grams measuring fasting, 1- and 2-hour blood sugar AND insulin. Hemoglobin A1C Test – This is an important measure of glycated hemoglobin, which can be an early indicator of sugar problems.
NMR Lipid Profile – This test is slightly different from the one above as it identifies the size of your cholesterol particles. High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Test – This is a measure of inflammation, one of the classic conditions that is both the cause and result of insulin resistance and diabetes.
Fibrinogen Test – This measures your risk of clotting, which can cause heart attacks and strokes. Please leave your thoughts by adding a comment below – but remember, we can’t offer personal medical advice online, so be sure to limit your comments to those about taking back our health! Mark Hyman MD is the Medical Director at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, the Founder of The UltraWellness Center, and a ten-time #1 New York Times Bestselling author.
Blood sugar, or glucose, is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to your body's organs, muscles and nervous system. Normal blood sugar varies from person to person, but a normal range for fasting blood sugar (the amount of glucose in your blood six to eight hours after a meal) is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter.
These variations in blood-sugar levels, both before and after meals, are normal and reflect the way that glucose is absorbed and stored in the body. As the small intestine absorbs glucose, the pancreas releases insulin, which stimulates body tissues and causes them to absorb this glucose and metabolize it (a process known as glycogenesis). When glucose levels drop between meals, the body takes some much-needed sugar out of storage.
When there isn't enough glucose stored up to maintain normal blood-sugar levels, the body will even produce its own glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (such as amino acids and glycerol). Too much glucose over an extended time (hyperglycemia) can result in the destruction of nerves, lowered resistance to infection, and heart and kidney disease. Diabetes is a type of lifestyle-related disease that affects many people worldwide with approximately 90% of patients being diagnosed with diabetes type 2. For those who are taking oral hypoglycaemic drugs, as well as those with type 1 diabetes (a condition where your body’s pancreas does not produce any insulin), one is strongly recommended to monitor their blood glucose levels frequently. Monitoring blood glucose levels can help you better understand how your daily activities, medication, food, insulin, mood swing and stress influence your blood sugar levels. Since most blood glucose monitors come with a memory to store the readings in which this data can be downloaded to a computer and hence helping a doctor to monitor and analyze so that a better treatment of diabetes can be recommended for the patient.
To maintain the accuracy of the reading of a blood glucose meter, it should be recalibrated each time the reading is taken the device should be properly maintained. You should always ask your doctor’s advice regarding correct instructions in using a glucose meter.
After getting the reading from your blood glucose meter, make sure you write it down in a record book everyday so that you can better keep track of your diabetes condition.
Another important point for you is that you should keep your blood glucose level as close as possible to its normal range so as to help reduce the risk of long-term complications arising from diabetes. Note: If you are unable to perform this blood glucose testing, you can still perform urine test by using urine test strips to check the condition of your glucose levels. Join tens of thousands of doctors, health professionals and patients who receive our newsletters.


New research suggests that people who arrive at the hospital emergency department with acute heart failure should have blood sugar levels tested on arrival to identify those at a high risk of early death, further hospitalizations or the development of health issues, such as diabetes. Testing blood sugar levels of acute heart failure patients may be a simple and cost-effective way to determine patients at high risk of early death, further hospitalizations or the development of diabetes. Acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) account for a substantial number of emergency department (ED) visits annually and are associated with high short- and long-term mortality rates. The purpose of a large study published online in the European Heart Journal was to evaluate the prognostic implications of blood glucose on a wide range of outcomes including early mortality, hospitalizations and incident diabetes in AHFS - an avenue of investigation the researchers considered to have not previously been fully elucidated.
Researchers from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre at the University Health Network, and the University of Toronto, Canada, analyzed a population-based cohort of 16,524 AHFS patients presenting to the ED in Ontario, Canada between 2004-2007.
The patients were aged 70-85 years, 8,115 (49%) were men and 9,275 (56%) did not have pre-existing diabetes. They also had a 39% increased risk of being hospitalized for diabetes-related reasons, such as hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), skin and soft tissue infections and amputations. The researchers indicate that further measures could include greater attention to finding the best medical therapy and drug doses, in those with heart failure and adverse blood glucose profiles. Prior work by the team suggests that hospitalizations for heart failure and cardiovascular causes are often increased amongst those with coronary heart disease. Ruling out significant coronary heart disease may also be important in those who also have diabetes and heart failure. Medical News Today recently reported that three new studies reveal that a chemical called nitrate - found in green vegetables including spinach, lettuce and celery - may aid heart health and reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:MLANichols, Hannah.
For any corrections of factual information, or to contact our editorial team, please see our contact page.
Please note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Find out about the most effective ways in which to find and check a pulse, whether it's your own or someone else's.
An introduction to heart rate, a measurement of how many times a person's heart beats per minute. But medication and insulin can actually increase your risk of getting a heart attack or dying. Insulin resistance, when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, is primarily what causes diabetes.
The high insulin leads to an appetite that is out of control, and increasing weight gain around the belly. Some may even know that it increases your risk of dementia and cancers and can cause impotence. Therefore, I recommend early testing with anyone who has a family history of Type 2 diabetes, central abdominal weight gain or abnormal cholesterol. Your blood sugar should be less than 80 fasting and never rise above 110 or 120 after one to two hours.
It measures sugars and proteins combining into glycated proteins called AGEs (advanced glycation end products), like the crust on bread, or the crispy top on creme brule. An HDL or good cholesterol level under 60 and triglycerides over 100 should make you suspicious of insulin resistance.
With insulin resistance or Type 2 diabetes, you develop small LDL and HDL cholesterol particles. I have seen this hundreds of times in my patients and there is no reason you can’t achieve the same thing if you apply these principles. The body gets glucose from the food you eat, and the absorption, storage and production of glucose is regulated constantly by complex processes involving the small intestine, liver and pancreas.
After you eat, your body breaks down the carbohydrates in food into smaller parts, including glucose, which can be absorbed by the small intestine.
This stored glucose (glycogen) is used to maintain healthy blood-sugar levels between meals. The process is kicked off by the pancreas, which releases a hormone known as glucagon, which promotes the conversion of stored sugar (glycogen) in the liver back to glucose.
This process, known as gluconeogenesis, occurs most often during intense exercise and instances of starvation. Frequent checking and monitoring of your glucose blood level can help you stay healthy while reducing the risk of long-term complications arising from diabetes. These factors include overall health, age, and whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Similarly, people with type 2 diabetes (a condition when your body’s cells ignore the insulin or your pancreas does not produce enough insulin) are also advised to monitor their glucose level so that the given treatment can meet the desired goals. This info is much needed as it will aid in better management of your diabetes besides delaying or preventing diabetic complications which include kidney failure, blindness and diabetic indulged eye disease. From the blood glucose monitor, you get a reading of your blood glucose level in a digital form. Most manufacturers provide good service support but some do not, so you should look for the meter which offers the best service and technical support. It is always easier to prick on your fingertip as it is less painful to prick particularly on one side.
Talk to your doctor if your blood glucose level is not within the normal range and ask him or her to suggest a good range for your blood glucose level and also what you should do to maintain a healthy blood glucose level. Learn about the how to measure your pulse, what a normal resting heart rate is and how exercise affects it. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. Your insulin should be less than 5 fasting and should never rise above 30 after one to two hours. These create inflammation and oxidative stress throughout the body, and promote heart disease and dementia and accelerating aging. They are much more dangerous than larger particles and lead to increased risk of atherosclerosis or heart disease.
In fact, anyone with a high C-reactive protein has a 1,700 percent increased risk of getting diabetes.


This is entirely due to sugar and carbohydrates in our diet that cause fatty liver, liver damage, and even cirrhosis. Monitoring diabetes or blood glucose level is important to help monitor how much glucose present in your blood.
Personal preferences and your understanding regarding your health condition can help you better target your blood glucose level. Many blood glucose monitors come with different features with some of them made specifically for those who have poor eyesight or other disabilities.
It is always advisable to ask your doctor which area (such as thigh, or forearm) should be used with your meter. Certainly, in most cases, ‘acceptable’ blood glucose levels can be slightly varied from one individual to another.
You may also need to advise your doctor about what you have eaten, how active you are during the day, and how medications affect your insulin when discussing your glucose level with them, so that they can help you manage your diabetes or blood glucose level.
Our results suggest that all such patients should undergo further testing for diabetes before discharge. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. I recommend this test for everyone over 50, and for anyone with any risk of insulin resistance, even children. Elizabeth has traveled throughout the Americas, studying political systems and indigenous cultures and teaching English to students of all ages. Therefore, it is particularly important for you to discuss with your doctor which one suits you best. To avoid life-threatening complications, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin for their entire lives. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. Ketones and KetoacidosisWithout treatment, type 1 diabetes deprives your cells of the sugar they need for energy. This plus other changes in your blood can trigger a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis.
Type 2 DiabetesIn type 1 diabetes, your immune system destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. The symptoms of the two forms are similar, but usually come on more quickly in people with type 1.
Scientists have found 50 genes or gene regions that make you more likely to get type 1 diabetes.
It affects boys and girls equally, but it's more common in whites than in other ethnic groups. According to the World Health Organization, type 1 diabetes is rare in most African, Native American, and Asian people.
How Is It Diagnosed?Your doctor will probably check your fasting blood sugar or he may do a random blood sugar test.
He could also get your A1c level, which shows average blood sugar readings for the past 2-3 months. Long-Term ProblemsHaving high blood sugar for a long time can damage many of your body's systems. You'll prick a finger, put a drop of blood onto a test strip, and slide the strip into a meter.
When your levels are near the normal range, you'll have more energy, fewer skin problems, and a lower risk of heart disease and kidney damage. Could a Continuous Glucose Monitor Help?This tool uses a sensor to measure the level of glucose in your body every 10 seconds.
Your doctor will explain how to adjust the amounts based on the results of your blood sugar tests.
How to Spot an Insulin ReactionThis happens when insulin lowers your blood sugar to dangerous levels. Tell a friend or family member how to spot the signs of a reaction and show them how to give you the shot. Is Your Treatment Working?Your doctor will probably suggest you have an A1c blood test every 3 to 6 months. If the results aren’t good, you may need to adjust your insulin dose, meal planning, or physical activity.
If Insulin Doesn't WorkIf insulin shots can’t control your blood sugar or you have frequent reactions, your doctor might suggest a pancreatic islet cell transplant.
In this experimental procedure, a surgeon transfers healthy insulin-making cells from a donor into your pancreas. Hope for an Artificial PancreasResearchers are working on a system called the artificial pancreas. This combination of an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor is controlled by a complex computer program. That means it will adjust the insulin it puts out in response to rising or falling blood sugar levels. Early trials suggest it can improve blood sugar control.  Exercise With CautionYou need to get some physical activity, but be careful when you do it. The key is to work with your health care team to balance your insulin shots, meals, and physical activity. If your diabetes isn’t well controlled, it can cause complications, including birth defects. Good control of blood sugar before you get pregnant lowers your odds for these problems and for miscarriage. Parents must help children check blood sugar, plan meals, and adjust insulin doses around the clock.
The disease requires 24-hour maintenance, so you also have to make plans for treatment during school and activities afterward.



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Comments

  1. 12.07.2016 at 18:17:37


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  2. 12.07.2016 at 14:26:48


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    Author: PREZIDENT
  3. 12.07.2016 at 20:41:39


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  4. 12.07.2016 at 18:42:21


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