Informed consent must be obtained from participants in this experiment (parental consent must be granted for minors). Follow all safety precautions when using the blood glucose monitoring kit and when handling blood, as described in the Procedure. You are probably very familiar with the fact that over time, exercise changes your muscles, your lungs, your bones, and even your mindset; but did you know it has an immediate effect on your body's biochemistry? Investigate how blood glucose (sugar) levels change with exercise, and how to stabilize those levels during and after exercise. Fortunately, for most of us, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are unlikely to occur because our bodies carefully regulate our blood glucose levels.
This video shows how blood glucose levels change over time for people with and without diabetes (Khan Academy, 2011). Of course, in order to regulate glucose, our bodies need to have some to work with in the first place. Although blood glucose levels stay in a safe range for most people, they do fluctuate over the course of a day based on when, how much, and what you eat. Exercise also either increases or decreases blood glucose levels, depending on the person and other factors (the effects of exercise will be further explained in the next paragraph). This video shows how glucose is normally taken up from the blood by cells, and how problems with this process occur in diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring system and additional test strips and lancets, which are small surgical blades used to obtain a drop of blood. We also do our best to make sure that any listed supplier provides prompt, courteous service. Proceeds from the affiliate programs help support Science Buddies, a 501(c)(3) public charity. Before participating, discuss the science project (and any exercise routine required) with his or her doctor. Limit exercise to 1–2 sessions a day (to avoid hypoglycemia) unless the person regularly and safely exercises more frequently than this and takes proper safety precautions. Not exercise within 2 hours of going to sleep (to avoid changes in blood glucose levels while the person is asleep). Before testing how exercise affects a volunteer's blood glucose levels, establish a baseline of blood glucose levels for that person. Become familiar with the blood glucose monitoring system and how to use it to check a person's blood glucose levels. In your lab notebook, make a data table to record your volunteer's baseline blood glucose measurements. Right before the volunteer eats either breakfast or lunch, use the blood glucose monitoring system to measure his or her blood glucose levels.
Touch the test strip down onto the drop of blood, allowing the blood to be drawn into the strip. Once you are done taking the measurement, properly dispose of the test strip and have the volunteer wash his or her hands. Two hours after the volunteer started eating the meal, check his or her blood glucose levels again, as you did in step 3, above. Repeat steps 3–4 for the next two days so that you have taken these measurements for three days in a row. If possible, try to also have the volunteer keep his or her diet relatively consistent over the three-day period, before and while you take measurements.
How did the person's blood glucose levels change from before eating a meal to after eating a meal? You will now measure the volunteer's blood glucose levels before, during, and after exercising for 20 minutes.
Note: A person with diabetes should limit exercise to 1 to 2 sessions a day (to avoid hypoglycemia) (unless the person regularly and safely exercises more frequently than this and takes proper safety precautions). Choose which exercise activity (or combination of activities) you want your volunteer to do. Figure out when to have the volunteer do the exercise activity (either right before they eat breakfast or lunch, or 2 hours after he or she has started eating the meal). If the volunteer does not have diabetes, and their blood glucose levels are not abnormal, it should be safe to have them exercise at either time.
If the volunteer has diabetes, it is recommended that exercise is done after eating a meal to prevent low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia).
In your lab notebook, make a data table to record your volunteer's blood glucose measurements. Right before the volunteer starts the exercise activity, use the blood glucose monitoring system to measure his or her blood glucose levels, as you did in step 3 of the previous section. After the volunteer has finished exercising (for 20 minutes), measure his or her blood glucose levels again, as you did in step 3 of the previous section. Safety Note: Checking blood glucose levels after exercising is important for a person with diabetes so he or she can prevent low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) hours later. Repeat steps 6–8 for the next two days so that you have taken these exercise-related measurements for three days in a row. If possible, before the measurements are taken each day, try to also have the volunteer keep his or her diet relatively consistent over the three-day period, and consistent to when you took the original blood glucose measurements.
Calculate the average glucose levels for before exercising, during exercising, and after exercising for the three days.
Look at your graph and the average glucose levels you calculated and try to interpret your data. Did the volunteer's blood glucose levels generally increase, decrease, or stay about the same when they exercised?
You will now investigate how the effects of exercise on blood glucose levels could be managed and lessened, keeping the blood glucose levels more stable. Look at your results from the previous section and figure out whether the blood glucose levels were relatively high or low at any point. For an idea of blood glucose level ranges, see step 6 in the "Creating a Baseline" section, above, and the resources in the Bibliography in the Background section. Make a plan for how to lessen the effects of exercise on the volunteer's blood glucose levels by changing only one of the following three factors: (1) eating food, (2) intensity of exercise, and (3) exercise time.
Eating food: If a person's blood glucose levels clearly drop during exercise, then eating a carbohydrate snack may help increase his or her blood glucose levels. Intensity of the exercise and time spent exercising: If a person's blood glucose levels clearly decrease or increase during exercise, then doing a less intense exercise or exercising for less time may help.
Safety note: If your volunteer has diabetes, they should talk to their doctor before doing a more intense, or longer, exercise activity. If you have more than one volunteer, make a plan for each volunteer based on their individual results. Once you have planned how the activity will be changed, repeat steps 4–9 of the "Investigating the Effects of Exercise" section, but this time use your modified activity. If you want, you can make a line graph of the averages from the modified activity and the original activity.
You should end up with six lines, with three from the averages of each type of activity tested. Look at your graphs and the average blood glucose levels you calculated and try to interpret your data.
Did the volunteer's blood glucose levels generally increase, decrease, or stay about the same when he or she exercised?
Does it look like your plan helped make the volunteer's blood glucose levels more stable when he or she exercised? Overall, were you able to help lessen the effects of exercise on blood glucose levels by changing the volunteer's exercise routine or having them eat? Eating food changes our blood glucose levels, and different types of foods may affect it differently.
How does eating a certain, defined amount of glucose affect a person's blood glucose levels immediately and over time?


Compared to a typical science class, please tell us how much you learned doing this project. My group had problems with making sure we recorded what we ate, our levels, and what time we took the reading.
The Ask an Expert Forum is intended to be a place where students can go to find answers to science questions that they have been unable to find using other resources.
Who does a diabetic turn to if they have questions or do not understand how to manage their disease?
Ever wondered who plans the school lunch, food for patients at a hospital, or the meals for athletes at the Olympics?
You may print and distribute up to 200 copies of this document annually, at no charge, for personal and classroom educational use.
Reproduction of material from this website without written permission is strictly prohibited. During the oral glucose tolerance test your blood glucose is tested two hours after drinking 75 grams of glucose. Blood sugar, or glucose, is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to your body's organs, muscles and nervous system. Normal blood sugar varies from person to person, but a normal range for fasting blood sugar (the amount of glucose in your blood six to eight hours after a meal) is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter.
These variations in blood-sugar levels, both before and after meals, are normal and reflect the way that glucose is absorbed and stored in the body. As the small intestine absorbs glucose, the pancreas releases insulin, which stimulates body tissues and causes them to absorb this glucose and metabolize it (a process known as glycogenesis). When glucose levels drop between meals, the body takes some much-needed sugar out of storage.
When there isn't enough glucose stored up to maintain normal blood-sugar levels, the body will even produce its own glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (such as amino acids and glycerol). Too much glucose over an extended time (hyperglycemia) can result in the destruction of nerves, lowered resistance to infection, and heart and kidney disease. A clinical trial at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and the University of Washington will address new approaches to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes or slow its progression.
The Restoring Insulin Secretion, or RISE, Study will examine the effects of three such medication regimens.  Each will be administered for 12 months.
Thestudyis a nationwide program looking at the effects of various treatments to preserve insulin secretion and thereby prevent the development of diabetes or its progression early in the disease. The study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, is currently recruiting patients. More details are available at the National Institute of Health’s clinical trials website, identifier: NCT01779362.
Valentine's Day is coming up and while searching for gift ideas for my husband on Pinterest, I came across some pins for a cute thing to do called, '14 Days to Valentine's,' or '14 Days of Love.' Basically, you'd give a small gift and a sweet (or cheesy) note to go with the gift, on all 14 days leading up to Valentine's Day. My plan is to give a small treat (like his favorite chocolate bar or can of beer) from days 1 - 7, then on days 8 - 14, I'll give some bigger gifts like a shirt, etc. Now this all sounds very sweet and romantic, but as I've discovered it does take a bit of planning to come up with 14 different gifts, figure out how to present the gifts, as well as think of a sweet message to go with each gift. If you need more ideas and inspiration, click here, here, and here for some links to blog posts of couples who've already done the 14 Days of Love! A couple weeks ago, my mom had a double knee replacement surgery and when she came home from the hospital, I was reminded of the importance of being organized when it comes to managing healthcare. To make it easier for everyone, I made some simple medical printables and attached them to a clipboard for easy record-keeping.
Since these organzing printables have been working out so well, I thought I'd make them available as free downloads on my blog.
First up is the Prescription Tracker which allows you to keep track of four different medications, for up to two weeks per page.
Next up is the Blood Sugar Tracker which can be used with a home glucose monitor, and is a simple way to take random blood sugar readings.
This blood pressure log is pretty self explanatory and we use it to keep track of my mom's blood pressure during her physical therapy sessions at home, and at some other random times during the week. This last printable if just to keep track of any notes and progress during my mom's physical therapy sessions. Dealing with health problems, surgeries, and other medical issues is never fun, but staying organized can help you or caregivers to gain a sense of control over situations where you may feel overwhelmed and out of control. I find it hard to work when my physical workspace is cluttered and that includes my digital workspace.
My computer desktop had become a mess lately as I had accumulated so many files, folders, and images that didn't really need to be there. It may seem silly, but I have to admit that I got a lot of satisfaction out of organzing my computer desktop in this way -- it was almost like fixing up a digital dollhouse office!
To download these wallpapers just click the links under each photo and enjoy getting organized! We all know that Etsy is a great place to find amazing handmade products and that includes things for getting organized!
For a chance to win, please visit Daffysdream and leave a comment below letting us know your favorite item from the shop. To simply learn more about Priya and her creative process, please see her About page on Etsy. What nerdy person who also happens to chronicle their running adventures doesn't like playing with numbers? NOTE: I am pretty sure I am surrendering some of my HIPAA rights by posting my numbers, but obviously because I feel pretty confident that I am healthy by all normal standards.
Glucose Tube is used in blood collection and anticoagulation for the analysis such as blood sugar, sugar tolerance, anti-alkali hemoglobin, erythrocyte electrophoresis and sugar hemolysis. Determination in stabilised anticoagualtion whole blood or plasma for glucose and lactate testing. The experimental design (including consent forms) must be approved by your fair's Scientific Review Committee (SRC).
If somebody who has diabetes wants to participate in this science project, review the safety notes at the beginning of the Procedure before starting. You can see this in the amount of glucose (a type of sugar your body uses for fuel) circulating in your blood.
The level of glucose in your blood is regulated by insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. This graph shows how a person's blood glucose levels may change over the course of a day, and how eating a meal with lots of sugar (sucrose) can affect blood glucose levels. Levels can decrease because glucose in the blood (and stored glucose) is used up during exercise. It's not as smart as you are, and it may occasionally give humorous, ridiculous, or even annoying results!
Note: You will test blood glucose levels at least 24 times, and since a lancet and test strip are needed for each test, you will need at least 24 lancets and 24 test strips that work with the monitoring system. A baseline is a typical amount that can be used to compare to experimental amounts to see if they are much larger, or smaller, than normal. Be sure to read through all of the instructions that came with the system before you start using it.
After a drop of blood has been touched to the test strip, you can read the test strip results on the blood glucose meter. Big changes in the type of food the volunteer eats could significantly affect his or her blood glucose levels (as shown in Figure 1, in the Background tab), but you are taking measurements over three days to try and account for these fluctuations.
So if your volunteer has diabetes, find out his or her schedule for the three days you will be doing exercise testing. The volunteer will exercise for 20 minutes, so make sure that the exercise planned is not too vigorous for your volunteer. Include space to record the date, time, and whether the measurements are before or after eating a meal.


Be sure to do it around the same time (right before or after the same meal you decided on in step 3) for each day. Hint: You may want to refer to the information in the Introduction to help you explain the results. Based on your results from the previous section, you will pick one of the following factors to explore over three days: (1) eating food, (2) intensity of the exercise, or (3) time spent exercising.
Research what factors affect blood glucose levels and then investigate how exactly they affect it using a blood glucose monitoring system.
Do some background research into this topic to investigate how blood glucose levels change (over time) when a person eats different foods. How do the results from urinalysis strips compare to the results from a glucose monitoring system?
If you have specific questions about your science fair project or science fair, our team of volunteer scientists can help.
Athletic trainers help athletes, and other physically active people, avoid such injuries, while also working to improve their strength and conditioning. The body gets glucose from the food you eat, and the absorption, storage and production of glucose is regulated constantly by complex processes involving the small intestine, liver and pancreas. After you eat, your body breaks down the carbohydrates in food into smaller parts, including glucose, which can be absorbed by the small intestine.
This stored glucose (glycogen) is used to maintain healthy blood-sugar levels between meals. The process is kicked off by the pancreas, which releases a hormone known as glucagon, which promotes the conversion of stored sugar (glycogen) in the liver back to glucose.
This process, known as gluconeogenesis, occurs most often during intense exercise and instances of starvation.
This chart will provide the diabetics and their family members with a better idea about normal blood sugar levels.
Participants will be treated with medications normally used for people who have had diabetes for at least one year. The UW and VA diabetes research group in Seattle is one of three recruiting adult patients for the medication trial, along with the University of Chicago and Indiana University in Indianapolis. Steven Kahn, professor of medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, at the University of Washington,  leads the Seattle clinical trial and is also chairs the national study. To be eligible, patients must be between 20 and 65 years old, have prediabetes or self-reported type 2 diabetes for less than one year, and must not have taken any medications to treat diabetes in the past.
This can also be done for your children and it sounds like fun, so I decided to do this for my husband starting on February 1st. I'm really enjoying the process so far though, and can't wait to start with the gift giving! So far, they've been very helpful and we'll be bringing the sheets with us for follow-up visits to her various doctors. Even if you're not recovering from a knee replacement surgery, you can choose to download which printable would be most useful for your particular situation.
In each column, you'd write down the name of the medication, the doctor's prescription (ie.
For example in my mom's case, she'll check her blood sugar after fasting for 8 hours on Monday, one hour after breakfast on Tuesday, two hours after lunch on Wednesday, and so on.
Each box has space for date, name of therapist, session notes, and little icons you can cross off to note whether it was a home therapy session or at a rehab center. I decided that I needed to get organized and the first step was to trash everything I no longer needed and then I moved the rest of the items to their appropriate folders.
I put all my folders on the little shelves and the bulletin board is where I put files that I'm currently working on, as well as certain applications like Sticky Note.
Priya is from India and runs an Etsy shop called Daffysdream, where she sells her beautiful handmade purse organizers. When blood glucose levels rise after eating a meal, the pancreas releases insulin, which causes cells in the body (such as liver, muscle, and fat cells) to take up glucose, removing it from the blood and storing it to use for energy. To prevent blood glucose levels from dropping too much (and causing hypoglycemia), it is sometimes recommended that people with type 1 diabetes have a snack before and while exercising. The volunteer will be exercising for 20 minutes, so make sure to pick an activity that is not too vigorous for your volunteer. To create a baseline of blood glucose levels, you will measure the volunteer's blood glucose levels over three days, twice a day: right before the volunteer eats a meal (which is called the preprandial plasma glucose) and 2 hours after they started eating the meal (called the postprandial plasma glucose). If there are too many ketones in the blood, it could mean that a person does not have enough insulin to lower his or her blood glucose levels.) The ketone results may affect whether the person can later safely do the exercise activity required for participating in this science project, and whether you may need to find a new volunteer(s) because of this. Base this on the average baseline glucose levels you determined in step 7 (and any ketone data from step 4) of the previous section, as well as any known medical history the person has. If the investigation is being done on a person with diabetes, they should talk to their doctor before doing testing. Our Experts won't do the work for you, but they will make suggestions, offer guidance, and help you troubleshoot. Should a sports injury occur, athletic trainers help to evaluate the injury, determine the treatment needed, and design a fitness regime to rehabilitate the athlete so he or she is ready to go out and compete again.
The goal for the diabetic is to attain these levels while avoiding harmful complications and maintaining far better health.
The study will enroll individuals who have prediabetes or have been recently diagnosed with diabetes, but who are not taking medications to treat the condition.
The expectation is that the use of these medications before diabetes has developed will preserve or enhance the body’s ability to produce insulin, the hormone that is crucial to maintain normal blood sugar levels. This way, they can see if there's anything we need to watch out for, or that requires further medication.
In case you're wondering what the 'M' column stands for, we just use it to note down the initial for each meal type (B for Breakfast, L for Lunch, D for Dinner, or S for Snack) for the days when my mom gets either a 1 or 2 hour blood sugar reading after meals.
Owing to the first use if special stabilizer and surface treatment inside the tube, preq glucose tube successfully solves the unavoidable hemolysis and prevent the occurrence of insoluble and anti-coagulation substances.
When the blood glucose levels start falling, the pancreas stops releasing insulin, and the stored glucose is used for energy. However, exercise can also cause blood glucose levels to increase if too much stored glucose gets released when a person exercises and it is not used up while exercising.
Some dietitians and nutritionists also work to educate people about good food choices so they can cook and eat their own healthy meals. Elizabeth has traveled throughout the Americas, studying political systems and indigenous cultures and teaching English to students of all ages. The investigators aim to enroll 85 patients who will participate in the trial for 21 months. Watch this video to see how blood glucose levels can change over time for different people.
If there is not enough insulin around, the glucose in the blood will not get stored again, and will remain in the blood (which can cause hyperglycemia). For people with diabetes, this can be addressed by taking an insulin shot after exercising. Once you have a clear idea of the effects of exercise on blood glucose levels, you will try to diminish the changes by eating food, or by changing the intensity of the exercise or the exercise time.
Type 2 diabetes occurs when a person has insulin resistance, which means the person's body does not respond to insulin, or their pancreas does not make enough insulin.
Type 2 diabetes is managed by increasing exercise, changing diet, and possibly by taking medications such as insulin.



Glucose blood test results explained pdf
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