THE MEDICAL PROFESSION WOULD have you believe that diabetes is not reversible and only controlling your blood sugar with drugs or insulin will protect you from organ damage and death. The diabetes epidemic is accelerating along with the obesity epidemic, and what you are not hearing about is another way to treat it. Type 2 diabetes, or what was once called adult onset diabetes, is increasing worldwide and now affects nearly 100 million people — and over 20 million Americans. We are seeing increasing rates of Type 2 diabetes, especially in children, which has increased over 1,000 percent in the last decade and was unknown before this generation. In a report in The New England Journal of Medicine, Walter Willett, MD, PhD, and his colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health demonstrated that 91 percent of all Type 2 diabetes cases could be prevented through improvements lifestyle and diet. Here, I want to review in detail this new way of thinking about diabetes and outline the tests I recommend to identify problems with blood sugar.
When your diet is full of empty calories, an abundance of quickly absorbed sugars and carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, etc.), the body slowly becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and needs more to do the same job of keeping your blood sugar even.
Insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome associated with it is often accompanied by increasing central obesity, fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, problems with blood clotting, as well as increased inflammation.
These clues can often be picked up decades before anyone ever gets diabetes — and may help you prevent diabetes entirely.
If you have a family history of obesity (especially around the belly), diabetes, early heart disease, or even dementia you are even more prone to this problem. Most people know about the common complications of diabetes such as heart attacks, strokes, amputations, blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage.
Diabetes and pre-diabetes ARE reversible by aggressively changing lifestyle, nutritional support, and occasionally medications. In fact many people with pre-diabetes never get diabetes, but they are at severe risk just the same.
We were highly adapted to a nutrient-dense, low-sugar, high-fiber diet rich in omega-3 fats. Now, in just one generation, they are nearly all obese and 80 percent have diabetes by the time they are 30 years old! New science shows that it’s possible, through an aggressive approach of lifestyle, nutritional support, and occasionally medications. It is important to diagnose Type 2 diabetes early, but it is often not diagnosed until very late. In fact, all doctors should aggressively diagnose pre-diabetes decades before diabetes occurs, and before any damage is done to your body.
Unfortunately, there is a continuum of risk from slightly abnormal insulin and blood sugar to full blown diabetes. In a recent study, anyone with a fasting blood sugar of over 87 was at increased risk of diabetes.
Most doctors are not concerned until the blood sugar is over 110 — or worse, over 126, which is diabetes. Insulin Glucose Challenge Test – This should be done with a 2-hour glucose challenge, 75 grams measuring fasting, 1- and 2-hour blood sugar AND insulin. Hemoglobin A1C Test – This is an important measure of glycated hemoglobin, which can be an early indicator of sugar problems.
NMR Lipid Profile – This test is slightly different from the one above as it identifies the size of your cholesterol particles.


High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Test – This is a measure of inflammation, one of the classic conditions that is both the cause and result of insulin resistance and diabetes. Fibrinogen Test – This measures your risk of clotting, which can cause heart attacks and strokes. Please leave your thoughts by adding a comment below – but remember, we can’t offer personal medical advice online, so be sure to limit your comments to those about taking back our health!
Mark Hyman MD is the Medical Director at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, the Founder of The UltraWellness Center, and a ten-time #1 New York Times Bestselling author. Blood sugar, or glucose, is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to your body's organs, muscles and nervous system. Normal blood sugar varies from person to person, but a normal range for fasting blood sugar (the amount of glucose in your blood six to eight hours after a meal) is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter.
These variations in blood-sugar levels, both before and after meals, are normal and reflect the way that glucose is absorbed and stored in the body. As the small intestine absorbs glucose, the pancreas releases insulin, which stimulates body tissues and causes them to absorb this glucose and metabolize it (a process known as glycogenesis). When glucose levels drop between meals, the body takes some much-needed sugar out of storage.
When there isn't enough glucose stored up to maintain normal blood-sugar levels, the body will even produce its own glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (such as amino acids and glycerol). Too much glucose over an extended time (hyperglycemia) can result in the destruction of nerves, lowered resistance to infection, and heart and kidney disease.
The blood sugar level test can be given in various different ways such drinking pure glucose.
For most people hearing those dreaded words that they need to come in for a blood sugar level test is a hard thing to stomach but it has to be done in order to keep them safe, healthy and happy as well as to be able to live a long and healthy lifestyle. When my grandmother was first diagnosed with diabetes many years ago, it was just a simple life changing habit of changing up some foods and diet and then knowing that she needed to monitor her sugar several times a day. One of the first steps in managing your diabetes is learning to check (monitor) your blood glucose (sugar).
Your health care team will give you a portable BG meter so you can check your BG at home, work or anywhere you may need to.
Place the drop of blood on the strip in the meter; the meter will read the blood and give you the result in seconds. Your healthcare team will review the numbers and patterns with you to help change medications and lifestyle.  In time, you may even feel comfortable making adjustments yourself based on your readings!
The University of Kansas Medical CenterThe University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression, and genetic information in the university's programs and activities. But medication and insulin can actually increase your risk of getting a heart attack or dying. Insulin resistance, when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, is primarily what causes diabetes. The high insulin leads to an appetite that is out of control, and increasing weight gain around the belly. Some may even know that it increases your risk of dementia and cancers and can cause impotence.
Therefore, I recommend early testing with anyone who has a family history of Type 2 diabetes, central abdominal weight gain or abnormal cholesterol.


Your blood sugar should be less than 80 fasting and never rise above 110 or 120 after one to two hours.
It measures sugars and proteins combining into glycated proteins called AGEs (advanced glycation end products), like the crust on bread, or the crispy top on creme brule.
An HDL or good cholesterol level under 60 and triglycerides over 100 should make you suspicious of insulin resistance. With insulin resistance or Type 2 diabetes, you develop small LDL and HDL cholesterol particles. I have seen this hundreds of times in my patients and there is no reason you can’t achieve the same thing if you apply these principles.
The body gets glucose from the food you eat, and the absorption, storage and production of glucose is regulated constantly by complex processes involving the small intestine, liver and pancreas. After you eat, your body breaks down the carbohydrates in food into smaller parts, including glucose, which can be absorbed by the small intestine. This stored glucose (glycogen) is used to maintain healthy blood-sugar levels between meals.
The process is kicked off by the pancreas, which releases a hormone known as glucagon, which promotes the conversion of stored sugar (glycogen) in the liver back to glucose.
This process, known as gluconeogenesis, occurs most often during intense exercise and instances of starvation. A lot of times your doctor will have you come into the office fasting and then ask you to drink a small bottle of pure glucose which is basically sugar water within a certain period of time and then you will be asked to either give a urine sample or a blood sample so that they can test your blood glucose level in order to see if you are a diabetic or not. Diabetes is caused by insufficient insulin production or lack of responsiveness to insulin, resulting in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels).
When I have asked her about her trials and tribulations that she has gone through she said that the worst news she got was having her come in for a blood sugar level test which would let her know if she was a full blown diabetic or not.
Your insulin should be less than 5 fasting and should never rise above 30 after one to two hours. These create inflammation and oxidative stress throughout the body, and promote heart disease and dementia and accelerating aging. They are much more dangerous than larger particles and lead to increased risk of atherosclerosis or heart disease.
In fact, anyone with a high C-reactive protein has a 1,700 percent increased risk of getting diabetes. This is entirely due to sugar and carbohydrates in our diet that cause fatty liver, liver damage, and even cirrhosis. If this sounds like you then chances are you have been faced with the dreaded blood sugar level test. There are 2 primary types of diabetes mellitus, type I (insulin-dependent or juvenile-onset), which may be caused by an autoimmune response, and type II (non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset).
I recommend this test for everyone over 50, and for anyone with any risk of insulin resistance, even children.
Elizabeth has traveled throughout the Americas, studying political systems and indigenous cultures and teaching English to students of all ages.



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Comments

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