The Accu-Chek Academy contains information specifically for healthcare professionals that have a keen interest in diabetes management. Join now to receive information on diabetes related news, tools to enable structured self-monitoring of blood glucose, exclusive offers, and more! This section is for under 18's and contains a great interactive tool to help you and your family learn more about diabetes.
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The Accu-Chek Structured Self-Monitoring blood glucose Diary is designed to help people with diabetes and health care professionals focus on achieving quality results in their diabetes management1.The Accu-Chek blood glucose diary guides you to record your blood glucose in a structured manner helping you understand and manage your diabetes.
Watch the video series for more information on how structured self-monitoring can help guide you and your healthcare team to adjust the many parts of your therapy. Your blood glucose changes throughout the day depending on different factors, such as eating, exercise, medication or illness. The diary has fields so you can record your blood glucose, insulin units, meal size and activity awareness.
By recording something like a meal size, it may assist you in understanding what caused a sudden rise or drop in your blood glucose levels. Step 5: Circle the number you think is right for the amount of physical activity you had been doing. Step 6: Finally, in the comments column you can record any dietary changes, illness, type of hypos and note any significant changes to your body, your routine or the way you feel. In the second section of the Accu-Chek blood glucose diary, you have the opportunity to complete the Accu-Chek 360 View 3-day profile. Testing before you eat will tell you about the effect your medication has on your blood glucose, while testing 2 hours after you eat tells you about the effect of your meal.
To complete the Accu-Chek 360 View 3 day profile tool, it is very similar to the front section in the diary. Step 8: Graph your blood glucose level (from Step 3) by placing an X in the corresponding row of the chart. By self-monitoring your blood glucose you can measure how your body handles different types of food, exercise, medication, stress and illness. Watch the video series to see how the results of self-monitoring can help guide you and your healthcare team to adjust the many parts of your therapy. This website contains information on products which are targeted to a wide range of audiences and could contain product details or information otherwise not accessible or valid in your country.


The normal range of blood glucose depends on many things including weight, age, and other small things. Reactive hypoglycaemia (non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome) is a seemingly rare and potentially serious complication following gastric bypass. If you think you may have low blood sugar after eating, you should measure your blood sugar level using a glucometer available at any pharmacy. You will need to experiment with foods and figure out what YOUR triggers are, and what foods work BEST to bring you back from a sugar crash. Here is what happens in experiment A, when 12 patients 2 years after gastric bypass suspected on Reactive hypoglycaemia, are given a high carbohydrate meal of 8 oz. Here is what happens when the same patients are given a low-carbohydrate meal was composed of decaffeinated black coffee or tea without sugar, 1 egg, a 1-oz. Note how the glucose level and the insulin level stay within normal levels and DO NOT SPIKE WIDELY as in experiment A.
These experiments show us why we should not treat reactive hypoglycaemia like we do in diabetics. In cases of severe hypoglycemia with loss of consciousness, immediate treatment with 3-4 glucose tablets (5 g each) or 3-4 tsp of honey should be given to patients who can swallow.
Chronically elevated cortisol inhibitis immune system function, digestion and leads to the slow detioration of the body, as physiology is shifted towards immidiated survival only. By monitoring in a structured manner, you can gain a clearer picture of how your blood glucose changes in response to those factors.
While using the Accu-Chek 360° View profiling tool you should test before and after breakfast, before and after lunch, before and after dinner, and once before you go to bed. Your blood glucose result may prompt you to eat a snack, take more insulin or go for a walk. Regularly testing your blood glucose helps measure the effectiveness of your meal plan, physical activity and medications. Please be aware that we do not take any responsibility for accessing such information which may not comply with any valid legal process, regulation, registration or usage in the country of your origin.
The glucose in the body’s main forms of energy and is really just sugar in the blood stream. For those with only small mild cases of hyperglycemia can easily manage a normal range of blood glucose with proper exercise and a proper diet. Do the test an hour before a meal, a few minutes after eating, an hour afterward, two hours after, etc.


Your food log including the times you eat and any blood sugar highs or lows on that same log will be used to spot any patterns that might develop. Make sure you are following our dietary guidelines and instructions – eat protein first, then the complex carbohydrates and lastly the healthy fats.
For example, diabetics are asked to eat candy to bring their blood sugar up quickly from an overdose of insulin (the cause of their hypoglycaemia). Monitoring before you eat (pre-meal) and 2 hours after your first bite (post-meal) can help you understand how what you eat affects your blood glucose. Self-monitoring can also alert you to a blood glucose level that is too high or too low, which requires special treatment. The symptoms of hypoglycemia are shaking, confusion, dizziness, and fainting if levels become too low.
Those who have a more serious case of diabetes much constantly watch what they eat and their blood glucose levels with a meter.
Keep a food log and keep track of your blood glucose readings at all the various times before and after meals.
Over time you’ll be able to spot trends and understand how your body is working a bit better. The rule-of-thumb is a bit of simple carbohydrates to bring the crash up quickly, then a balance of protein and fat to keep the glucose up. Plus they may have to use insulin that they inject into their blood stream to help with the blood glucose level. If the body has a constant or uneven change in the blood glucose levels it may be a sign of diabetes. Diabetics who inject themselves with too much insulin, can develop reactive hypoglycaemia because insulin drops their blood glucose to very low levels. This presence of hyperglycemia in the body generally means that the body is not producing the amount of insulin needed to convert the sugar into energy.
Low blood glucose levels can occur in certain patients after gastric bypass (exact number not known) and this can produce several symptoms of varied severity. Watching what you eat and by knowing your prescribed normal range of blood glucose levels you can watch for these.



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