Building a garden shed on a slope

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For whatever reason there is just something so appealing about working with your hands and the idea of building your own home.
I can imagine that the sense of accomplishment and pride in building something like this would be immense. I would love this for my back yard, I am a quilter and that would be great for my workshop. With Instructables you can share what you make with the world, and tap into an ever-growing community of creative experts.
Thanks to my father for introducing me to this style of shelving, and who built a particularly fine example (using stained fir 2x4s and 2x12s, black washers, and brass acorn nuts) which is at least 25 years old and still in use. We'd been meaning to build these for over a year to replace a bulky entertainment center plus some cobbled together shelving for our TV wall. The 2x2s would be strong enough, but there might not be enough contact area between the upright and the shelf. A few years after Jocie and I moved into our home, the unfinished side of the basement looked like a we still hadn’t completely unpacked. If you’ve ever felt like your home could be featured on the TV show Hoarders, you know that good storage is vitally important for every home.
Click here to jump down to where I provide step-by-step directions for building your own shelves or read on for a few thoughts about purchasing shelves. There are lots of great shelving options available, and my initial plan was to purchase some. Material: Building your own shelves probably means wood construction, but purchased shelves are available in a variety of materials that provide different benefits. I made two of these supports with ladder rungs on both sides, and two more with ladder rungs only on one side.
One reader brought up some valid concerns about using OSB- specifically strength and potential moisture problems. If you want to really buff up the structure, consider framing the OSB (or plywood) around the perimeter and adding strechers.
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Not sure why we didn’t look into building something like these ourselves in the first place, but we purchased five heavy duty plastic shelving units at HoDe for just under what you built this whole unit for.
After looking at the reference to AdvanTech sheathing, it would seem to me that if the cost wasn’t significantly higher, that might be a better choice for moisture- resistance reasons, unless it has much less strength. And yes, they serve incredibly well for pantry food storage also(canned goods, potatoes, and similar) Cedar would be expensive but it sure would help with the bugs we have here.
I have been looking for sturdy shelves to hold a record collection, but nothing in the stores that will hold the weight is within my price range. Your beefed up shelving unit will do the trick, especially with edge supports and stretchers.
This is a simple design but what you will find is the playwood will start to sag over time.
If you have an unfinished basement, a garage or a storage shed, you can store much more in it if you have shelves.
1) Cut the 4-foot-by-8-foot sheet of plywood or OSB into six pieces that are 4 feet by 16 inches. 5) Attach the plywood pieces to the tops of the shelf frames with screws — two on each long side at least, more if you’d like.
Adding a diagonal brace across the backs of the shelves will make each unit more sturdy and less likely to "fold up" under the weight of items stored on the shelves. For safety, attach at least one corner leg to a ceiling joist or something secure to stabilize the unit.
If the shelving units aren’t perfectly level, you can use shims to level them — or use the method for leveling a table from Build Your Own Table (scroll down to “Make Your Table Stable”).
Just keep the notches tight and screw(or nail) into the shelf board in the center to lock it all together. I've even used this method in a moving truck so as to allow stacking of houshold items to best use the space, then set up the shelves in the garage of new home to allow sorting while un packing.
I see a few people asking about strapping and I'm not 100% sure but I believe what they are referring to is furring strips. Fast,easy,cheap strapping, go to the supply house of your choice, look or ask in the plumbing,or hvac dept dept for strapping.
Coming from earthquake country (which we all do really) I would recommend adding some 16p nails along with the 3" screws.


Like the first post, about 25 years ago I used doors also, but I got really cheap full size interior doors. I did something similar but in the spirit of recycling I found a pack of 8 closet doors that someone was throwing out. I made similar shelves to these, although I took another approach that used a bit less lumber.
With this setup, it takes you 1 piece of plywood, 2 pieces of 2x3, 2 pieces of 2x2, and 2 pieces of 2x4. I need to make some shelves that are similar, but I need to make them lockable, any insight as to how to enclose and lock these safely?
I have made shelves similar to these and have found that using 2x2 for the shelf supports works just as well and cost less. I would like Mother Earth to show how to use PVC pipe to form a storage unit for the small and large Tote Boxes. My house burned down in 2007 and I’m looking for an alternative lifestyle with smaller space and of course a smaller budget.
One of the goals of this Instructable is to avoid the unnecessary overbuilding that I frequently see on this site, and that I see every day working in the residential construction industry.
Another book lover too , we just moved and pared our collection down to about 8,000 books . The town I live in was destroyed by earthquakes in the 1930s, but we haven't had anything significant since then. I did not see any mention of adding grooves that will ride over the all thread to keep the shelves in place.
With the right shelves, bins and probably a yard sale, you can eliminate clutter and create a well organized space. By changing the individual shelf height, you can ensure that there isn’t any wasted space from a shelf being too big or too small. You make a lot of the same cuts, there are no difficult calculations, and the shelves go together quickly. I took some time to update the post, add additional thoughts, and make the instructions easier to understand. They have a bunch of nice solid sheet metal shelves that are just bolted to 2x3s, some actually on their original supports, and a bunch more which are just sitting in their barn (along with a trailer containing a 2 story thing shelving unit that they haven’t gotten around to installing). These are white wire shelves what are pretty easy to adjust, and they used to hold dishes (LOTS of dishes) so I know they are super strong.
Perhaps enough to pull it off of the bricks depending on your span unless there was a spreader of some type. The sad thing is they aren’t wide enough to put two Rubbermaid containers side by side like the old metal units we had from our last home so we had to find boxes to put things in.
At the end of the post I describe ways to improve the strength of these shelves, and adding ribs is one of them. The way we’ve built them can easily be adapted to fit these shelves and they will be much stronger.
I run one in my concrete floor and walled partial basement to prevent mold on all my precious junk. Got a question on your own project?Ask your question in our Home Improvement Help Forums.Otherwise, leave a note here! We follow pro remodelers as they tackle tough renovations, developing step-by-step guides based on their real-life experiences. Built-in shelves are great, but if you’re renting or want the flexibility to rearrange the shelving units, you could make some free-standing shelves. Put the 13-inch pieces between the ends of the 48-inch pieces and join each corner with two screws. I've used this method in construction storage sheds for HEAVY items like jack hammers and cases of nails etc. These are much cheaper and since they will be used in a way that puts them so they are holdind the wieght with there width and not thee thickness they do a fine job. A note of intrest, you can get 3 wider shelves by cutting the plywood into 3 32" X 4' sections.
I then screwed a 2x2 to the wall, my garage has exposed framing but you can use a stud finder and do the same. At present they are stacked on top of each other and it is bothersome to get at the ones on the bottom. Good for you for sticking to your guns; see what I mean about everyone wanting to over-engineer everything?


If you need to dramatically increase the spans between uprights, or really dramatically increase the load-carrying capacity (like to hold bricks), you could use 2x material, but it shouldn't usually be necessary.
It needs to be just long enough to catch a couple of threads and snug down without punching out through the cap nut. I’ve also found that those big, Rubbermaid bins are perfect for keeping things organized. You’ll also lose a little space but the sacrifice is worthwhile especially if you plan on storing really heavy items. I got as many of these shelves as I could fit in my house, I have 5 sets in the basement, one full of dishes, one is a pantry, and the other three are just plain old storage. The difficulty usually comes in hauling it or finding shelves small enough to fit in a basement or garage space, at least that was my problem. What do you think about the addition of attaching the bottom shelf supports to the floor with concrete anchors (while still using the joists for fixed attachment at the top)?
Do I use 2×3 underneath the shelf itself and where do you anchore the 2×3 anchore supports underneath? About 58% humidity works without running a big electric bill as dehumidifiers use a lot of watts.
Here’s a simple method for building some inexpensive wood storage shelves — and you can build them without power tools. The lumberyard or building center where you buy the materials might cut the plywood for you if you don’t have a power saw. I cut 13 inches from each and used those pieces for the frames, so I had longer leftover pieces. The horizontal 2x4s decrease the access needlessly - sometimes such that a container won't fit. You will want to be sure to screw the plywood to the strips in front and back so they can't bow in or out but for holding up the wieght they will do fine. Have notice no difference between the two although I do use the plastic in wet walls,areas that are moist an to me always in applications that have vibrations,ie plumbing.
You then attach teh piece of plywood, which has a 2x3 attached to just the front edge, to this 2x2, screwing the plywood into the top of the 2x2. Name Mail (will not be published) Website Facebook Discussions on Architecture Modular Homes North Carolina Modular Homes Living Homes Building A House Cost Prefab Homes Nj What Are Modular Homes Houses To Build Custom Home Plans Morton Buildings Modular Homes In Ny Cost Of Building New HomeJoin the discussion on this Architecture Modular Homes North Carolina Modular Homes Living Homes Building A House Cost Prefab Homes Nj What Are Modular Homes Houses To Build Custom Home Plans Morton Buildings Modular Homes In Ny Cost Of Building New Home using your faceb??k account below.All contents published under GNU General Public License.
I've been having good luck recently with stain conditioner, stain, and Sherwin-Williams Fast Dry varnish.
The shelves were built and installed in about five hours, and they were by far the cheapest solution I found. This is a really good idea in case your basement ever floods and it transfers some of the weight off the floor joists. If you don’t have a table saw or circular saw handy, get the sheets cut when you purchase them at your local DIY center. I deleted all the original comments but made sure to address any questions, concerns or insights they brought to light. Since they came from a store, they were really tall (like 9-10 feet) and needed to be trimmed to fit in my short little basement.
Only needed two 8′ legs on the front and the unit is strong enough for me to climb up them even when loaded.
Or at least a block on the floor under the center of the bottom shelf, and legs in the center, the rest of the way up to the bottom of the top shelf. Accounting for the width of the saw blade, these pieces will be slightly less than 16 inches wide.
Then use a 2x4 for the vertical support, 1 at each end of the shelf, using a level to mark where to attach to the 2x4.
I plan on using 3″ drywall screws to put it together so we can disassemble and move when we move. I used 2-3 screws driven through the 2x4 into the end of the 2x3, drill pilot holes to minimize a chance of splits. Couldn't find the acorn nuts after 4 stores so I ordered them on Ebay ($10 inc shipping for a box of 50).
It cost a little over $200 when done (CT prices are high) but it is much sturdier than a Melemie shelf that would have been this price.




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