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I used to use cabinet handles for my trays but for this one I decided to route out the handles.
After the glue had dried it was time to plane everything flush before cutting the keys which I cut on the table saw with a jig.
I finished it with lacquer which I did not like so next time it will be back to wipe-on-poly. OK – maybe I don’t really need a 19th-century British officer (though it would be lovely to have a companion who knew how tea should properly be made).
Christopher Schwarz has an upcoming article on a campaign chest, and we thought it might be fun to shoot the opening picture with the piece staged inside of a white canvas tent (while in the background men in red coats shoot long rifles at disenfranchised native peoples…or not). There is an event that’s not a long ways from you, and there will be more tents and period clothing than you could shake a stick at. I just came back from a 3-day marquetry class at the David Marks School of Woodworking, and although I am physically exhausted, I also feel creatively rejuvenated!
David remains very humble about his television show and instead lets his 30+ years of woodworking experience speak for itself. I find most bought trays are very small especially when trying to take breakfast to your wife. I always do it that way round it means that if you make a mistake on the miter you can always trim a fraction off.


If anyone in the Cincinnati metro area has one we could borrow for a day or two, do let me know.
They usually have a complete camp setup from around that era, may be to early but they have both British and American units. Failing that, it seems that this is something you’re more likely to find at a place that supplies stage decorations for plays, movies, etc. They live in a modest house in the outskirts of Santa Rosa, a sleepy town located an hour drive north of San Francisco. During the 3-day class, David took us through the process of making beautiful marquetry pieces using the double-bevel marquetry technique.
David’s woodworking studio is located in the back of their property and offers 2,000+ sq-ft of space outfitted with a wide variety of power tools, workbenches, and even a complete drum set! Last year, for Christmas, my thoughtful wife gifted me a 3-day marquetry class at the David Marks’ School of Woodworking, prompting me to check out who the dude was.
He also demonstrated a lot of inlay techniques involving many different types of materials so that we could incorporate those into our work when the time comes. This was very refreshing to me since I work in the high tech industry, a field notorious for its materialism. I am looking forward to my tea chest with a beautiful flower such as the one you learned in the Marquetry Class.


One of the best thing about the class was that we got plenty of hands-on experience and each walked away with a beautiful project. There are very few craftsmen like him left in the country, and being able to spend a few days in his woodworking studio was worth every penny! As a general rule, if you want to take a class with a master woodworker, look at the pieces of art that he or she has created. We all had our own scroll saw, and were able to use beautiful wood species that David had resawn into veneers on his own band saws.
If you like their work, you’re likely to enjoy their company and benefit from the class. Then I used a round over bit to shape the handle and had to go very carefully as not to crack the wood.



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