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10.12.2014, admin  
Category: Muscle Gainer Supplements

Diet adheres to American Diabetes Association guidelines for dietary fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. I’m back from Vegas and the American Association of Diabetes Educators national conference. The first place to start when you look at the Nutrition Facts label is the serving size and the number of servings in the package. The size of the serving on the food package influences the number of calories and all the nutrient amounts listed on the top part of the label.
CALORIES AND CALORIES FROM FAT (example 2 on the food chart): Calories provide a measure of how much energy you get from a serving of this food. The General Guide to Calories provides a general reference for calories when you look at a Nutrition Facts label. The nutrients listed first are the ones Americans generally eat in adequate amounts, or even too much.
Important: Health experts recommend that you keep your intake of saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol as low as possible as part of a nutritionally balanced diet. Most Americans don't get enough dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron in their diets. Remember: You can use the Nutrition Facts label not only to help limit those nutrients you want to cut back on but also to increase those nutrients you need to consume in greater amounts.
Look at the amounts circled in red in the footnote--these are the Daily Values (DV) for each nutrient listed and are based on public health experts' advice. Look at the example below for another way to see how the Daily Values (DVs) relate to the %DVs and dietary guidance. The nutrients that have "upper daily limits" are listed first on the footnote of larger labels and on the example above.
The % Daily Values (%DVs) are based on the Daily Value recommendations for key nutrients but only for a 2,000 calorie daily diet--not 2,500 calories. Example: Look at the amount of Total Fat in one serving listed on the sample nutrition label. Nutrient Content Claims: Use the %DV to help you quickly distinguish one claim from another, such as "reduced fat" vs. Dietary Trade-Offs: You can use the %DV to help you make dietary trade-offs with other foods throughout the day. Calcium: Look at the %DV for calcium on food packages so you know how much one serving contributes to the total amount you need per day.
Experts advise adult consumers to consume adequate amounts of calcium, that is, 1,000mg or 100%DV in a daily 2,000 calorie diet. For certain populations, they advise that adolescents, especially girls, consume 1,300mg (130%DV) and post-menopausal women consume 1,200mg (120%DV) of calcium daily. Don't be fooled -- always check the label for calcium because you can't make assumptions about the amount of calcium in specific food categories.
Trans Fat: Experts could not provide a reference value for trans fat nor any other information that FDA believes is sufficient to establish a Daily Value or %DV. Important: Health experts recommend that you keep your intake of saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol as low as possible as part of a nutritionally balanced diet. Protein: A %DV is required to be listed if a claim is made for protein, such as "high in protein".


Sugars: No daily reference value has been established for sugars because no recommendations have been made for the total amount to eat in a day.
If you are concerned about your intake of sugars, make sure that added sugars are not listed as one of the first few ingredients. To limit nutrients that have no %DV, like trans fat and sugars, compare the labels of similar products and choose the food with the lowest amount. Answer: As you can see, they both have the same amount of calcium, but the nonfat milk has no saturated fat and has 40 calories less per serving than the reduced fat milk. But whatever the reason, many consumers would like to know how to use this information more effectively and easily.
The bottom part (see #5 on the sample label below) contains a footnote with Daily Values (DVs) for 2,000 and 2,500 calorie diets.
Pay attention to the serving size, especially how many servings there are in the food package.
Many Americans consume more calories than they need without meeting recommended intakes for a number of nutrients. It refers to the Footnote in the lower part of the nutrition label, which tells you "%DVs are based on a 2,000 calorie diet".
Upper limits means it is recommended that you stay below - eat "less than" - the Daily Value nutrient amounts listed per day.
This amount is recommended for a balanced daily diet that is based on 2,000 calories, but can vary, depending on your daily intake of fat and protein. Remember, a food with 20%DV or more contributes a lot of calcium to your daily total, while one with 5%DV or less contributes a little. This advice is often given in milligrams (mg), but the Nutrition Facts label only lists a %DV for calcium.
Example: the amount of calcium in milk, whether skim or whole, is generally the same per serving, whereas the amount of calcium in the same size yogurt container (8oz) can vary from 20-45 %DV.
Scientific reports link trans fat (and saturated fat) with raising blood LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels, both of which increase your risk of coronary heart disease, a leading cause of death in the United States. Otherwise, unless the food is meant for use by infants and children under 4 years old, none is needed. Keep in mind, the sugars listed on the Nutrition Facts label include naturally occurring sugars (like those in fruit and milk) as well as those added to a food or drink. The plain yogurt on the left has 10g of sugars, while the fruit yogurt on the right has 44g of sugars in one serving.
Other names for added sugars include: corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit juice concentrate, maltose, dextrose, sucrose, honey, and maple syrup.
The following label-building skills are intended to make it easier for you to use nutrition labels to make quick, informed food choices that contribute to a healthy diet. This footnote provides recommended dietary information for important nutrients, including fats, sodium and fiber. Answer: 110 calories, which means almost half the calories in a single serving come from fat. Eating too much fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, or sodium may increase your risk of certain chronic diseases, like heart disease, some cancers, or high blood pressure. Eating enough of these nutrients can improve your health and help reduce the risk of some diseases and conditions.


If you follow this dietary advice, you will stay within public health experts' recommended upper or lower limits for the nutrients listed, based on a 2,000 calorie daily diet.
This means it is recommended that you eat "at least" this amount of dietary fiber per day. It helps you interpret the numbers (grams and milligrams) by putting them all on the same scale for the day (0-100%DV). When a food you like is high in fat, balance it with foods that are low in fat at other times of the day. Current scientific evidence indicates that protein intake is not a public health concern for adults and children over 4 years of age. Note that no added sugars or sweeteners are in the list of ingredients for the plain yogurt, yet 10g of sugars were listed on the Nutrition Facts label.
The footnote is found only In the following Nutrition Facts label we have colored certain sections to help you focus on those areas that will be explained in detail. For example, getting enough calcium may reduce the risk of osteoporosis, a condition that results in brittle bones as one ages (see calcium section below). But the remaining information in the full footnote may not be on the package if the size of the label is too small. Note how the DVs for some nutrients change, while others (for cholesterol and sodium) remain the same for both calorie amounts. But you can still use the %DV as a frame of reference whether or not you consume more or less than 2,000 calories. 18%DV, which is below 20%DV, is not yet high, but what if you ate the whole package (two servings)? Also, pay attention to how much you eat so that the total amount of fat for the day stays below 100%DV. This is because there are no added sugars in plain yogurt, only naturally occurring sugars (lactose in the milk).
That doubles the calories and other nutrient numbers, including the %Daily Values as shown in the sample label. Additionally, a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grain products that contain dietary fiber, particularly soluble fiber, and low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. It doesn't change from product to product, because it shows recommended dietary advice for all Americans--it is not about a specific food product. Instead each nutrient is based on 100% of the daily requirements for that nutrient (for a 2,000 calorie diet).
Coming from just one food, that amount leaves you with 64% of your fat allowance (100%-36%=64%) for all of the other foods you eat that day, snacks and drinks included.
It's easy to see which foods are higher or lower in nutrients because the serving sizes are generally consistent for similar types of foods, (see the comparison example at the end) except in a few cases like cereals.



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