A plantar wart (also known as "Verruca plantaris"[1]:405) is a wart caused by the human papillomavirus occurring on the sole or toes of the foot. Plantar warts are benign epithelial tumors caused by infection by human papilloma virus types 1, 2, 4, or 63[3]. Warts may spread through autoinoculation, by infecting nearby skin or by infecting walking surfaces. A plantar wart is a small lesion that appears on the sole of the foot and typically resembles a cauliflower, with tiny black petechiae (tiny hemorrhages under the skin) in the center. Plantar warts are often similar to calluses or corns, but can be differentiated by close observation of skin striations. Because plantar warts are spread by contact with moist walking surfaces, they can be prevented by not walking barefoot in public areas such as showers or communal changing rooms (wearing flip flops or sandals helps), not sharing shoes and socks, and avoiding direct contact with warts on other parts of the body or on other people. Once a person is infected, there is no evidence that any treatment eliminates HPV infection or decreases infectivity, and warts may recur after treatment because of activation of latent virus present in healthy skin adjacent to the lesion.


Keratolytic chemicals The treatment of warts by keratolysis involves the peeling away of dead surface skin cells with trichloroacetic acid or salicylic acid, which can be prescribed by a physician in a higher concentration than that found in over-the-counter products. Immunotherapy Intralesional injection of antigens (mumps, candida or trichophytin antigens USP) is a new wart treatment which may trigger a host immune response to the wart virus, resulting in wart resolution. Chemotherapy Topical application of dilute glutaraldehyde (a virucidal chemical, used for cold sterilization of surgical instruments) is an older effective wart treatment. A ~7mm plantar wart surgically removed from patient's footsole after other treatments failed.
A common surgical method involves cryosurgery using liquid nitrogen; this method produces a blister under the wart. A layer of plastic wrap is cut slightly larger than the surface area of the wart(s), and then affixed firmly with a bandage. Skin striae go around plantar warts; if the lesion is not a plantar wart, the cells' DNA is not altered and the striations continue across the top layer of the skin.


Plantar warts tend to be painful on application of pressure from either side of the lesion rather than direct pressure, unlike calluses (which tend to be painful on direct pressure instead). Despite the excess moisture of sweat, the lack of oxygen speeds the degeneration of the wart and surrounding skin; especially in combination with other treatments that gradually expose the root, such as salicylic acid.
Because of pressure on the sole of the foot or finger, the wart is pushed inward and a layer of hard skin may form over the wart. It is the most effective treatment of all and does not leave scars, but it is generally a last resort treatment, as it is expensive and painful, and multiple laser treatments are required (generally 4-6 treatments repeated once a month until the wart disappears).



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Comments to «How to remove plantar wart on toe»

  1. AtMoSFeR writes:
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  2. 0110 writes:
    Fasciitis went away by calf stretching final time rolling of the foot, which is noticed with flat feet.
  3. NATHASA writes:
    Fall into disuse and eventually weaken foot.