The human foot has 42 muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 50 ligaments and tendons made of strong fibrous tissues to keep all the moving parts together … plus 250,000 sweat glands. Many foot problems, including hammertoes, blisters, bunions, corns and calluses, heel spurs, claw and mallet toes, ingrown toenails, toenail fungus, and athlete’s foot, can develop due to neglect, ill-fitting shoes, and simple wear and tear. Caused by a fungus that likes warm, dark, and moist environments like the areas between the toes or on the bottoms of the feet, athlete’s foot can inflame the skin and cause a white, scaly rash with a red base. A bunion is a crooked big-toe joint that sticks out at the base of the toe, forcing the big toe to turn in. Corns and calluses form after repeated rubbing against a bony area of the foot or against a shoe.
Claw toe causes all toes except the big toe to curl downward at the middle of the joints and curl up at the joints where the toes and the foot meet.
With mallet toes, the last joint of the toe bulges, and a painful corn will grow near the toenail.
Throwing foot bones out of alignment and producing the characteristic bump at the joint's base, a bunion can be very painful due to pressure or arthritis and may also lead to corns. Bunions have various causes, including congenital deformities, arthritis, trauma, and heredity. If you don’t cut them properly, the corners or sides of the nail can dig into skin and become ingrown. Painkillers, pads to cushion the bunion, custom shoe inserts or surgery may help, as will wearing roomy shoes and avoiding high heels.


The foot’s myriad parts, including the toes, heel, and ball, work in harmony to get you from one place to another. You can avoid athlete’s foot (also called tinea pedis) by keeping your feet and toes clean and dry and by changing your shoes and socks regularly. Early on, wearing inserts or foot pads can help reposition your toe, but later it becomes fixed in the bent position. A bunion can be painful when confined in a shoe, and for many people, shoes that are too narrow in the toe may be to blame for the formation of bunions. Calluses form on the bottom of the foot, especially under the heels or balls, and on the sides of toes. Plantar fasciitis is a painful disorder in which the tissue that connects the ball of the foot to the heel – the fascia – becomes inflamed. While tight shoes can be blamed for claw toes, so can nerve damage to the feet (from diabetes or other conditions), which weakens foot muscles. Other causes of ingrown toenails include shoe pressure, a fungus infection, and even poor foot structure.
Corns and callusesFriction causes the thick, hardened, dead skin of corns and calluses, which form to protect sensitive skin.
Clean the area thoroughly, then sterilize a sewing needle and use it to open the part of the blister located nearest to the foot’s underside. Surgery is often recommended to treat bunions, after conservative treatment methods like over-the-counter pain relievers and footwear changes fail.


Appearing cone-shaped, corns point into the skin and usually occur on areas that bear little weight. To relieve the pain, you may want to try placing moleskin or padding around corns and calluses. Athlete's footA fungal infection that can cause peeling, redness, itching, burning and sometimes blisters and sores, athlete's foot is mildly contagious, passed by direct contact or by walking barefoot in areas such as changing rooms or near pools. Athlete's foot is usually treated with topical antifungal creams or oral medication for more severe cases. Hammertoe generally causes the middle joint of the toe to bend downward, with toes appearing raised near the foot. Well-fitting footwear with the correct amount of space around the toes, shoe supports and surgery may offer relief.
For mild cases, soak the foot in warm water, keep it clean, and gently push the skin away from the nail using a cotton bud. Flatfoot (pes planus)Flatfoot is characterised by the sole of the foot coming into complete or near-complete contact with the ground.
Treatment includes foot-strengthening exercises and shoes with good arch support or orthotics.




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Category: Swollen Feet


Comments to «Foot problems corns bunions»

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