Some runners have experienced pain in the bottom of their foot. Metatarsalgia, or better know as the ball of the foot pain, is actually a common injury in runners.
Having a lot pressure on your forefoot can cause pain and inflammation in your metatarsals which is the long bones in the front of your feet, just below your toes.
Morton’s neuroma- is an injury to the nerve between the toes, which causes thickening and pain. Using insoles in your shoes- Using some moleskin, or Metatarsalgia insoles will help absorb some shock when you run so your foot doesn’t receive all of the force.
Over-the-counter pain reliever- Taking something like Advil, or Aleve can help ease the pain. I have actually been bugged by some pain in my feet lately — likely need a new pair of shoes.
I have these symptoms, but ONLY when running and it only starts after about an hour or running.
Many types of discomfort can be ignored or worked around, but if you are experiencing pain in the bottom of your feet, it will have a large impact on the quality of your life. The single most important step you can take to reduce the incidence of all the conditions listed above is to acquire and regularly wear proper foot gear. I've been running for 11 weeks doing the Couch to 10K program, with 8-9 weeks of that being in Vibram FiveFingers Bikila LS. The toes hurt in the area right around where the above image is marked "Toe cramps" and feel more numb and less painful toward the ends of the toes.
Translation: if your calves are tight, you run in a way that puts more pressure on the ball of your foot. My husband uses this app occasionally and helps ease the pain and along with ice helps with the recovery. As a runner, I believe running in properly fitted shoes with good arch support and proper cushioning is extremely important. I ran 4 miles last night, after a couple of weeks off and experienced the same pain all day.


By wearing correctly-fitting and activity-appropriate footwear to begin with, there will be minimal pressure placed on the ball of the foot, which means that this condition is less likely to develop.
These include tissue inflammation in the arch of the foot, heel spurs, pinched nerves, and bone fractures caused by years of participation in high-impact sports. For ladies, this means saving high heels for special occasions only and making sure that your daily footwear does not strain any part of the foot. As I've steadily increased the amount of running in my workout, I've started experiencing toward the end of my workout (last 10 minutes or so) a semi-painful almost numbing sensation from slightly behind the base of my toes to the ends of the two toes nearest my big toe on my left foot only. Changing the distribution of weight on my foot as I run doesn't seem to help any with the pain once it starts. If you have a fallen arch cauaed by weakness, you should also do foot-strengthening exercises. I have had foot surgery for bunion and hammer toe on the right foot and now have a non union (for 7 years) from that surgery. Yes I waited 6 days and went to emerg (small town), on naproxen and no running for 1 more week. Foot pain simply cannot be ignored and this is why you should take steps to understand the kind of pain you are experiencing so that you can get the proper treatment.
In general, pain in this area is referred to as metatarsalgia, which is a condition that can affect both the bones in the region and the base joints of the toes.
Most people will experience heel pain to some degree from time to time, and it does not always indicate a serious underlying condition. Sports enthusiasts must wear well-fitting shoes that are designed for the sport in question, in this way preventing the bottom of foot pain.
The pain goes away just a few minutes after my workout is completed and I've taken a short break. Running and jumping increase the risk of metatarsalgia, and anything that increases impact on your feet makes it worse.
One of the benefits of barefoot running is that it strengthens your ankles by strengthening the lower legs muscles that support them.


The first thing to do to eliminate this type of bottom of foot pain is to switch to properly fitted shoes and give up high heels.
However, pain that continues even when you are sitting or lying down, or pain so intense that it interferes with sleep should be investigated without delay. After that, treatment for the heel area will vary depending on the exact cause of the pain. In some cases, this can be traced back to shoes that do not fit well, including those that do not allow sufficient room for the toes, causing the foot to be constricted in a cramped area.
Metatarsalgia can also be caused by a fallen metatarsal arch (the arch that goes across the ball of the foot). Other causes include wearing high heels, which by their design cause extra pressure to fall on the ball of the foot, and participating in high-impact sports while wearing inadequate footwear. Exercises and stretches may be prescribed to loosen up the tissue in the arch of the foot, thereby reducing inflammation causing pain in the heel.
I imagine that running on high-impact surfaces like concrete would also increase your risk (grass and asphalt have more give).
When it comes to heel spurs, which are little hooks of bone that grow on the heel bone, stretching may also prove effective because it can help pull tissue away from the spur; it is the spur digging into surrounding ligaments that is causing the pain. Similar drugs can be used to treat pinched nerves causing pain in the bottom of the foot, but sometimes injections of cortisone are also called for. Better fitting shoes and orthotic inserts can also prove helpful in reducing pain from a pinched nerve.



Custom insoles for running
Sore feet ballet
Advanced foot care & orthotics
Gelpolster high heels


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