Social media in hiring decisions,job search unemployment extension for 2014,work at home scams complaints,flexible jobs in atlanta - New On 2016

26.07.2015
Considering the popularity of social media sites here in Hawaii, your company may be thinking about or already utilizing this recruitment method as a way to find good candidates.
One of the biggest concerns with using social media in the hiring process is discrimination. If you make a negative employment decision after viewing an applicant’s social networking profile—even if you never considered that information in a biased manner—you may find your organization subject to a discrimination claim. One argument for using social media as a hiring tool is that it gives you an inside look into whether or not an applicant would be a good fit with your company.
Not only is social media a poor predictor of whether or not a candidate will last at a company, the study also found that evaluations of people based on their Facebook profiles are no better at predicting employees’ cognitive ability, self-efficacy, and personality than traditional methods, such as interviewing and checking references. Whether or not you use social media for hiring, we can probably all agree that the objective of a job search is to find qualified candidates that fit with the culture of your company and represent your business well. After all, a whopping 93 percent of recruiters who responded to the survey will use social media to evaluate perspective candidates in 2014. You may be able to discover the “real” person applying for a job with you by viewing the person’s postings on social media sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.


In my view, it’s probably wise to use information gleaned from social media to supplement rather than supplant a resume and personal interview. In fact, a recent survey of almost 1,000 recruitment professionals found that 73% of respondents use social media platforms, like Facebook, to evaluate applicants. However, using social media to make hiring decisions can cause problems if you’re not careful. Viewing a candidate’s social media page gives your company access to information you probably wouldn’t know unless the candidate came in for a face-to-face interview, such as race, ethnicity, and age.
Just remember that once you look at a candidate’s social media page, there’s no going back, and it could put you at risk when it comes to defending the legality of your hiring decision. For example, looking at a candidate’s social media page may give you an idea of their personality and attitude or even their communication and spelling skills.
If you decide that social media is what best helps you achieve this goal, make sure that you are taking proper precautions to ensure that your actions are legally sound and won’t get your company in trouble. And ask an employment law attorney to review your hiring practices so you know you’re operating within the law.


In fact, a recent survey of almost 1,000 recruitment professionals found that 73 percent of respondents use social media platforms, like Facebook, to evaluate applicants. Your company may want to tread lightly when it comes to using social media to make hiring decisions for two reasons: First, there’s the potential to run into legal trouble, such as discrimination charges, and second, social media evaluations may not be a good prediction of a candidate’s job performance. Your company may want to tread lightly when it comes to using social media to make hiring decisions for two reasons: First, there’s the potential to run into legal trouble, such as discrimination charges.
After all, with the increasingly competitive job market, your social presence can give you a much-needed edge to land the job that truly plays to your passions.
Second, social media evaluations may not be a good prediction of a candidate’s job performance. Not only is social media a poor predictor of whether or not a candidate will last at a company, the study also found that evaluations of people based on their Facebook profiles are no better at predicting employees’ cognitive ability, self-efficacy, and personality than traditional methods, such as interviews and checking references.



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Comments to «Social media in hiring decisions»

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