Negative effects of social media and hiring,is social media for b2b,social media websites for businesses,civil engineering jobs in illinois - New On 2016

19.02.2015
As with Finding a job, and everything else, Social Media has a positive effect, but only when used correctly.
Be extra careful, and don't post anything that you don't want a prospective employer (or your mom!) to read.
There is a robust conversation in the talent arena about “candidate experience” led largely by Gerry Crispin and Elaine Orler, founders of the Talent Board and the Candidate Experience Awards (#CandE). It’s also more likely that Best-in-Class organizations (compared with all other organizations) will focus on the development of a talent community to reach candidates and improve the candidate experience.
Candidates expect much of the same things as consumers, for example, in ease of use and clear user-interfaces. A good way to think about whether or not your organization is prioritizing the candidate experience may be to ask if candidates are treated with a comparable amount of respect and attention as customers. As HR and other leaders grapple with high turnover rates among the Gen Y cohort (see last week’s post here), all kinds of issues get raised. The Aberdeen Group published Onboarding 2013: A new Look at New Hires last month and author Madeline Laurano provides data that might help organizations become more effective in retaining the youngest of their workforce. But, as the graph below shows, there’s lots of opportunity to make onboarding programs more robust, strategic and productive by spending more time.
But still, only 26% of Best-in-Class employers enroll new hires in learning and development programs compared to 11% of all others. Laurano concludes the report with recommended actions for employers in Best-in-Class, Average and Laggard categories. Think about these as you and other leaders in your organization wrestle with the high turnover rate in your Gen Y employees. Third, and most interesting to me, is the impact of the legal uncertainty for using social media as a source of background screening information. I guarantee that hiring managers make the time because they think checking out “social” behavior is extremely relevant. This report brings up some great questions for recruiters and hiring managers and shows the need, I think, for greater communication between these two groups.
As background, The Talent Board was formed in January 2011 to assist recruiting organizations in understanding and evaluating the experiences of their candidates.
The Talent Board founders, Gerry Crispin, Elaine Orler and Ed Newman and their colleagues have just produced the 2012 Candidate Experience report from their survey and awards program.


But for most, the topic of most interest is the infamous “black hole” – that old familiar experience of applying for a job by filling out an application on line, attaching a resume to an online application or email, or using snail mail to send in a resume … and never getting a response.
SmartRecruiters, a two-year old recruitment platform for social enterprises, published the findings of a survey of 1,100 online adults on today’s hiring process.
With more than 15 million Americans looking for work (and another several million who have given up), employers settling for good enough because their systems are cumbersome and selection is hard and there are lots of candidates shortchanges the business and ensures a workforce that won’t deliver on the organization’s goals and strategies. With more than 15 million Americans looking for work (and another several million who have given up), using pre-existing data like profiles on LinkedIn and Facebook can only improve the efficiency of the process. Some really smart people in the recruiting field are stepping out on the edge and calling attention to the need for better candidate experience practices by creating an award to recognize those organizations whose processes show that attending to candidates in a more respectful way has a positive impact on their ability to build talent communities and to actually hire the talent they need. But at this current point in time social media is moving more towards the negative end when it comes to careers.
Never use social media specially Facebook or twitter as a medium to vent out frustrations and rant about your work related problems. Extending referrals into other stakeholder groups makes a great deal of sense – and correlates to higher quality candidates. Between 2013 and 2014, organizations increased their amount of focus on building strong relationships with candidates by more than five times. These companies are 30% more likely to invest in new technologies such as social, mobile and video to make recruiting engaging for candidates, in comparison with all other organizations (60% vs.
Aberdeen’s study found that organizations prioritizing the candidate experience are twice as likely to improve their cost-per-hire and are expected to have a larger budget for talent acquisition efforts in the coming year (compared to organizations who do not prioritize the candidate experience). In a 2013 study by Aberdeen, 62% of Best-in-Class organizations reported giving candidates visibility into their application status through resources like automated emails and online platforms like candidate career portals (although just 33% of organizations feel they have an engaging career portal).
One of the quickest routes to ROI is the improvement of productivity and that’s something organizations can measure.
Staying on top of EEOC guidance is, of course, a critical part of HR’s regulatory and risk mitigation obligations. And it goes without saying that having pictures that exhibit weapons of any kind as well as any illegal drug usage or nudity should be removed!c. It highlights Intuit’s approach to embracing a social approach to the apply process, with a particular focus on making the application process streamlined and device agnostic “with equal attention paid to user experience and interface on both desktop and mobile.” Bill is a legend for a reason and his approach to this topic in the whitepaper is compelling.
Take a look below: If you’re in the 23% of employers without a candidate referral program, this might be a wake up and smell the coffee moment.


According to another 2013 study from Aberdeen, candidates who start as customers of the companies they apply to are 3.2 times more likely to describe their relationship as an applicant as positive rather than negative. Other drivers for looking at new ways to onboard new hires include improving employee engagement, reducing turnover and improving new hire assimilation.
Even if you can’t spend real money to make your onboarding program more productive, you can certainly get smarter about what works and make some adjustments based on data to improve your outcomes.
And trust no one from your work environments; it is most likely the friendly one that adds you first on Facebook who could potentially report you to the HR department or management for any such activity.
No matter the industry, a candidate’s application experience should be a top priority simply because their perceptions of the process (whether they get the job or not) can have a serious impact on an organization’s brand, customers, and success. Organizations should take heart that creating a focused and engaging candidate experience does not need to be a difficult process. The data are beginning to provide clear evidence that, to paraphrase Vineet Nayar, perhaps candidates come first, employees second and customers third….
And so, “onboarding programs have fallen short and become little more than a transition from recruitment to employee development.” Interesting.
Contemporizing the process with technology (building a talent community and active pipeline) is an important step, but organizations can start also to prioritize the experience by changing the system they have in place now. Those corporate folks responsible for filling out surveys like this – in the recruiting function – know the legal quicksand that is forming around the use of social media for employment screening and are clear that their formal guidelines restrict the use of Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, blogs, etc. And treating potential candidates like consumers, that is, making it as easy for them to press the “apply” button as it is to press the “buy” button seems like a tenant from Econ 101.
This could mean catering to the highly connected, tech savvy candidates of today by not only reaching out to them post-application and interview, but also soliciting feedback from them during the application process (helping organizations better understand holes in their candidate experience).
And think what meaning is derived from it about the employer’s brand, culture, management, products and services. In fact, I think it’s a fair bet that although many employers are specific in excluding social networking sites for candidate background screening, as reported in this report, hiring managers do it anyway.



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