Career demands in canada,social media and marketing courses,managing social media sites - You Shoud Know

30.04.2015
Creating the Canada Job Grant, which will directly connect skills training with employers and jobs for Canadians. Renegotiating the $1.95-billion-per-year Labour Market Development Agreements with provinces and territories to reorient training toward labour market demand.
Reforming and extending the Opportunities Fund with ongoing funding of $40 million per year starting in 2015–16 to provide more demand-driven training solutions for persons with disabilities. Reallocating $19 million over two years to promote education in fields where there is high demand from employers. Confirming support for Pathways to Education Canada, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping youth in low-income communities graduate from high school and successfully transition into post-secondary education.
Confirming the Government’s commitment to consult with First Nations across Canada on the development of a First Nation Education Act and committing to share this draft legislation with First Nations communities for their input.
Currently, there are thousands of jobs available across Canada that are going unfilled, which restricts Canada’s growth prospects. 1 The job vacancy rate is defined as the number of online job postings divided by total labour demand, that is, job postings plus occupied positions (total employment). Engineers Canada projects that 95,000 professional engineers will retire by 2020 and Canada will face a skills shortage because the workforce cannot be replaced fast enough.
The Environmental Careers Organization of Canada says that with 100,000 employees reaching retirement in the next decade, numerous opportunities are opening up for students and new graduates in the sector. The Conference Board of Canada predicts that by 2020 the gap between the supply and demand of truck drivers will be 25,000 to 33,000. The Canadian Restaurant and Foodservices Association states that over 30 per cent of restaurants in Canada report that a shortage of skilled labour is having a negative effect on their business.
In addition to these current labour market challenges, Canada’s demographics are changing. To connect Canadians with jobs, the Government invests significant funding in education and training, which includes nearly $2.7 billion annually through Labour Market Agreements, Labour Market Development Agreements, and Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities. Over $10 billion annually is invested by the Government in support of post-secondary education, which includes providing students with financial assistance such as Canada Student Loans and Canada Student Grants.
As part of its plan for jobs, growth and long-term prosperity, the Government is moving forward with a three-point plan to address challenges in connecting Canadians with available jobs. Economic Action Plan 2013 announces that the Government will transform skills training in Canada through the introduction of the Canada Job Grant, as part of the renewal of the Labour Market Agreements in 2014–15. In Budget 2007, the Government introduced the Labour Market Agreements with an investment of $3 billion over six years to assist Canadians who are low-skilled or not eligible for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits. The Government will negotiate a transformation of the Labour Market Agreements with provinces and territories, to ensure that skills training funds are being used to help Canadians obtain the qualifications they need to get jobs in high-demand fields. Upon full implementation of the Grant under the Labour Market Agreements, nearly 130,000 Canadians each year are expected to be able to access the training they need to take gainful employment or improve their skills for in-demand jobs. Under the new Labour Market Agreements, provinces and territories will deliver the Canada Job Grant directly to businesses and Canadians, in addition to other training they provide. Businesses with a plan to train unemployed and underemployed Canadians for an existing job or a better job will be eligible to apply for a Canada Job Grant. The Canada Job Grant could provide $15,000 per person or more for training, which includes up to $5,000 in federal contributions. The Grant will be for short-duration training, and will include eligible training institutions, including community colleges, career colleges and trade union training centres. The Government will work in cooperation with its provincial and territorial partners to transform the way Canadians get training to help achieve our shared objectives of creating jobs and economic growth.
Canada faces a shortage of skilled tradespeople that is expected to grow in the future as the population ages. Since 2006, the Government has recognized the importance of apprentices to Canada’s economy and to this end has committed financial support to apprentices and the employers that hire them.
The fees eligible for the Tuition Tax Credit were extended starting in 2011 to include occupational, trade and professional examinations required to obtain a professional status, or certification or licence in order to practise a profession or trade in Canada. Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes to support the use of apprentices through federal procurement, the Investment in Affordable Housing, and as part of the new Building Canada plan for infrastructure. The Panel consulted widely with Canadian firms of all sizes in a broad range of sectors across the country. Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes a time-limited $2-million investment to support the creation of the Canadian Employers Disability Forum. The Forum, an initiative led by a number of Canadian businesses including Loblaw Companies Limited, will be managed by employers, for employers, to facilitate education, training and sharing of resources and best practices concerning the hiring and retention of persons with disabilities. The Canadian Mental Health Association—Winnipeg Region received $50,000 to improve accessibility at its facility by widening doorways, building an accessible washroom, lowering sinks and counters, and installing accessible door handles, light switches and interior tactile signage. Providing young Canadians with access to the information and opportunities necessary to make informed training and employment choices and gain valuable skill sets will positively shape their future and contribute to Canada’s overall economic prosperity.
It is important for young Canadians to have access to information on a variety of careers in order to make informed choices about their education early in life.
Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes to reallocate $19 million over two years to inform young people about fields of study that are relevant to existing and forecasted demand for labour in particular occupations.
Economic Action Plan 2013 confirms that the Government will extend its support to Pathways to Education Canada.
Through Budget 2010, the Government invested in Pathways to Education Canada, a not-for-profit organization that provides a suite of supports for students in low-income communities, including tutoring and mentoring, in partnership with the private sector, other levels of government and community organizations.


Pathways to Education Canada is working with local partners in 12 sites across Canada to support nearly 4,000 youth in pursuing the completion of their secondary studies. Although Canada boasts high levels of post-secondary achievement, the transition to a first job can be challenging. To ease this transition, the Career Focus program supports paid internships for recent post-secondary graduates, ensuring they get valuable hands-on work experience. Between 2009 and 2012, over 200 paid internships were provided through the Environmental Careers Organization of Canada to unemployed or underemployed recent post-secondary graduates. Between 2009 and 2012, BioTalent Canada provided practical work experience to over 90 post-secondary graduates and allowed them to gain the necessary biotechnology competencies (business and science) through internships in order to secure permanent employment and contribute to industry competitiveness as a whole. The Government of Canada is also working to facilitate training through employment partnerships between business and Aboriginal organizations. Aboriginal youth represent the fastest-growing demographic in Canada, and the country is experiencing skills and labour shortages in a range of industries.
Economic Action Plan 2013 confirms the Government’s commitment to consult with First Nations across Canada on the development of a First Nation Education Act and is committing to sharing this draft legislation with First Nations communities for their input. The Government will continue to consult with First Nations across Canada on the development of legislation and is committing to sharing draft legislation with First Nations communities for their input. Many Aboriginal peoples may not start a business career because they do not have access to business-sector role models to help them along the way.
The Government has made significant progress implementing long overdue reforms to Canada’s immigration system with a focus on attracting talented newcomers with the skills and experience that our economy requires. Through these reforms, the Government is strengthening Canada’s immigration system, moving to a proactive system that helps to foster economic growth and ensure long-term prosperity for all Canadians.
To support the work of governments in the development of a pan-Canadian framework for foreign credential assessment and recognition and ensure that immigrants are better integrated into the Canadian labour force, Budget 2009 provided $50 million over two years. The Government recognizes that quick and seamless access to jobs in Canada is essential for the integration of newcomers.
Building on this progress, over the next two years, the Government will work with provinces and territories and stakeholders to support improvements to foreign credential recognition processes and address the demand for skilled workers in Canada in additional occupations.
The Government will take action to reform Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program to ensure that Canadians are given the first chance at available jobs. In order to help unemployed Canadians get back to work and ensure that Canadians are given the first chance at available jobs, the Government is taking action to reform Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Work with employers to ensure that temporary foreign workers are relied upon only when Canadians genuinely cannot fill those jobs.
Increase the recruitment efforts that employers must make to hire Canadians before they will be eligible to apply for temporary foreign workers, including increasing the length and reach of advertising. Assist employers who legitimately rely on temporary foreign workers, due to a lack of qualified Canadian applicants, find ways to ensure that they have a plan to transition to a Canadian workforce over time. Economic Action Plan 2013 announces the Government’s intention to test new approaches to attracting immigrant investors to Canada. In Economic Action Plan 2012, the Government committed to attracting investment for Canadian companies as well as successful entrepreneurs through the Business Immigration Program. Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes $42 million over two years to meet growing demand under the Temporary Resident Program. Each year, Canada typically welcomes over 1 million tourists, temporary foreign workers and foreign students.
For many newcomers, becoming a Canadian citizen is a significant step, creating a stronger bond to the economic and social fabric of Canada. The Government recognizes that international education is a key driver of Canada’s economy and future prosperity. Budget 2011 announced the creation of an Advisory Panel on Canada’s International Education Strategy, and Dr.
Provide $10 million over two years for international marketing activities, including targeted market plans for priority markets, better promotion of a cohesive Canadian education brand, and a sophisticated web marketing strategy. Provide $13 million over two years to the Mitacs Globalink Program to attract highly promising students from around the world to Canadian universities and to allow Canadian students to take advantage of training opportunities abroad. Today there are an estimated 500,000 people working in the Canadian petroleum industry, and jobs in oil and gas are projected to increase over the next five to 10 years as energy demands increase and older workers retire. A 2008 international energy outlook report predicted that worldwide energy demand will increase by 50% by 2030.
Considering Canada has the second largest oil reserves in the world after Saudi Arabia, Canada will play an increasingly important role in helping meet the world these energy demands. And meeting these demands requires an increased need for Canadians to work in the petroleum industry.
That’s why employers are trying to increase the diversity of this job sector by appealing to aboriginal Canadians, women, immigrants and youth through competitive benefits programs and flexible schedules. To learn about which oil and gas careers your education and interests fit into, check out the Choose Your Future In Oil and Gas interactive quiz on the Careers In Oil and Gas website. You can then conduct further research on the careers provided by assessing education and training required, work conditions and links to other resources to help in your career planning. TalentEgg’s Petroleum Career Guide and this editorial feature were produced in partnership with the Petroleum Labour Market Information (PetroLMI) Division of Enform. To create this year’s list, we started by combing through data provided by Statistics Canada on more than 600 job categories.


With that in mind, we also account for how much competition there will be for these jobs in the future using data from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, which projects future labour supply and demand to 2020. If a career that’s always threatening cuts doesn’t appeal to you but you still want a job that offers increasingly better pay, then prepare to get your hands dirty.
The worst jobs in Canada, also ranked by demand and recent salary growth (or a lack thereof). While Canada’s job creation record since 2006 has been the best among the advanced economies of the Group of Seven (G-7), there is an opportunity to do more. In fact, CIBC World Markets stated in a report in December 2012[1] that 30 per cent of businesses in Canada are facing a skilled labour shortage. Over $10 billion annually is invested by the Government in support of post-secondary education, which includes providing students with financial assistance such as Canada Student Loans and Canada Student Grants. Most recently, Economic Action Plan 2012 provided $50 million over two years to enable the Strategy to help more young Canadians get the information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to make a successful transition to the workplace.
There are still too many unemployed Canadians looking for work and too many businesses looking for workers. Upon full implementation of the Canada Job Grant, nearly 130,000 Canadians each year are expected to have access to the training they need to fill available jobs.
The Agreements will be reformed to directly connect skills training with employers and jobs for Canadians with the Canada Job Grant—the centrepiece of the new Agreements. Businesses with a plan to train Canadians for an existing job or a better job will be eligible to apply for a Canada Job Grant. Canadians seeking training can, in partnership with an employer, benefit from the Canada Job Grant. In its report released in January 2013, entitled Rethinking DisAbility in the Private Sector, the Panel estimates that approximately 800,000 working-age Canadians whose disability does not prevent them from working are not doing so.
The Government is committed to working with provincial and territorial governments, employers and disability organizations to connect Canadians with available jobs. The reformed Agreements will be designed to better meet the employment needs of Canadian businesses and improve the employment prospects for persons with disabilities, in keeping with transformed Labour Market Agreements, and will put stronger accountability regimes in place. Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes to provide a temporary investment to support the creation of the Canadian Employers Disability Forum, as recommended by the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities. Good choices early on can help to ensure that young Canadians obtain the skills and experience necessary to find work quickly, avoid unnecessary debt and get a better start to their careers.
Economic Action Plan 2013 confirms that the Government will renew its support for Pathways to Education Canada. Significant progress has been achieved in helping newcomers access the Canadian job market quickly.
Canada continues to experience major labour and skill shortages in many regions, and Canadians who are seeking jobs should always be first in line for these opportunities. These individuals play an important role in fostering Canadian economic development through tourism, trade, commerce, and educational and research activities. A study commissioned by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade noted that in 2010, international students in Canada spent in excess of $7.7 billion on tuition, accommodation and discretionary spending.
An increasing demand will be seen for the economic sector of this industry – analysts who know this industry and can then work in businesses to consult and advise on the direction of this industry. By 2020, nearly 9,000 nurses with a median wage of $72,000 will be retiring annually, as the demands of an aging population become more acute.
Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and newcomers are important segments of the Canadian population that are underrepresented in the labour force. The skills training system must be better attuned to helping Canadians acquire the skills that will get them hired or will help them get better jobs.
The Government will also renegotiate the Labour Market Development Agreements to reorient training toward labour market demand. The program will also be reformed to provide more demand-driven training solutions for persons with disabilities and make it more responsive to labour market needs. Projects must demonstrate that they respond to labour market demands, develop partnerships and leverage contributions from the private sector. The new Start-Up Visa will attract innovative immigrant entrepreneurs to launch their companies in Canada to help create new jobs and spur economic growth. It will allow for Canadian employers, provinces and territories to select skilled immigrants from a pool of applicants that best meet Canada’s economic needs.
International students and researchers bring needed skills and experience to the Canadian workforce, and can drive innovation and economic growth. To meet growing demand, Economic Action Plan 2013 proposes funding of $42 million over two years, beginning in 2013–14, to support enhanced processing capacity within the Temporary Resident Program.
The changes will also allow successful graduates to integrate into and enhance our skilled workforce, and thereby continue their contribution to Canadian innovation and economic development.
And the best news for job-seekers is that demand for these positions isn’t expected to drop off anytime soon. And while you could argue that the public sector is a risky place to hold down a job, in terms of size it’s been relatively unchanged since the late 1990s, and accounts for about 20% of all employment in Canada.



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