A thriller about a bestselling author who is rescued from a car wreck by his biggest fan…who then holds him hostage until he writes an entire novel just for her. A sci-fi novel about what happens when a town is sealed off from the rest of the world by a mysterious force field.
Originally released as a six part serial novel in 1996, The Green Mile is about a man with extraordinary healing powers and empathy, who has wound up on death row. Some of King’s most famous stories are included in this collection of four novellas, which form the basis for the films Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption and Apt Pupil.
Another sci-fi story, this time-travel tale is about an English teacher who is shown a rift in time that will take him back to 1958.
While this novel is positioned in the middle of the Dark Tower saga, it’s actually more of a prequel, with the events taking place many years before. Stephen King has said in interviews that of everything he’s written, this novel is his favourite. Matt Kearns, linguist, archaeologist and reluctant explorer from Beneath the Dark Ice and Black Mountain returns to help save the world. Alex Hunter, code named Arcadian, wakes up with no knowledge of who he is, in the care of a woman he doesn't recognise, in a country not his own. Hel is generally presented as being rather greedy and indifferent to the concerns of both the living and the dead, but her personality is little-developed in what survives of Old Norse literature.
Tip JarIf you've found this site to be helpful, please consider making a secure PayPal donation via the button below. Astrid Kircherr (left) and her manager, Ulf Kruger, pose at a Beatlemania exhibition opening in Hamburg, Germany in 2009.
In the gathering dusk of a warm, humid summer Friday evening in northern Indiana, small groups of Amish-born girls between the ages of sixteen and nineteen walk along straight country lanes that border flat fields of high cornstalks and alfalfa, dotted here and there with neat, drab houses set back from the roads. Supernatural star Misha Collins has been busy job-hunting for presidential candidate Donald Trump — and he took the search a step further Wednesday by creating a LinkedIn profile for him. The mock profile probably wouldn’t garner too much interest though: “I was born rich!” faux-Trump boasts in the profile’s summary.
The rest of the profile follows a similar pattern, pointing out Trump’s wealth (as well as “skills” including “saying ‘You’re fired’?” and “denying accusations”).
Though the LinkedIn profile has been taken down, you can still catch most of it over at BeKnown. Quite often people don’t like the horror content, the violence, or just the rambling, overly-descriptive style of some of his works.
King has always written the perspective of children well, and he takes it to a new level here.
Told from the perspective of a prison supervisor, it explores race and justice in America, and was King’s biggest foray into magical realism. It even contains exercises and ideas for aspiring writers, and is a must-read for anyone who is serious about a career in commercial fiction. They are some of King’s most atypical stories and really demonstrate his skills as a storyteller. Convinced by an older time traveller that he must go back and prevent the assassination of JFK, he starts a new life in the 50s and prepares to wait for the day of Kennedy’s death. Using an empty and desolate America as its setting, The Stand follows a disparate group of survivors who are drawn to either the call of good or the call of evil. He has never failed to capture my attention and he has always delivered in twisting my mind to alternative ways of thought. After reading Desperation and The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon and loving them I decided to read every Stephen king book. But Snorri can’t be taken at face value, and this family tree is likely something he himself invented in the interest of making Norse mythology seem more neat and tidy than it actually was.
While this site provides the ultimate online introduction to the topic, my book The Viking Spirit provides the ultimate introduction to Norse mythology and religion period. The book 'Astrid Kirchherr: A Retrospective' was published this week and examines Kirchherr's photographs she took both before and after working with The Beatles. One pair of girls walks westward, another pair eastward toward the destination; a threesome travels due south.
Not only is Trisha dealing with the practical elements of survival, but increasing hallucinations and the emotional trauma of her parents’ divorce.
A large cast of characters, an intriguing mystery and a struggle for control of the town combine to make a fast paced and thrilling read. As I mentioned in the introduction, King really is a master at what he does, and his insights into how fiction works are fascinating.
Not only does he have to adjust to his new life in the past, and deal with the personal relationships that arise, but he also decides to keep an eye on Lee Harvey Oswald. I’ve also written a popular list of The 10 Best Norse Mythology Books, which you’ll probably find helpful in your pursuit. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. As part of the massive Dark Tower saga it adds depth to the character of Roland, and fleshes out the world a lot more.
Ultimately this is King’s most blatant love story that explores a connection between people that can outlast death.
For most, this means a tentative foray — a trip to the local movie theater, or driving lessons. Though they are used to exercise and walking strongly, their demeanor is demure, so that they appear younger than non-Amish girls of the same age.
The walkers pass homes where the women and children in the yards, taking in the last of the wash off clotheslines, wear no shoes, as though to better sense the warm air, grass, and dirt between their toes.


And Kirchherr has often been credited with convincing the band to adopt those iconic mop-tops. Along these country lanes, while there are a few homes belonging to the "English," the non-Amish, most are owned by Old Order Amish families. But Sutcliffe died of a brain hemorrhage in 1962, and in 1964 Kirchherr accompanied her photographer friend Max Scheler to London to shoot behind-the-scenes photographs on the film A Hard Day's Night — and to capture the now internationally famous Beatles in their hometown of Liverpool. No music can be heard coming from the Amish houses as the girls walk past, no faint whisper of broadcast news, no whir of air conditioners.
All that disturbs the calm is the occasional animal bark, whinny, snort, or trill, and every few minutes the rapid clop-clop-clop of a horse-drawn vehicle going past; the girls' peals of laughter sound as innocent, as timeless, and as much a part of the natural surround as birds' calls. There they go upstairs to the bedroom shared by the young females of the family, to huddle and giggle in anticipation of what is to happen later that night, after full dark. In a window visible from the lane, they position a lit gas lamp, and they leave open an adjacent side door to the house and stairway. These are signals to male Amish youth out "cruising" that there are young ladies inside who would welcome a visit, and who might agree to go out courting-a part of the rumspringa, or "running-around," tradition that has been passed down in Amishdom for many generations.
Shipshe, as the locals call their town, has only a few streets but these are lined with nearly a hundred attractive "specialty" shops that sell merchandise as likely to have been manufactured in China as crafted in Indiana.
The young ladies gathered in that upstairs bedroom, waiting for young men to come calling, work in Shipshe, Middlebury, Goshen, and other neighboring towns as waitresses, dishwashers, store clerks, seamstresses, bakers, and child-minders. All have been employed since graduating from Amish schools at age fourteen or fifteen, or leaving public schools after the eighth grade, and have been dutifully turning over most of their wages to their families to assist with household expenses.
After their full days at work, and before leaving their homes this evening, the young ladies have also performed their chores: feeding the cows they milked earlier in the day, providing fresh bedding for the horses, assisting with housecleaning and laundry, with the preparation, serving, and clearing away of the evening meal, and caring for dozens of younger siblings.
The battered, secondhand autos and pickups are parked well off the road, to be less visible to passersby in horse-drawn buggies. Out of the vehicles clamber males from sixteen to their early twenties, most of them Amish-born but at this moment trying hard not to appear Amish, wearing T-shirts and jeans, some with long hair or crew cuts instead of Amish bowl cuts. The young Amish-raised men have day jobs in carpentry shops, in factories that make recreational vehicles and mobile homes, in construction, or at the animal auction and flea market in town; none are farmers, though most still live at home, some on farms and the rest on "farmettes," five- to ten-acre homesteads that have a vegetable garden and areas of pasturage for the horses and the occasional family cow.
After introductory banter in the crowded room, the girls are invited to go with the boys, and they all troop back out to the cars, the Amish girls still in their traditional garb.
A few words pass between the daughter of the house and her parents-who have not, after all, been asleep-but while these include admonitions to be careful, they do not specify that she is to come home at a particular hour. While riding along, each Amish girl performs at least one of many actions that have been forbidden to her throughout her childhood: lights up a cigarette, grabs a beer, switches on the rock and rap music on the car radio or CD player, converses loudly and in a flirtatious manner with members of the opposite sex. In addition to vehicle parking spaces, the station has a hitching post for horses and buggies.
What these Amish teenagers seek on this visit is the convenience storea€™s bathrooms, located next to a side door. In a bunch, the girls head into them, occupying for a while both the Gentsa€™ and the Ladiesa€™ as their male companions stand guard and graze the aisles, the older ones buying beer for them all, the younger ones springing for jerky, chips, and nuts. There are no sexually explicit magazines here at which the boys might glance, because such magazines are not carried in local stores, in deference to the wishes of the Amish and Mennonites in the area.
A few young males shove quarters into a gambling machine, the Pot O Silver, which has the potential of returning them five or ten dollars for every half-dollar they put in.
They wear jeans, T-shirts, and other mainstream American teenager outfits, some revealing their navels. Hair coverings have been removed, and a few have also let down their hair, uncut since childhood. The counter clerk, an older woman in Mennonite garb, seems unabashed by the changes in attire.
A used-car-lot inventory of cars, trucks, buggies, bicycles, and motorcycles is already parked here. Young, mechanically adept men hook up portable CD players and boom-box speakers to car batteries. Its bright light and stark shadows crosshatch partygoers at the edges of the center, where various transactions are occurring. Most of the Amish youth are from northern Indiana, but some have come from across the state line in Michigan or from many hours away in Missouri and Ohio. There are about four hundred youth at this almost-deserted site, out of about two thousand adolescent Amish in northern Indiana. Some of the kids are what others refer to as "simmies," literally, foolish in the head, young, naive, new to rumspringa — and, most of them, willing to work hard to lose the label quickly.
Some of the younger kids do not know the potency of what they are drinking, or what it might do to them. Most guzzle to mimic the others, while gossiping about who is not there or is not drinking. A handful of the partygoers are seriously addicted, while others are trying drugs for the first time. Crank is incredibly and instantly addictive, and it is relatively simple and cheap to make; the only ingredient used that is not available from a local hardware store, anhydrous ammonia, is a gaseous fertilizer easily stolen from tanks on farms. Those few partygoers interested in doing hard drugs gather in a different location than the majority, who prefer drinking beer or smoking pot. Others shout in Pennsylvania Dutch and in English about how much it will cost to travel to and attend an Indianapolis rock concert, and the possibilities of having a navel pierced or hair cut buzz short. One bunch of teens dances to music videos shown on a laptop computer; a small group of guys, near a barn, distributes condoms.
Another countered that it is because the Amish guys have more money in their pockets — the result of not having to spend much on food and shelter, since most of them are living at home. The English guys are also partial to the Amish young ladies, this young man added, because Amish girls are "more willing than English girls to get drunk." Of temptation-filled parties like this, one Amish young woman will later comment, "God talks to me in one ear, Satan in the other.


Part of me wants to be Amish like my parents, but the other part wants the jeans, the haircut, to do what I want to do." Couples form and head off into the darkness. Some petting goes further than exploration, and this night one of the girls who earlier walked that country lane loses her virginity.
Another partygoer becomes pregnant; several weeks from now, when she realizes it, she will simply advance her wedding date so that her child, as with about 12 percent of first births among the Amish, will be born before her marriage is nine months old. This evening, as well, a few female partygoers will bring boys home, and, with their parents' cognizance, spend the night in "bed courtship," on the girls' beds but "bundled" separately. There are fistfights; one partygoer recalled a particularly bad incident in which a lad in a fit of bloody rage ripped the earring stud from another young man's ear.
One farmer's daughter, spotting a partygoer about to throw up, smilingly hands her an empty pail. Some have made plans to go to a mall, twenty miles away, to shop and see a movie before continuing the party tomorrow evening in another semideserted location. Most have no plans to tell their parents, upon returning to the family hearth, precisely where they have been for the previous forty-eight hours, or with whom they spent their "going away" time. While the parents may well ask such questions, the children feel little obligation to answer them. The rumspringa period begins when an Amish youth turns sixteen; at that age, since the youth has not yet been baptized, he or she is not subject to the church's rules about permitted and forbidden behaviors. Nearly all continue to live with their families, however, and many, maybe even a majority, do not go to the parties or otherwise engage in behaviors that Amish parents and church officials consider wild.
An individual's rumspringa ends when he or she agrees to be baptized into the church and to take up the responsibilities attendant on being an adult member of the Amish community. Interviews with youth going through rumspringa, and with their parents and others in the Amish community concerned with their rumspringa activities, constitute the bulk of its pages. Considering that the Amish make up a very small percentage of the country's population, and that not even all Amish teenagers take part in rumspringa activities, the question arises: What makes rumspringa of interest to readers who are not Amish? They share with the majority, and with this author, a common heritage: they are of "white" European stock, they embrace the Judeo-Christian ethos, and they come from families that have been in the United States for more than one generation. Also relevant are the ways in which the Amish differ from the majority, namely, in practicing an intense Christian religiosity that suffuses their daily lives, in deliberately attempting to live separately from the larger society, and in refusing to adopt precisely those practices and products of our mainstream society that have come to define and represent America and Americans to the rest of the world — our cars, our entertainment, our consumerism. This combination of shared heritage and deep cultural differences makes the Amish a particularly significant mirror for the rest of us.
Some of us pay more attention to those roots and text, others less, but they are always there, affecting who we are, what we do, and how we do it. As for mirrors held up by other minority groups, the majority is often able to dismiss the relevance to itself of the ways of life, behaviors, and critiques of American society that come from Asian Buddhists or Arab Muslims on the grounds that their backgrounds, cultures, and practices have so few similarities to the abovementioned majority. As do most parents, I find it important to listen very carefully to children when they are going through stressful events and periodsa€”which is why this book takes a documentary approach to the lives of Amish youngsters in rumspringa, quoting them at length, and why it also delves into the activities of their parents and community members in regard to rumspringa. The more complex society becomes, the more perplexing, troubling, and problematic their role appears to be," writes S.
Adolescence is a journey from childhood to adulthood, and Amish adolescents, as do most Americans of that age, experience joys, ills, temptations, and challenges during their journeys, and face dangers that are far from trivial — addictions, sexually transmitted diseases, criminality, and the failures that may stem from inadequately preparing for assumption of the responsibilities of adult life.
First, they arrive at adolescence after childhoods that are far more sheltered (and structured) than those of our own children, and, second, Amish teens begin the rumspringa journey carrying weighty baggage consisting of the moral imperatives, biblical precepts, and complex sets of rules that the sect has imparted to them in their homes, at church, and in school. In addition to experiencing these sensations, Amish youth are roiled by powerful emotional currents specific to their situation.
All of a sudden you could do something — you could breathe!" Able at last to indulge their curiosity about the world, they do so, to frissons of endangerment and empowerment.
Other Anabaptists, such as the more numerous Mennonites, do not have a rumspringa period, although, like the Amish, Mennonites insist that their young people come to the church through a freely chosen, informed, and adult baptismal decision. The community's expectation is that, upon completion of the courtship task, a young Amish couple will end their rumspringa by agreeing to marry and concurrently make the commitment to be baptized — to "join church," in their idiom. The further expectation is that after marriage the pair will settle down, engage in no more experimental behaviors, and live fully Amish lives, under the direction of the church. For if the unbaptized children who venture into the world at sixteen do not later return to the fold in sufficient numbers, the sect will dwindle and die out. The threat is that these children, once let loose, may never return; but that gamble must be chanced by the community because its members sense that the threat of not permitting the children a rumspringa is even greater. Absent a rumspringa process, there would be a higher probability of loss, of many more Amish youth succumbing to the lure of the forbidden, perhaps even after marriage and baptism, with resultant defections from the sect and havoc within it. The Amish count on the rumspringa process to inoculate youth against the strong pull of the forbidden by dosing them with the vaccine of a little worldly experience. Their gamble is also based on the notion that there is no firmer adhesive bond to a faith and way of life than a bond freely chosen, in this case chosen after rumspringa and having sampled some of the available alternative ways of living. Meyers, a sociology professor at Goshen College, more than 80 percent of Amish youth do eventually become Amish church members. When on the loose, did they master the emotional and intellectual tools needed to survive in that world before deciding to give up on it?
While earlier generations of Amish spent their entire lives on farms, having little interchange with the non-Amish world, today more than 70 percent of male adults do not farm, and if current trends persist, an even larger percentage of their children will spend their lives in nonfarm occupations.
The concern among Amish elders is that this nonfarm home and work environment will overexpose the next generation of Amish to the "English" world, and that even if they return to the church after rumspringa, their altered outlooks may eventually compromise the church's ability to sustain itself.



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