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03.02.2014

Using cross trainers for running,workout clothing and accessories,outdoor fitness equipment perth,trainers-sale.uk.com reviews - Plans Download

If weight loss is one of your goals this year then you’re going to need some kind of exercise program.
Elliptical cross trainers are by far the best piece of equipment you can purchase to get a complete total body impact-free aerobic workout. While you can find an elliptical trainer for less than $500 in my opinion their only suitable as a coat rack.
Elliptical cross trainers first came out in the early 1990s, so for there have been three designs for this type of exercise equipment. What’s great about a center drive elliptical cross trainer is that on most models the petals are closer together for a much more normal stride, generally they make a much more stable platform to work out on, overall they take up less room, and if you buy a halfway decent one they have a much smoother stride and then the front or rear drive. Whichever kind you buy whether you’re doing this as part of your weight loss program or just as a way to work off stress, the cross trainer is a must for any home gym.
Using one of these types of exercise equipment is comparable calorie-burning wise to using a treadmill, what makes the cross trainer different than your workout on a treadmill is first with a treadmill you have impacts on your joints.
Another great benefit of the cross trainer is that if you adjust your stride to make it longer you will burn more calories without seeming too put any more effort into your workout, and that’s an added plus for any weight loss program or exercise routine. An elliptical cross trainer is what is called a weight bearing exercise, what that means is that your bones are working against gravity to support your weight.
Walking, jogging, running, and weightlifting all of these things are a weight bearing exercise, anytime you put your weight on your joints that is a weight bearing exercise. Most of the cross trainers they manufacture now have both forward and reverse motions on the petals, the forward motion targets the quadriceps while the backward motion targets the hamstrings.
Remember as I mentioned above to check and make sure that the cross trainer you might be interested in has an adjustable stride length.
Although there are many different types of cross trainers, most include a wide range of pre-set workout programs for both forward and reverse action. Some have the heart rate monitor built into the handles while others use a chest strap, either way works but this is very important to get the maximum results from your daily workout routines. In the coming weeks I will be reviewing the better built elliptical cross trainers that have front, rear, and middle drives. Whichever one you ultimately decide on, its always a good idea to go and try it out before you buy to make sure that it is the right fit for you. You can probably get a much better deal online, and there’s definitely something to be said for having it delivered to your front door without you having to strap it to the top of your car.
But trying it first will make sure that your investment is going to be something that will pay dividends for your health and your weight loss goals and won’t end up stuffed in a corner and used as a coat rack.
This entry was posted in Equiptment For Weight loss and tagged elliptical cross trainer, Health, home gym, Weight Loss. I used to work as a service engineer for a major sports company, so I know a lot about the mechanics of cross trainers, treadmills, rowing machines and other types of fitness equipment.
If you’re looking for gym quality, the Technogym Synchro Forma doesn’t disappoint, as you’d expect at that price point. The Synchro is a great machine, and the only thing that might pose a problem is the price, which is quite steep for a home elliptical. The Horizon Syros is from the low end of the price scale in the Horizon elliptical range and is a very good choice if you’re looking for a crosstrainer for the home on a budget. This is a compact machine, measuring just 145cm long by 60cm wide, which will certainly help if you want to save on space. One thing to mention though is that, being a compact elliptical, it does mean there’s a shorter stride length, which may feel slightly inhibitive to the taller user.
The oversized foot pads are a nice touch, providing you with more space to find the most comfortable position for you. An elliptical at the budget end of the price scale, I wouldn’t expect the Horizon Syros to offer a massive array of innovation. This trainer comes with good warranty – 3 years parts and labour, which is a good selling point. Renowned for innovation, Nordic Track fitness equipment always has much to offer on the features front, and the E4.2 elliptical is no different. I found the machine offered a really smooth action too, making this very comfortable indeed.
For the space conscious, this elliptical comes in at a very reasonable 133cm length and although not foldable, can be moved pretty easily with the transport wheels. The only slight quibble is that the stride pattern has been designed to cater for both a flat and an incline position so when the incline is not raised there is more of a vertical bounce than you will find on the comparable models in this class like the Kettler Elyx 1 or the Vision X1500 although neither of those models can hold a candle to the E7.2 when it comes to console features. For the space conscious, this elliptical comes in at a very reasonable 175cm length and although not foldable, can be moved pretty easily with the aid of the rear handle and transport wheels. Not quite the level of build quality you would find on the alternative models in this class. The stride length is 20.5 inches and the pedals are spaced at less than 2 inches which will suit almost everyone, with only very tall users over 193cm perhaps finding it a little on the short side. The upper body moving arms are also well positioned to allow maximum engagement of the core muscles and ensure users retain good posture when working out.  The console is well laid out and easy to read with all the essential workout feedback displayed.
GluteKicker and Arm Blaster are two other program variants unique to Octane to focus on upper or lower body accordingly.  Hear rate monitoring is available via the contact grips on the static handles although use of a telemetric wireless strap is excluded as the console has no polar chip.
In summary then, if you are looking for a cross trainer with the best ergonomics and the most natural movement the Q35C is better than any other cross trainer out there for this sort of money. Usually synonymous with quality German engineering, Kettler’s new Axos range is manufactured in the Far East to keep costs down so what can we expect?  Firstly, this is a compact machine, measuring just 150cm long by 68cm wide which will suit the space conscious consumer but, like the majority of compact ellipticals, the stride length is compromised as a result.  At 16 inches and supplied with a rear drive flywheel, the Axos has that traditional, slightly up and down, step like quality to the movement which may feel a little inhibitive for taller users.
The console has a monochrome LCD display with a continuous display of feedback, including time, speed, distance, RPM, calories and heart rate.  There are 12 workout programs including a heart rate control option with an audible alarm when maximum pulse rate is exceeded. There is nothing too spectacular but plenty of options available to maintain good variety and hand pulse grips on the static handlebars come as standard.  So, although the Axos doesn’t compare in terms of engineering quality to the German made offerings from Kettler like the Unix P or Elyx series, you wouldn’t expect them to at this price and Kettler still have no qualms about offering their standard 3 year parts and labour warranty. In summary then, at under ?300 the Axos is better than the alternatives in terms of both resistance and build quality.  The biomechanics won’t suit everyone and I would certainly recommend you try before you buy but this is certainly one to seriously consider for those on a budget. The E4000i Premier cross trainer is a top end cross trainer from the Horizon range.  Designed as a front flywheel machine, it combines a pivoting footplate system which replicates the body’s natural foot movement to minimise stress on the joints. Also, because the flywheel is at the front, the pedal spacing is much closer together with just 1.2 inches between them which improves biomechanical alignment to allow users to concentrate on putting effort into the workout without causing the knees to invert which can sometimes be the case with some rear drive elliptical models. The stride length ranges from 20 – 22 inches when the incline setting is increased to maximum.  This position extends the range of movement to provide an additional workout for more muscle groups. The incline motor itself is controlled easily at the touch of a button either manually to a level of choice or via one of two different incline programs. Because of the long stride and the front drive flywheel, the E4000i will suit pretty much anyone in terms of comfort, although the increased range of upper body movement to compensate for the incline may cause some shorter users to stretch excessively when using the incline at its maximum setting. You will need a fair amount of space to accommodate this machine too, as it stands at 175cm long and 65cm wide and cannot be folded for storage so it would look quite imposing in a smaller room. A 136kg (21 stone) user weight makes this a substantial machine but then it does weigh in at 108kg and although there are transportation wheels it isn’t particularly portable.  As is the case with Horizon products, build quality is very good and backed up with their 5 year parts and labour on site warranty with a lifetime frame and motor warranty to boot. In summary then, if you are looking for an elliptical with extra variety of workouts or you want to work on specific muscle groups then the E4000i is a lot of elliptical for your money. The Life Fitness brand is well known throughout the world due to its prominence in gyms and health clubs. The track console also includes a virtual trainer facility which allows users to create workouts, track results and progress online and then connect to the console directly via USB or by using the rather innovative Life Fitness virtual trainer App.


This is no small unit at just over 2 metres long (206cm L x 76cm W) and the stride length is substantial as a result. It feels solid and very well made and the maximum user weight of 158kg (29 stone) reflects this. None really, although the price point means that the X1 will only be an option for those with a reasonable budget and space to match.
In summary then, a quality elliptical that looks and feels every bit a prestige piece of fitness equipment. The Kettler Unix P is the latest edition to the Kettler compact elliptical range.  Kettler have long been synonymous with great build quality which stems from German engineering resulting in very solid, reliable fitness products.
The Unix P is a compact unit at just 144cm long and 56cm wide, with a fairly standard 16 inch stride pattern for a small elliptical.  A 20kg flywheel with a magnetic, electronically controlled braking system offers huge levels of resistance but the stride still feels a bit short despite the smoothness of the movement. The maximum user weight capacity of 150kg (23.5 stone) is substantial for a small machine and the whole product feels very well engineered which isn’t surprising as it is made in Germany.
Brands like Horizon Fitness, Vision Fitness and Bremshey are all now offering 18 to 20 inch stride front drive ellipticals at this level price wise. In summary then, if you are willing to accept the limitations of the Unix P as a trade off against great build quality and reliability, have a limited space but a not so limited budget then this could be the right choice of cross trainer for you. For the most part, choosing a more compact cross trainer like the NordicTrack E9 ZL means compromising on the stride length. This is a pretty substantial machine weighing in at 68kg with a maximum user weight to match, (150kg or 23.5 stone). The warranty covers the frame for 5 years and 12 months parts and labour for the remainder although Nordic track will upgrade this to 2 years for free if  the product is registered within 28 days of purchase. In summary then, the E9ZL is a lot of elliptical for your money.  If space and budget are your primary consideration then there aren’t many, if any alternatives at this price that will give you so much specification.
Neither the service provider nor the domain owner maintain any relationship with the advertisers. This smart solution allows the user to customise own fitness program, receive automatic workout downloads, manage online profile and much more! If you only have the money or the room for one piece of equipment then my advice would be to go with an elliptical trainer.
Most elliptical trainers that sell for less than $500 will be unstable during a vigorous workout, they won’t have the features that a more expensive model will have to make your workout routine a more enjoyable experience, and the cheap parts that the company’s are forced to use to build a cheap cross trainer will wear out much more quickly. The first design was what was called rear drive because the wheel or what you would call the drives section was in the rear.
I’m just saying that as they get better with the engineering on these types of exercise equipment if I had a choice I would definitely take a look at some that had a center drive before I made up my mind on which type to buy. When your bones are doing this they respond by adding osteoblasts (bone forming cells) which increases your bone density which is very important to the body us as we get older. Swimming or riding a bike are not weight bearing exercises (although both are good for your health) because your weight is not fighting against gravity. Almost all cross trainers allow you to adjust the intensity of your workouts, the adjustment should work automatically on the petals as well as on the bars so that as you are working out you’re getting a consistent workout on both the upper and lower body at the same time. Pretty much standard on all elliptical trainers are a monitor for displaying distance traveled, calories burned, your speed, your time in workout, and your heart rate. I hope I’ve given you some idea of why if you can only afford or only have room for one piece of equipment the elliptical cross trainer would be a wise investment.
Here you will find independent reviews of the top cross trainer brands & models, from Reebok Fitness, Vision Fitness, Life Fitness, NordicTrack, Kettler, Horizon Fitness and many many more.
Before trying out this offering from Technogym, I was already aware of the influence of this brand, and have used their commercial Excite range of cardio equipment in the gym. The long arms on the machine feel great and I could really feel it in my arms when I cranked up the resistance, of which there are a respectable 12 levels. Navigation is simple and gave me all the information that I want to see in separate windows, such as my speed, distance and calories burned. I’ve been on the Synchro many times now and I haven’t been worried yet that it will fall off, no matter how hard I’m pushing myself.
This allows you to track your progress more effectively and brings you engaging workout options via the Training App. I would recommend getting the Training Link when you buy it, as it does cost more to add it on. Very user friendly, compact and a good build for the money, it’s great for using in the home and is one of the better ellipticals on the market in this price range.
As already mentioned, it does have a slightly shorter stride length than is recommended, but I found its 16” adequate, though slightly uncomfortable when moving more swiftly, so far better for low-impact workouts.
So, if you’re looking for a machine that’s easy to use, not too technical and is affordable, this one comes highly recommended. With a total of 20 challenging resistance levels and iFit SD card compatibility, it’s great for those who want some variety in their workout.
In total, there are 23 workouts – not many offer that much variety – and they all have their benefits, depending on your goals. You can buy different iFit SD cards for under ?20, all offering different workouts, such as weight loss, wellness, etc.
Although many advise that a 20 inch stride is preferable, this elliptical offers 17 inches, which I found very comfortable. Compared to others in this price range, it was definitely superior, so I think you’d be hard pushed to find smoother. Even though it helps to save space, I think it’s best to make an exception with ellipticals, otherwise you do lose out on comfort. As is usually the case with most products from the Nordic range this elliptical is packed with features.  18 inches is the standard stride length, which is adjustable to a maximum of 20 inches via the manually operated incline ramp.
A 9kg flywheel provides challenging amounts of smooth resistance with 20 digitally controlled levels available.
A pretty sturdy product weighing in at 90kg will cope with users up to 150kg maximum and with a 5 year warranty on the frame and 2 years parts and labour on everything else there is no doubting the value for money on offer with this cross trainer. Of all the ellipticals tested, Nordic track always seem to give the most specification and whilst the overall build quality isn’t the greatest, it is a struggle to think of a better crosstrainer at under ?500.
This is because they have focused their attentions on making the workout as natural as possible by mapping to the body’s natural biomechanics. Despite the not inconsiderable stride length this elliptical does not have a large foot print. Program wise there are 10 preset options providing variety and challenge for all levels of fitness.  There is also the X-mode option which has timed random exercise prompts to break up the monotony of a workout and ensure you are pushing yourself. This is a surprising omission on a product at this level and value however   this feature is included on the higher spec Q37ci model. The lack of console features won’t put everyone off as there are enough options for the majority. This is because unlike a lot of cheaper ellipticals, Kettler have incorporated a 14kg flywheel offering 16 levels of electronically controlled resistance. Effectively, the glutes, hamstrings and thighs are all forced to engage more than on a traditional elliptical which may prove popular for hill walker and skiers who tend to utilise these muscles more. Anyone with restricted or reduced ceiling height will also need to be slightly wary as tall users may have concerns about headroom when the incline is on the maximum setting.


20 inches should, broadly speaking cater for the majority of users quite comfortably with only exceptionally tall users (195cm and over) potentially finding the stride a bit short. The warranty is a very respectable onsite 3 years parts and labour, it has quite a contemporary style and is certainly on a par with other prestige brands like Octane Fitness or Precor Fitness in terms of features and specification.
Lots of programs included with a smooth comfortable ride, catering for users of all shapes and sizes. The quality shows but it comes at a price, the Unix P is expensive when compared to alternative models available at the price point. Kettler have themselves recently introduced similar, longer stride pattern models with the Elyx 3,5 and 7. At 17 inches and with a rear drive flywheel system, this elliptical has a traditional, slightly cyclical feel to it.  If your experience of using a cross trainer has been with a rear flywheel model in a gym or health club then this will certainly have a familiar feel to it. Taller users however, may find that the tendency for a rear drive flywheel to tip you forward towards the console, could put pressure on the lower back.
The compromise is that you need to be no more than average height to get the most from this cross trainer. In case of trademark issues please contact the domain owner directly (contact information can be found in whois). The Second design was what was called the front drive, for the same reason because the drive was in the front. Exercising using an elliptical cross trainer is a weight bearing exercise, however the difference is no impact on your joints. The movement is quite unique and felt different from other ellipticals, thanks in part to its ergonomic pedal spacing, which sets them wider apart.
Personally, I can’t stand it when I am trying to keep a steady speed and the screen changes. It was easy to get started – I simply connected my iPad via Bluetooth and I could upload all my results to my online account. If you want your home kit to feel just like the machines in the gym, then this is a great elliptical to invest in. However, although it is light, it still feels pretty solid and is more than capable of taking its recommended user capacity of 136kg.
If you’re not looking to go too fast and are more into resistance, it offers 16 resistance levels, which provides a challenge for all users, whatever your ability.
With 9 programmes, you are able to vary your routine and it comes with really good, customisable display information including calories, body fat and pulse to name just three. I would just suggest taller users try before buying as the 16” stride length may be slightly inhibitive. The focus on innovation doesn’t compromise the overall quality though as it’s a solid elliptical offering a very smooth workout. There are 12 personal trainer programmes, which are great if you need that extra pressure in your ear to get you moving!
At just under 6 feet tall, I’ve always found this stride length to be more than adequate so would only advise you to perhaps look for longer if you’re of exceptional height. The incline ramp has 5 setting positions to a maximum of 20 degrees, enabling users to vary the stride path and work a different set of muscles adding real variety to the type of workouts available.
The console has a well lit blue LCD Grafixx display with feedback and program profiles easily identified.
This enables users to concentrate more on putting effort into resistance levels rather than having to overcome the more usual bouncing stride of most other cross trainers. At just 66cm wide by 166cm long the Q35c would be considered compact in comparison to the alternatives at this price point in the market and this is due to Octane’s patented Quadlink drive mechanism.
The whole machine feels substantial and is backed by a 5 year parts and 2 year labour warranty. Its compact size and bombproof build quality will also appeal to many although the premium price may not as much.
It’s well made and smooth to use but is ultimately a 16 inch stride compact cross trainer and there isn’t really anything new here when compared to previous models in the Kettler range. Of course, some people will love the reliability and solid branding you get from a Kettler product, backed up with a 3 year parts and labour onsite warranty but with a short stride and unchanged biomechanics, there are only going to be limited purchasers. The balanced 22kg weighted flywheel and the silent magnetic resistance system has a class A certified ergometer rating.  This really makes for a very smooth ride and with 25 levels of resistance, it would be a challenge for even the fittest of users to maintain a workout at the maximum level for extended periods. The pedal spacing is also quite wide at 7 inches which causes the knees to invert slightly, resulting in a movement which increases hip rotation and creates a slight bouncing sensation.  None of this is likely to concern individuals of average height as the stride and huge crank inertia will still give a workout which makes the E9 ZL one of the best performing compact elliptical trainers at the price point.
The latest design is called the center drive, which is because (as I’m sure you have guessed) places the drive section in the middle. Using the machine, it felt incredibly stable and as strong as the one I use in the gym, very unlike some of the other cheaper models I’ve tried.
It felt almost like walking up a hill, which my wife loved when she had a go as she could feel it working the muscles in her backside.
I’ve tried a few manual resistance crosstrainers and they definitely weren’t as smooth as this. It also includes heart rate training, which is a nice extra as crosstrainers at this price usually come with monitoring only. If gadgets are more your thing though, you may want to look at NordicTracks, renowned for their innovation.
I have tried out smaller, but noticed the difference as the stride length just wasn’t long enough. As a front drive model, the pedal spacing is nice and close providing a natural and comfortable riding position for the majority of user heights. One of the reasons they are so good at what they do is because it is the only type of fitness product they make.
The movement is flatter and far more like a running motion which virtually eliminates any heel lift resulting in more leg muscles being used therefore creating a much more efficient workout. It’s a shame that there aren’t quick level keys as I find those useful, especially for when doing intervals, but the resistance does change pretty quickly with handy resistance buttons in the handlebars. Plus, as it allows multiple accounts, my wife could set up her separate training diary too. If you’re a taller user though, you may want to look for a longer stride length to provide greater comfort.
You may also be interested to know that it also includes 24 treadmill and exercise bike workouts too, so you could use on the NordicTrack GX3.2 Upright Cycle, for example.
What I really liked was all the feedback for your workout clearly displayed on the console. Listening to the certified personal trainer, I was talked through my workout from start to end. The E4.2 was the largest I could find that fits nicely in my home gym – not taking up too much space but also not compromising on user experience.



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Comments to Using cross trainers for running

  1. jesica_sweet — 03.02.2014 at 10:43:24 Going to snap is not elliptical/cross trainer sounds using cross trainers for running great to commence resistance on your bike or pedal.
  2. 125 — 03.02.2014 at 23:23:39 House gym brands like Life.