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Terrier dog breeds personality,puppy sale in seattle,dog barking at me in dream - Plans On 2016

Category: Dog Training Courses Online | Author: admin 08.06.2014
Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. Contrary to popular belief, small size doesn't necessarily an apartment dog make — plenty of small dogs are too high-energy and yappy for life in a high-rise. Some dogs are simply easier than others: they take to training better and are fairly easygoing.
Some dogs will let a stern reprimand roll off their backs, while others take even a dirty look to heart. Some breeds bond very closely with their family and are more prone to worry or even panic when left alone by their owner. Breeds with very short coats and little or no undercoat or body fat, such as Greyhounds, are vulnerable to the cold.
Being gentle with children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a blase attitude toward running, screaming children are all traits that make a kid-friendly dog. Friendliness toward dogs and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things. Stranger-friendly dogs will greet guests with a wagging tail and a nuzzle; others are shy, indifferent, or even aggressive. If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house. Drool-prone dogs may drape ropes of slobber on your arm and leave big, wet spots on your clothes when they come over to say hello.
Some breeds are brush-and-go dogs; others require regular bathing, clipping, and other grooming just to stay clean and healthy.
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems, such as hip dysplasia.
Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if he is compatible with you and your living space. Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt (such as the word "sit"), an action (sitting), and a consequence (getting a treat) very quickly. Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies.
Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite (a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin). Dogs that were bred to hunt, such as terriers, have an inborn desire to chase and sometimes kill other animals.
A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: he strains on the leash (until you train him not to), tries to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps. The Silky Terrier dog breed exemplifies the expression "small dog, big personality." Weighing just eight to 10 pounds when full grown, he's tough and confident, perhaps because of his heritage as a hunter of small prey.
Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. The Silky, as he's often called, is an elegant little dog with a beautiful, silky — hopefully that wasn't a surprise — coat of tan and blue.
Despite the tough attitude, however, the Silky's a loyal dog who loves to be with his family. The Silky Terrier who's exposed to kids beginning in puppyhood can be a good companion for children older than 10, as long as they treat him carefully and kindly. Silkies have a strong prey drive and will chase cats, squirrels, rodents, and sometimes other dogs. Silky Terriers can be good family dogs, but because of their scrappy personality, children should be about 10 years old and up.
Although they're generally friendly, Silkies can be territorial and aggressive toward other dogs if they're not socialized properly. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. HistoryThe Silky Terrier originated in Australia in the 1890s, when breeders crossed imported Yorkshire Terriers with their native Australian Terriers. In 1906, Australian fanciers developed a breed standard — written guidelines for what the breed should look, move, and act like — in Sydney, New South Wales. Like every dog, the Silky needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. HealthSilkys are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents.
Tracheal Collapse: This is often seen in smaller breeds and can be seen occasionally in the Silky Terrier. CareThe Silky Terrier may look like a toy, but he's a real dog who needs exercise and training.
Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. For more on feeding your Silky, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog. Coat Color And GroomingThis breed's coat is beautiful: long and sleek, parted down the back, and hanging five to six inches down. Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
The Silky gets along with other dogs very well so long as he's been raised to be dog-friendly, though there may be occasional bossiness and rivalry for attention or treats. Norfolk Terriers: the most honest dog breed review you'll ever find about Norfolk Terrier temperament, personality, and behavior. Norfolk Terrier Temperament, Personality, Behavior, Traits, and Characteristics, by Michele Welton. True representatives of what a terrier is supposed to be, Norfolk Terriers are full of fire and stubborn assertiveness, yet are also more agreeable and companionable than some other terriers. The Norfolk Terrier can adapt to any home with moderate exercise (brisk walks and active play sessions) and lots of companionship. Norfolk Terriers usually get along (though can be a bit jealous, possessive, and bossy) with other dogs and cats in the family. To the casual eye, the Norfolk Terrier is virtually identical to the Norwich Terrier, with the most obvious difference being ear carriage -- the Norfolk has drop ears and the Norwich has prick ears. It's a unique Vocabulary and Respect Training Program that will make your Norfolk Terrier the smartest, most well-behaved companion you've ever had. Teaches your dog to listen to you, to pay attention to you, and to do whatever you ask him to do. My dog buying guide, Dog Quest: Find The Dog Of Your Dreams, will teach you everything you need to know about finding a healthy Norfolk Terrier puppy. If you'd like to consult with me personally about whether a Norfolk Terrier might be a good dog breed for your family, I offer a Dog Breed Consulting Service. Once you have your Norfolk Terrier home, you need to KEEP him healthy -- or if he's having any current health problems, you need to get him back on the road to good health. My dog health care book, 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy is the book you need. When you're acquiring a Norfolk Terrier PUPPY, you're acquiring potential -- what he one day will be. But when you acquire an adult dog, you're acquiring what he already IS and you can decide whether he is the right dog for you based on that reality.
Developed in England some 200 years ago to hunt foxes, the Jack Russell Terrier, also known as the Parson Russell Terrier, is a lively, independent, and clever little dog. The result was a bold, athletic dog who won hearts with his quickness, intelligence, determination, and intense desire to hunt. If you want a dog who can learn tricks, run an agility or flyball course in seconds flat, play fetch until you drop, and who will make a charming companion when he's not getting into mischief, the Jack Russell may be the dog for you.


If you have the time and patience to devote to him, the Jack Russell has many qualities that make him an ideal family dog. The Jack Russell Terrier, like many terriers, enjoys digging and can make quite a large hole in a short time.
Jack Russell Terriers must have a securely fenced yard to give them room to play and burn off their abundant energy. Aggression toward other dogs can be a serious problem with the Jack Russell Terrier if he's not taught to get along with other canines from an early age.
To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees.
HistoryThe Jack Russell Terrier was developed in southern England during the mid-1800s by Parson John Russell, from whom the breed took its name.
The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America maintains an independent registry and considers the Jack purely a hunting dog, but the Jack Russell Terrier Association of America (JRTCA) sought recognition by the American Kennel Club, which was granted in 2000. Like every dog, Jack Russells need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. HealthJack Russell Terriers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Because some health problems don't appear until a dog reaches full maturity, health clearances aren't issued to dogs younger than 2 years old. The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America doesn't register any dogs with hereditary defects; dogs must pass a specific veterinary exam before being registered.
Always walk your Jack on leash to prevent him from chasing other animals, challenging bigger dogs, or running in front of cars.
For more on feeding your Jack Russell Terrier, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog. Coat Color And GroomingThe Parson Russell Terrier comes in two coat types: smooth and broken. Children And Other PetsJack Russell Terriers are loving and affectionate dogs who can do well in homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Rescue GroupsJack Russell Terriers are sometimes bought without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one, and these dogs often end up in the care of rescue groups, in need of adoption or fostering.
Being quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents, are all good qualities in an apartment dog. Low-sensitivity dogs, also called "easygoing," "tolerant," "resilient," and even "thick-skinned," can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine.
An anxious dog can be very destructive, barking, whining, chewing, and otherwise causing mayhem. Dogs with a low cold tolerance need to live inside in cool climates and should have a jacket or sweater for chilly walks. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off.
Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. You may be surprised by who's on that list: Fierce-looking Boxers are considered good with children, as are American Staffordshire Terriers (aka pit bulls). Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave.
However, no matter what the breed, a dog who was exposed to lots of different types, ages, sizes, and shapes of people as a puppy will respond better to strangers as an adult. However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds: Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally -- produce a snowstorm of loose hair -- some do both, and some shed hardly at all.
If you've got a laid-back attitude toward slobber, fine; but if you're a neatnik, you may want to choose a dog who rates low in the drool department.
Consider whether you have the time and patience for a dog that needs a lot of grooming, or the money to pay someone else to do it.
This doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk.
Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.
When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest.
Beneath the feistiness, however, is a loving companion dog who loves to stick close to his person. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog. The Silky is, after all, a terrier, with a true terrier temperament: scrappy, tenacious, and fond of digging, barking, and chasing.
To save your flowerbeds, either consider another breed, or train your Silky to dig in a specific area.
He's small enough to be considered prey by larger wild animals, terrier enough to dig his way out, and Silky enough to get into mischief. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments. Some of the offspring looked like Yorkies, some looked like Australian Terriers, and others looked like the Silky of today, with a size and coat length that was between the two parent breeds.
In 1955, he became the Australian Silky Terrier (still the official name for the breed in Australia).
Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.
Not all Silkys will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed.
Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. He enjoys daily walks, romping with you in the yard, or trips to a dog park with a special area for small breeds. When you check your dog's ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections.
Given his strong personality, though, he's usually best for families with children older than 10 who know how to handle a dog. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. Like all terriers, the Silky loves to chase small animals, so he may not be suited for homes with cats, rabbits, or other small pets. These sociable dogs like to be with their owners and demand full participation in all activities. Because of this, Norfolk Terriers do need more socialization than some other terriers, so their natural caution doesn't become exaggerated. Being true terriers, they tend to be feisty with strange pets, and trusting them around rabbits or rodents would be foolish. In temperament, some terrier enthusiasts say the Norfolk Terrier has a feistier temperament and is "busier" than the Norwich, but it's really a matter of individual personality. Norfolk Terriers are often more tolerant toward other dogs and cats than many other terriers are, especially dogs and cats who belong to their own family. Norfolk and Norfolk Terriers need extensive exposure to people and to unusual sights and sounds.
Many terriers will not tolerate any nonsense from little life forms whom they consider to be below themselves in importance. Norfolk Terriers can suffer from joint problems, cataracts, epilepsy, skin problems, a degenerative disease of the central nervous system, and more.
Health problems have become so widespread in dogs today that this book is required reading for ANYONE who is thinking of getting a purebred, crossbred, or mixed breed dog.


Raise your dog the right way and you will be helping him live a longer, healthier life while avoiding health problems and unnecessary veterinary expenses. There are plenty of adult Norfolk Terriers who have already proven themselves NOT to have negative characteristics that are "typical" for their breed.
We can thank one of those hard-hunting English parsons for the Jack Russell Terrier, developed to hunt fox in the south of England some 200 years ago.
The Jack Russell Terrier, also called the Parson Russell Terrier, is a favorite among horse owners, dog sports enthusiasts, animal trainers for film and television, and people who simply appreciate his fearless personality, boundless energy, entertaining antics, and portable size. If you can't deal with a dog who will chew, dig, and bark, rocket through the house multiple times daily, chase cats and other small animals with glee and murderous intent, and will always find the loophole in any command you give, he's definitely not the dog for you, no matter how cute and small he is.
It' easier to train a dog to dig in a specific area than it is to break him of a digging habit. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and breeds for sound temperaments. Russell aimed to create a working terrier who would hunt with hounds, bolting foxes from their dens so the hounds could chase them. To differentiate it from the dogs registered by the JRTCA, the American Kennel Club renamed the breed, calling it the Parson Russell Terrier.
Shorty Jacks resemble Corgis or Dachshunds more than the taller, more balanced American Kennel Club-registered Parson Russell Terriers or the dogs registered by the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America or the Jack Russell Terrier Association of America.
Not all Jacks will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. Health clearances prove that a dog's been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth and ears.
Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.
Dogs who are highly sensitive, independent thinking, or assertive may be harder for a first-time owner to manage.
These breeds do best when a family member is home during the day or if you can take the dog to work. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids, and personality. Breed isn't the only factor; dogs who lived with their littermates and mother until at least 6 to 8 weeks of age, and who spent lots of time playing with other dogs during puppyhood, are more likely to have good canine social skills.
If you're a neatnik you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed, or relax your standards.
If you're buying a puppy, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in, so you can ask the breeder about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives. If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure he gets enough exercise, and measure out his daily kibble in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Dogs that like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging.
People unfamiliar with the breed are often surprised to see the small Silky warn off intruders, romp with large dogs, or keep up with their owners on a hike. Seizures are frightening to watch, but the long-term prognosis for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy is generally very good.
And despite his size, another risk is that he may fight with another dog who wanders onto his turf. Silkys are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.
It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog.
Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out.
However, many Norfolk Terriers are still dominant or aggressive toward strange dogs and have strong instincts to chase and seize small fleeing creatures. Many terriers are quick to react to teasing, and even to the normal clumsiness that comes with small children (accidental squeezing of their ears or pulling of whiskers or stepping on their paw).
Parson John Russell, "Jack" to his friends, wanted an efficient hunting dog and decided to design exactly the dog he had in mind. His heritage as a hunting dog makes him an excellent jogging companion once he's full grown.
Do yourself and the dog a favor by considering carefully whether this is the right breed for you. Jacks are strong-willed dogs, and although they respond to positive motivation in the form of praise, play, and food rewards, they'll become stubborn in the face of harsh corrections.
You'll get your best match if you take your dog-owning experience into account as you choose your new pooch.
No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances.
These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility. It's important to take your dog to the vet for proper diagnosis (especially since seizures can have other causes) and treatment.
Crate training at a young age will help your dog accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl.
If you don't see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Silky rescue. Terriers cannot be trusted off-leash -- they are too likely to "take off", oblivious to your frantic shouts, after anything that runs. Norfolk Terriers can be stubborn and dominant (they want to be the boss) and will make you prove that you can make them do things. Many terriers are possessive of their food and toys and will defend these from all comers, including children.
Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period. Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. This can be crippling, although many dogs lead relatively normal lives with this condition.
Friendly toward people, he can be aggressive toward other dogs and any animal that resembles prey, including cats.



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Comments »

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    | milashka_19 — 08.06.2014 at 20:27:54

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    | Ramal — 08.06.2014 at 15:26:29

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    | Gentlemen — 08.06.2014 at 17:25:19