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Newfoundland dog breed characteristics,dog licking behavior problems,how to stop a dog from biting nipping - Reviews

Category: Anxiety Dog Training | Author: admin 17.11.2015
Contrary to popular belief, small size doesn't necessarily an apartment dog make — plenty of small dogs are too high-energy and yappy for life in a high-rise. Some dogs are simply easier than others: they take to training better and are fairly easygoing. Some dogs will let a stern reprimand roll off their backs, while others take even a dirty look to heart. Some breeds bond very closely with their family and are more prone to worry or even panic when left alone by their owner. Breeds with very short coats and little or no undercoat or body fat, such as Greyhounds, are vulnerable to the cold. Being gentle with children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a blase attitude toward running, screaming children are all traits that make a kid-friendly dog.
Friendliness toward dogs and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things.
Stranger-friendly dogs will greet guests with a wagging tail and a nuzzle; others are shy, indifferent, or even aggressive. If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house. Drool-prone dogs may drape ropes of slobber on your arm and leave big, wet spots on your clothes when they come over to say hello. Some breeds are brush-and-go dogs; others require regular bathing, clipping, and other grooming just to stay clean and healthy. Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems, such as hip dysplasia. Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if he is compatible with you and your living space.
Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt (such as the word "sit"), an action (sitting), and a consequence (getting a treat) very quickly. Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite (a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin). Dogs that were bred to hunt, such as terriers, have an inborn desire to chase and sometimes kill other animals. A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: he strains on the leash (until you train him not to), tries to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps.
Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate.
Originating in Newfoundland, Canada, located on the northeastern shore of that country, the Newfoundland, affectionately nicknamed "Newfie," shares a birthplace with the popular Labrador Retriever. Neat freaks need not consider the Newfoundland because his long, heavy coat is a mud-burr-dirt magnet. All dogs have the potential for heroism, but it seems to be a hardwired into this naturally strong swimmer.
Regardless of the purpose of the Newfoundland in your life, be it worker or companion, he will no doubt capture your heart. The Newfoundland thrives in cool climates, though he can adapt to living in warmer climates. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. HistoryThe Newfoundland comes from the Canadian province of the same name and worked alongside the fishermen of the area. There are three theories of how the Newfoundland came to be, though as is the case with most breeds, it's hard to validate. Another school of thought is that Vikings left the dogs when they visited the New World in 1000 A.D.
The third theory is that the Newfoundland is the result of many European breeds cross bred around the 15th and 16th centuries, among them the Pyrenean Sheep Dogs, Mastiffs, and Portuguese Water Dogs.
What is known is that sometime in the late 18th century, Sir Joseph Banks, an English botanist, acquired several Newfoundlands and in 1775 George Cartwright named them. But the existence of the Newfie, as the breed is sometimes called, was in jeopardy until then.
One person who contributed to the Newfoundland's resurgence was Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), who liked to include the Newfoundland in his paintings. But the future of the breed was truly solidified when the Honorable Harold MacPherson (1884-1963), governor of Newfoundland, made the dog his breed of choice.
Like every dog, the Newfoundland needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when young. If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents. Cancer: Symptoms that may indicate canine cancer include abnormal swelling of a sore or bump, sores that do not heal, bleeding from any body opening, and difficulty with breathing or elimination. Gastric Torsion: Commonly called bloat, this is a life-threatening condition that affects large, deep-chested dogs like Newfoundlands, especially if they're fed one large meal a day, eat rapidly, or drink large amounts of water or exercise vigorously after eating. Don't let your Newfoundland puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement or pull a cart until he's at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level.


Keep your Newfoundland in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. For more on feeding your Newfoundland, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.
The Newfoundland coat comes in several colors, including solid black, brown, gray, or Landseer, a white coat with black markings.
Many owners opt to hire a professional groomer to groom their Newfoundland because it's a daunting task.
Brush your Newfoundland's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Trim his nails once every month or so if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems.
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
The Newfoundland is also easygoing and friendly with other pets, including cats and small mammals, as long as he is properly socialized and trained.
He was originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. Being quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents, are all good qualities in an apartment dog. Low-sensitivity dogs, also called "easygoing," "tolerant," "resilient," and even "thick-skinned," can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine.
An anxious dog can be very destructive, barking, whining, chewing, and otherwise causing mayhem. Dogs with a low cold tolerance need to live inside in cool climates and should have a jacket or sweater for chilly walks. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.
Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave. However, no matter what the breed, a dog who was exposed to lots of different types, ages, sizes, and shapes of people as a puppy will respond better to strangers as an adult.
However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds: Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally -- produce a snowstorm of loose hair -- some do both, and some shed hardly at all. If you've got a laid-back attitude toward slobber, fine; but if you're a neatnik, you may want to choose a dog who rates low in the drool department.
Consider whether you have the time and patience for a dog that needs a lot of grooming, or the money to pay someone else to do it. This doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk.
Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often.
Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.
The breeds are similar in character, sharing a desire to please, intelligence, a strong work ethic, friendliness, adaptability and versatility.
There are many accounts of Newfoundlands rescuing people from the cold waters of the Atlantic following a shipwreck or plucking children from icy deep water — just in time. Though mellow, he's not your basic one-bedroom apartment dog and would probably be happier in a more spacious setting.
Look for a shelter dog, a rescue group, or a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments. The first is that the Newfoundland is a cross between the Tibetan Mastiff and the now-extinct American Black Wolf. In the late 1800s, another fan, Professor Albert Heim of Switzerland identified and described the breed. In the 1780s, the breed was almost wiped out because of government-imposed restrictions mandating that Canadian families had to pay taxes on the one dog they were allowed to keep. The breed was first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1879 and the first American Newfoundland champion was titled in 1883. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.
Not all Newfoundlands will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed.
Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but you may not notice any signs of discomfort in a dog with hip dysplasia.


It's thought to be caused by different growth rates of the three bones that make up the dog's elbow, causing joint laxity. Like other giant breeds, the Newfoundland grows very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making him susceptible to bone disorders.
When you check your dog's ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. Dogs who are highly sensitive, independent thinking, or assertive may be harder for a first-time owner to manage. These breeds do best when a family member is home during the day or if you can take the dog to work. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids, and personality. Breed isn't the only factor; dogs who lived with their littermates and mother until at least 6 to 8 weeks of age, and who spent lots of time playing with other dogs during puppyhood, are more likely to have good canine social skills. If you're a neatnik you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed, or relax your standards. If you're buying a puppy, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in, so you can ask the breeder about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives.
If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure he gets enough exercise, and measure out his daily kibble in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.
Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Dogs that like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Training should begin early because the breed gets big quickly and it can be tough to haul a 100-pound pooch off the couch. Breeding dogs should be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist to be certified as free of hereditary eye disease before they're bred. Seizures are frightening to watch, but the long-term prognosis for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy is generally very good.
The dog is unable to belch or vomit to rid himself of the excess air in his stomach, and blood flow to the heart is impeded. Swimming is an ideal form of exercise for a Newfoundland puppy because he works his muscles without the danger of injuring his joints. Leash training is a must with the Newfoundland, especially because he's going to weigh more than 100 pounds when he's full grown. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. If you don't see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Newfoundland rescue. You'll get your best match if you take your dog-owning experience into account as you choose your new pooch.
No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances.
These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility.
More severe signs occur when a dog is stressed or when potassium levels get high enough to interfere with heart function, causing severe shock and death.
The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl. Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period.
Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.
If you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems. Suspect bloat if your dog has a distended abdomen, is drooling excessively, and retching without throwing up.



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