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How do you stop a dog from biting your feet,how do i stop my puppy from chewing on me,dog safety gates - Downloads 2016

Category: Dog Trainer Certification Programs | Author: admin 20.03.2015
Being able to differentiate between play and aggression is essential to keeping your hands safe around a dog's mouth. Once you are sure that your dog's health is good and her behavior is play related, you can begin taking steps to decrease the mouthing.
If you or members of your family are in physical danger or are fearful of the puppy, seek the help of an experienced Certified Dog Trainer or Applied Animal Behaviorist immediately. In more extreme cases of correction, an adult dog will jump on a puppy and pin it down on its back to really teach her a lesson; in most cases, this should not be replicated by human owners unless under direction and supervision of an experienced trainer. Due to this natural progression, puppies generally learn from adult dogs that biting is unacceptable before they are old enough to cause harm to other dogs or people.
If you have children, it is important that the puppy understands not to bite them, but it may not be appropriate for the children to participate in the training. If you are clicker training the puppy, click as soon as he withdraws her mouth from your hand or lets up the pressure.
Consider enrolling your puppy in a puppy training class, where your dog can learn essential skills while having fun.
Spray the taste deterrent on your body and clothes (if it is fabric-safe) for at least two weeks. If you are contemplating this sort of retaliation, you should contact a professional dog trainer or veterinary behaviorist for assistance. If your puppy seems unsure about the chew toy, try putting a little tuna juice or peanut butter on it to make it more enticing.
Small breed dogs can inflict damaging bites as well; do not neglect to train your small breed puppy just because she will always be small. This version of How to Get Your Puppy to Stop Biting was reviewed by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS on April 13, 2015. Meet Grahamster, a student from Ohio who has been on wikiHow for over 5 years and has written 83 articles. Nipping and biting can be aggressive or non-aggressive, and it can be hard to tell the difference. Indeed, nipping and mouthing are natural, usually non-aggressive behaviors that dogs use to communicate during play and normal interaction with other pets and people. Everyone knows what nipping and biting looks like, but it can be difficult to tell the difference between nonaggressive and aggressive nipping and mouthing. However, an aggressive dog often has a stiff body, a wrinkled muzzle, erect ears, tense facial muscles, and possibly exposed teeth. Dogs can also learn bite inhibition from people: First, play with your dog, letting him or her nip and mouth your hands. If your dog nips or mouths while being petted or scratched, feed your dog small treats from your free hand to accustom him to being touched without being able to nip or mouth. Read an interview with Doggone Safe president Joan Orr with advice for parents about choosing a dog and fostering a safe bond between dog and children.
Do not to approach dogs that are not their own, even if the dog is on leash with its handler. Ensure that when a child visits a house with a dog, that the dog will not be unsupervised with the children.
Teach your child to "be a tree" when confronted with an unknown, overly friendly or hostile dog. Teach your child to "be a rock" if the dog actually jumps on them and knocks them down (curl up and protect face and neck with hands and arms). A safe dog is one that is panting, face happy looking and wagging his tail enthusiastically. A dog about to bite may be growling, showing his teeth, raising fur along his back or holding his tail high in the air (he may even be wagging it). Teach children to play safe games such as fetch that do not involve running or rough play and to play only with their own dog.
Sometimes it is difficult for children to understand that the family dog may not always welcome their attention. When you are home at night watching TV or reading a bedtime story you might like to sit on your Mom or Dad's knee or have them whisper "I love you" in your ear.
A dog may indicate that it wants to be left alone by leaving the room, showing a half moon eye (see below), yawning or licking its chops when the kids are bothering it for weeks, months or even years before finally getting to the point that it feels it has no choice but to bite. You may not care about maintaining a good relationship with a dog, you just want to keep yourself and your kids safe. If your child is going to visit at a playmate's house, ask if they have a dog and whether the dog will be confined when your child visits. If her body and face look rigid and tense, she's growling or showing her teeth, the hair on her back is standing up or if the biting is fast and intense, her behavior may be motivated by aggression rather than play.
Consult with your veterinarian about any possible health-related issues that may be causing the mouthing behavior and deal with those immediately.


You are looking for an alternative behavior that your dog can be rewarded for performing in place of the mouthing. Allowing puppy biting to go unchecked can lead to behavioral problems in adult dogs; a cute nip in a 10-pound new puppy can turn into a serious bite in an 80-pound adolescent dog. Young puppies often do not know how hard they are biting, and so they bite playfully without understanding how it affects others.
Adult dogs tolerate the (sometimes naughty) behavior of young puppies reasonably well, but they become less tolerant as the puppy ages. When selecting a training technique for your puppy, keep in mind the amount of time you are able to spend on the training and the appropriateness of the training method for your situation. Jerking your hands back in pain, while certainly a natural response, may actually encourage your puppy to play harder and continue biting. If she starts to bite again, let out your yelp or stern rebuke and withdraw from playing again. When your puppy bites you, yelp loudly and remove your hand to signal that playing has stopped.
If you begin communicating that hard bites are unacceptable, your puppy may try giving softer bites. Take out a toy or bone and let her bite on it.[5] This will teach her that her teeth belong on a toy or bone instead of on your skin. Playing rough with your hands is plenty fun, but it might be giving your puppy the wrong idea.
Before you start playing with your dog, spray a taste deterrent on areas of your body and clothes that you dog likes to play rough with.[7] When your dog starts biting you, stop all movement and wait for her to react to the taste deterrent. After two weeks, your puppy will likely have developed a strong distaste for your hands and ankles. A well-exercised puppy (exercised to the point of being tired) will not be as rough when playing with you. It's sometimes tempting to want to physically punish your puppy by slapping, hitting, or waving your fingers in her face. You might not enjoy being bitten every time you go out to play with your puppy, but you do want to forge a real bond between you and your puppy, and playing is partly how you do this. Though an adult dog correction can look harsh to humans, adult dogs are quite adept at teaching puppies appropriate behavior. Some dogs use their mouths out of fear or frustration, which can indicate a problem with aggression.
Time-outs are often effective for reducing nipping and mouthing in adolescent and adult dogs. Before you interact with your dog, spray the deterrent on areas of your body and clothing that your dog likes to mouth. Owners of dogs who might be nipping, mouthing, or biting as an aggressive behavior would do well to consult a qualified professional, such as a veterinarian, a certified applied animal behaviorist (CAAB or ACAAB), or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (DACVB). A child should not be left alone with a dog unless that child has demonstrated competent dog handling skills and the dog respects the child. It may seem hard to believe, but most bites to children are by the family dog or other dogs known to the child. However if you are out on the soccer field or at school with your friends or acting in the school play you might not want to sit on a parent's lap or have them run out in the middle of the game or the play to whisper in your ear.
Dogs are everywhere and whether you love them, hate them or are indifferent, you and your kids are going to encounter them.
If you are going to leave your child in a home daycare where there is a dog, be sure to visit, meet the dog and ensure that the dog will not be a threat to your child. I know she's just playing, but it can hurt, and the more I try and get her to stop the more she does it because she thinks it's a game. As an added bonus, this training may also decrease the amount of pressure your dog would use should she ever feel threatened enough to bite in a different context. For instance, if your canine mouths when greeting, find another activity she can engage in, such as playing with a toy like the Chase-It, a stuffed animal on the end of a fishing pole-like handle, which can help direct her energy toward a more appropriate outlet. Puppies usually learn that they're biting hard by playing with other puppies or adult dogs. She should be rewarded and encouraged to offer positive feedback that does not involve biting. Encourage other forms of play that don't involve your puppy nipping at your fingers, hands, ankles, and toes. The problem is that these responses can do one of two things: they can encourage your puppy to continue playing rough, or they can encourage your puppy to act out with real aggression. Though most nippy, mouthy dogs are engaging in a non-aggressive form of the behavior, some take a decidedly aggressive approach to nipping and mouthing.
Playful dogs have a pliant, relaxed body posture, and their tails may be held low and wagging.


Some behaviorists and trainers believe that dogs who have learned bite inhibition are less likely to bite hard and break the skin if they bite someone due to fear or pain. Occasionally, a dog nips his or her playmate too hard, causing the victim to yelp and, usually, stop playing.
When your dog nips or mouths too hard, yelp loudly and ignore your dog for 10 to 20 seconds; if he starts nipping or mouthing during this period, walk away for 10 to 20 seconds. If your dog mouths you, stop moving and wait for him to react to the bad taste of the deterrent. Many trainers are also equipped to handle these cases, but owners should ideally receive a recommendation from their veterinarians before proceeding. Parents can educate their children about how to behave around dogs and how to recognize a bite risk situation. Fold your branches (hands) and watch your roots grow (look at feet) and count in your head until the dog goes away or help comes. Kids (and parents) assume that because the dog knows, likes or loves them that it won't bite them. Many people simply do not recognize the warning signs, even though the dog has been exhibiting these for weeks, months or even years.We are not saying that all signs of anxiety that we describe on the body language page indicate an impending bite.
It is important even for children who have dogs at home to learn that other people's dogs may not be as nice and tolerant as their own dog.
When choosing a game to use as a replacement activity, choose one with less contact to the skin, such as fetch or the Chase-It, rather than wrestling with your hands.
Puppies will nip and bite each other playfully until one puppy or dog is nipped too hard and gives out a high-pitched yelp. Stand up to stop playing with the puppy to further reinforce that her paper was not acceptable. Physical isolation from the pack sends a strong message to the puppy that she has acted incorrectly.[3] If the puppy bites you again, get up and leave for 20 seconds. Continue discouraging your puppy's next-hardest bites, and so on, until she can play with your hands gently and control the pressure of her bite. Teaching her the difference between right and wrong, not abandoning play altogether, will be best for both of you. If they are busy doing something, or interested in another dog or a squirrel, or they are tired they may not want to have attention from you that they might enjoy at other times. What we are saying is that the dog will tell you if it is uncomfortable in a situation with a child (or with you). Everyone will benefit from understanding dog body language and knowing when it is best to leave a dog alone, or even to ask the dog's owner to put him away if you are visiting. If you continue working with her in this manner, she should gradually decrease the strength of her bite until she applies no pressure at all with her mouth. Isolating the time and place your pooch is most likely to mouth will help focus your training energies to times when your pet is most likely to exhibit this behavior and will allow you to find an alternative behavior to substitute for the biting.
The victim will stop playing, and the puppy that bit the victim is taken aback and also stops playing momentarily. When it comes to the wikiHow community, he loves how everyone is genuinely concerned for each other’s well being, and he appreciates the advice he himself has received from articles like How to Approach a Girl. A dog may snap or bite in annoyance because the child is bothering it in that moment, whether the dog loves the child or not. If a bite occurs the child should be seen by a doctor no matter how minor the injury may seem. Dogs give us a lot of love and joy and we know that you want your dog to be happy and to have a great relationship with the family.
As you continue to play, require your dog to become gentler: Yelp and stop play in response to increasingly softer nipping and mouthing until your dog uses little or no pressure with his or her mouth.
Learning about dog body language and emotion and developing empathy for dogs is a great way to help improve the relationship with your dog.Read an excellent article about whether dogs bite "out of the blue". Realize that even the nicest dog can be pushed to the point of biting if multiple stressors come into play. Read an article that expalins how this can happen.Download our questionnaire to see if there are any areas of concern that may need to be addressed.
This will give you an idea if there are issues that you can address to reduce the bite risk in your home.Download our checklists to help you notice various dog body language signs in your own dog and in dogs on TV or out and about.




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