New Year’s Eve, The Fourth of July, Guy Fawkes Night and Diwali are nights I look forward to with child-like glee for the fireworks alone. Despite having the appearance of fancy photography these photos were surprisingly easy to achieve. Tripod – in order to get sharp pictures you need a stable base and a tripod is a necessity. Timer – if you are using bulb mode then use a timer to keep track of the exposure length. Neutral Density Filter – these cut out light without changing colours meaning you can achieve the same exposure with slower shutter speeds.
A torch – really useful to be able to light your equipment up while your set it up in the dark.
It’s not always easy to know where the fireworks are going to go off so being further back allows you to make smaller adjustments with the tripod than if you were close to the action. If you’re not editing RAW files but shooting in JPEG then a great piece of free software is Picmonkey where you can achieve similar adjustments with the exposure, colour and sharpen tools.
Fireworks are such a thrilling event and getting the photography mix right will heighten the excitement.
A zoom burst, or zoom blur, is a fantastic photographic effect which is simple, fun and easy to achieve. You can use a zoom burst to add movement and action to your photos, and to give them an abstract quality.
You don’t need any fancy equipment to get started with zoom bursts - just a DSLR with a zoom lens and an optional tripod. If your shot is overexposed, try using a narrower aperture, fitting an ND filter or reducing the shutter speed.
Snapping a zoom blur photo is all about timing, and it can be tricky to get right, so you’ll need to be patient.
Virtually any subject can produce a striking zoom effect, but generally ones with plenty of colour and pattern work best. Instead of turning your lens’s zoom ring, hold it perfectly still and rotate the camera instead. In the above tutorial you started with the camera zoomed out, and then moved in on the subject.


The zoom burst effect is perfectly suited to night time photography because of the long exposure times involved. Rather than continuously moving the lens for the entire shot, try pausing for a moment at the start or end of the exposure, or even in the middle. Taking zoom blur photos is all about creativity, so experiment and see if you can put your own unique twist on things.
The app offers a range of digital sliders and clear visual indicators to give you complete control over the camera settings.Long exposure shots can be achieved by controlling the Shutter speed (aka Exposure Time) of the camera.
For years my efforts with photographing fireworks fell far short of the experience itself so this year I decided to get serious and came away with some fantastic shots. By increasing the amount of time you have your shutter open for you can have more explosions in one picture.
If you want to take really long exposures then this will help you eliminate excess light between fireworks. In these pictures I was stood at the front of the crowd which gave me a clear shot but it meant I was too close to get enough space around the fireworks.
If you are able to talk to the organisers beforehand find out how the display will play out. With a DSLR this will allow your to control the whole picture, with a point and shoot you might not be able to control settings such as ISO – check out your manual to find out what you can do. You can experiment with larger and smaller apertures but the mid ranges will give you good sharp trails. The first shots will have the clearest skies as there will be little smoke so you can use longer exposures without much need for editing out smoke. We’ll be using a long shutter speed so this will help keep the blurry lines straight. Constantly review your shots on your camera’s LCD screen and make any necessary adjustments as you go along. Try photographing things like stained glass windows or city lights as these produce some beautiful, colourful streaks. Switch things around and start with your lens fully zoomed in, and then pull out from the scene.
This freezes the subject in sharp focus, but keeps the blurred effect for added creative impact.


If you don’t have a remote set your camera on a 2 second shutter delay to minimise the impact of movement from the camera. You can see in the bottom picture that by the end of the display there is quite a lot of smoke in the air. For this shoot the majority of fireworks exploded in the same spot in the sky meaning I didn’t need to go over 30 seconds to capture my shots. The general rule of thumb is the longer you have your shutter open for the more fireworks you will capture.
If you don’t have a tripod you can stand your camera on a wall or lean against a tree.
If your camera allows it, lock the focus and exposure at this point, so you know they’ll be correct when the subject is filling the frame. Try to zoom as smoothly as possible, maintaining a constant speed throughout and finishing just before the end of your exposure. By setting the time all the way up to four seconds, you can capture amazing night shots like seeing the light streams from car lights. You can even hand-hold your camera if you don’t mind a slightly wobbly feel to your photo - this can actually look really good, so give it a go. I’ve used a neutral density filter to allow me to have my shutter open about three times as long as without the filter.
Normally, this effect is obtained through long exposure shots, but given the limitation of a smartphone camera sensor, Huawei used this ingenious workaround.To showcase Light Painting, Huawei enlisted Canadian photographer Benjamin Von Wong and gave him the task to capture some amazing shots with the P8, no Photoshop allowed. In other words, you won’t be able to just pull out your phone and do something similar the next time you go for a night out in the city, even if the video above suggests that’s possible.Still, the results are quite impressive. Just a few years ago, taking shots like this with a smartphone would have been a pipe dream.Read on about the Huawei P8 (and it’s ridiculously large sibling, the P8 Max) in our review and first impressions posts. In other words, you wona€™t be able to just pull out your phone and do something similar the next time you go for a night out in the city, even if the video above suggests thata€™s possible.Still, the results are quite impressive. Just a few years ago, taking shots like this with a smartphone would have been a pipe dream.Read on about the Huawei P8 (and ita€™s ridiculously large sibling, the P8 Max) in our review and first impressions posts.




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Comments to «Taking long exposure shots at night programa»

  1. Lovely_Boy on 26.06.2016 at 21:22:34
    But for those of you with ultraviolet and visual violet, there's nothing better.
  2. dagi on 26.06.2016 at 13:49:10
    And the sunshine before sunrise and after sundown snap the holder and.
  3. 8km_yek on 26.06.2016 at 21:38:14
    Your first DSLR digital camera, after unpacking, you learn to compose comprises illustrated guides.