Canon eos 7d mark ii review - cnet, I was a big fan of the original canon eos 7d and eagerly awaited the 7d mark ii. Canon eos 7d mark ii: digital photography review, The canon eos 7d mark ii is the long-awaited replacement to the 7d, which was launched in 2009. Canon eos 7d mark ii af settings for bird & wildlife, What are the best af settings for bird & wildlife photography with the canon eos 7d mark ii? Copyright © 2012 Autos Weblog, All trademarks are the property of the respective trademark owners. I had the power to capture life around me — to photograph those fleeting moments and make them eternal through my camera. Then of course after getting more involved into photography, I discovered photography forums, photo blogs, and Flickr.
I then rummaged the rest of my savings (and also dug into my student loans) and bought a Canon 5D (the original). By constantly switching our equipment and gear, we never really get the time to truly know our camera and focal length.
Therefore by sticking with a certain camera or focal length for an extended period of time- it would help us gain mastery much quicker.
Of course digital cameras won’t last us 14 years, but sticking to a similar system and focal length is a good idea. Since I have been shooting with my 35mm lens for so long, I see the world in a 35mm focal length. I believe when it comes to a “one camera and one lens” philosophy, the way to go is with prime lenses over zoom lenses. Sticking with one focal length forced me to be more creative when it came to my photography.
Cameras - canon professional network, All content published on the cpn website is available in english.
If you want, you can pay Canon $100 to add a lock button in the middle of your mode dial so that the dial doesn't move unintentionally. Its light weight and ultra-high technical performance have made it the first choice for outdoor and landscape digital shooters who have to carry it all day. Not only does the technical performance of the Canon 5D Mark II far exceed Nikon's D700, D3 and D3s full-frame cameras, the 5D Mark II weighs much less than any of them!
Sure, the Nikon D700 or D3X feels much tougher when you're playing with it indoors, but when you have to carry it around your neck all day, the more plasticy 5D Mark II excels. The 5D Mark II is also the world's best camera for when you're shooting more than one kind of thing.
Sure, if all I shot were sports, news or action, the Nikon D3s is a much faster, tougher professional camera with better low-light AF in the corners for twice the price, and if all I did was shoot in a studio all day the Nikon D3, D3s or D3x are better because they allow easy in-camera 4:5 cropping, and if all I did was shoot in very low light even the D700 has better autofocus when using the side AF sensors, and if just want family pictures, the D40 weighs even less, but when I want take one camera to do the work of all these at the same time, the Canon 5D Mark II is unbeaten. The 5D Mark II is more than fast enough for action shots of family, it doesn't weigh much, and it has unbeaten technical full-frame performance. No Nikon at anything less than three times the price comes close to the high technical image performance of the 5D Mark II. The reason the 5D Mark II is so flexible is because it has three programmable Total Recall positions on its top mode dial: C1, C2 and C3.
Each easily can be programmed to recall everything about how you have your camera set: sharpening, color, saturation (and every setting for every one of the nine presets in the Picture Controls menu), self timers, LCD brightness, time-out settings, autofocus settings (modes and sensors selected), P Tv Av M exposure modes, resolution, file format(s), advance, metering, exposure compensation(s), white balance, WB tweaks, how many files the playback jumps when you move the top dial, everything in every menu, everything. If you reset a few things to something screwy and want to return to your preset preset, simply turn the knob away and back to the C setting you desire, and it's all as you preset it. I set my C1 position for general high-resolution photos in any light with one-shot AF, highlight optimization, LARGE JPG, auto ISO, high saturation, A5 tweaked AWB and more.
If you're following me, one click gets me my entire slew of settings in an instant to catch nature or to catch family. Its accurate: it matches my calibrated Apple monitor so I can make critical tone and color evaluations on it.
The 5D Mark II can be set so that one tap of the SET button wakes up a control screen on the rear LCD, from which we can control everything with the dial, joystick and SET button. All these great ergonomic items might make me forget what most people find exciting: the incredible resolution of the 5D Mark II, unbeaten in any digital camera at less than three times its price.
The digits at the bottom are smaller and thinner than my taste, I prefer the fatter, brighter ones in Nikons. The finder shows a multitude of things, including ISO and the ISO chosen by Auto ISO, but one item curiously absent is ISO when you are attempting to set it. AF works great under almost all conditions, except light so dim that I can't read, under which condition it gets slower. There is a simplicity to Canon's 9-point AF system lost on Nikon users: the thumb controller has 9 positions, so you can select any AF point in just one push. Good news: the files record this setting in the EXIF, and the 5D Mark II displays the set values on playback. Likewise, the 5D Mark II can fly through images on playback at amazing speed, in a completely better realm than the klunky LEICA M9.
If anything, the 3.9FPS rate is too fast, and I wish the 5D Mark II had a menu setting to give a Cs rate of about 3 FPS. Auto ISO isn't programmable or changable, but it's also much smarter than the Auto ISO in Nikons. In the 5D Mark II, Auto ISO knows your lens focal length, and automatically varies the lowest shutter speed accordingly. Since Canon's Auto ISO can't be altered, it's useless for shooting action with wide and normal lenses.
Canon's Auto ISO still isn't smart enough to know if you have Image Stabilization switched ON or OFF.
Auto ISO works even with Highlight Tone Priority ON, although of course it starts at ISO 200 instead of ISO 100. By inefficient, I mean that too often my flash runs out of power, or takes longer to recycle, than it would have if the 5D Mark II had a faster flash sync. The trick high-speed sync modes are just gimmicks, and are manual-exposure, and waste even more flash power. As mentioned at the top, the bright, sharp and contrasty anti-reflection-coated LCD is excellent. If you crank it up, it's blinding and easy to see in daylight, and you can turn it down when shooting outdoors at night, so you don't accidentally underexpose. The automatic brightness feature drives me crazy, because it dims the screen as I turn to put the camera in my shadow. I put this item in my MY MENU menu so I can change it for direct sunlight or total darkness. With the Quick Control screens, the top LCD is merely vestigial for setting the camera, but I find it annoying that when the camera is asleep, it is completely blank. I prefer the top LCDs of Nikons which usually show basic settings or shots left, even when asleep. Few lenses are as good as the 5D Mark II, so most of the time you'll be seeing limitations in your lenses more so than limitations of the 5D Mark II. I tend to photograph most things at +3 saturation, and people at +2 saturation, in the Standard Picture Style. At +3 saturation, things lit by warm evening sunlight tend to take off and get even more vivid, sort of like Velvia, but they shoot more towards a vivid yellow than go redder. I'm especially impressed at how good the 5D Mark II usually looks at my default Auto settings, even in poor light. I'm impressed at how great her baby skin looks, and the colors of her clothes are bright, too, and this is exactly as they came out of the camera in JPG — no raw whacking needed. Even better, when the auto settings don't give good results, it's easy to tweak the white balance, contrast and saturation to get what I want, fast, even under mixed artificial light, by looking at the LCD and seasoning to taste.
I'm impressed at how easily I can pull good results out of horrible mixed lighting conditions.
This night shot (the dot in the sky is a planet) was made at my default settings in full auto: point and shoot. If you split pixels, you will be wanting to shoot Canon's fixed (prime) lenses and leave your zooms at home. The 5D Mark II is so good that it has more resolution than most of Canon's medium and wide zooms, especially if you worry about the corners. Out-of-the-camera JPGs have the usual cartoonish Canon look: edges are sharp, but textures are softer. As hoped, lower resolution files get sharper because Bayer Interpolation is no longer needed.
This is much better than Nikon, whose images don't get any sharper at 100% when set to smaller resolution like MEDIUM and SMALL.


See Canon 5D Mark II Comparisons for actual examples and comparisons to other cameras at high ISOs. This shot out an airplane window was made at my default settings in full auto: point and shoot. I get great results with 30 second exposures, even without using the time-wasting Long Exposure NR mode. Unlike every current Nikon DSLR, the 5D Mark II has no ability to correct lateral color fringes. It rarely makes any difference, however because it forces the 5D Mark II to shoot at at least ISO 200, often shadow noise is increased visibly compared to ISO 100 or ISO 50. The rear LCD can be matted with a semi-transparent border to match the aspect ratio you've chosen. Tweakers managed to break the first version of the 5D Mark II and get some blacker pixels on the edges of blown-out highlights. Canon fixed this with a firmware update about a week after this was discovered way back in 2008. The 5D Mark II becomes uncomfortable after hours of shooting as pressure points make themselves obvious.
The grip is also too small; my fingertips are always hitting the front of the body as they wrap around the grip. The 5D Mark II's menu system is much better designed than Nikon's outdated, overgrown one-dimensional system. On the 5D Mark II, you use the thumb button (or top dial) to select which of several menus you want horizontally, and then all those menu choices fit on the screen.
Thus often when you draw your camera to fire, you'll discover that it's either turned itself off, or more common, has disabled the rear control dial.
Like all Canon cameras, a firmware defect still forces us to have to hit PLAY before we can zoom a just-shot image, or swap to other images when an image pops up immediately after we've shot it.
Worse, the PLAY button is on the other side of the camera, so you need a second hand to hit it. The Canon Digital Rebel T1i does this better: at least it has its play button where you can hit it with your shooting hand, even if you still have to hit it to do anything with an image just shot.
Nikons don't play this game with us; when an image pops onto a Nikon LCD after shooting it, you can zoom, scroll and select other images without ever having to press PLAY.
The little battery icon has more than enough segments to tell you what's going on, even in the viewfinder.
It charges very quickly, not more than a couple of hours for a totally dead battery, and it has a superb two-color light that blinks orange to tell you the percentage of charge, and turns green when full. The one at the top is the one in the camera, and the others are what you've registered and used before, along with their charge states when you removed them.
The 5D Mark II is so smart that it knows that shots made at higher ISO will have larger JPG file sizes due to the additional noise, and you'll see the shots remaining count drop as you increase the ISO.
The 5D Mark II is fairly stupid when it comes to sticking a card in it shot on another cameras. Poke in a card that's been shot on Nikon, and the 5D Mark II starts recording into the last Nikon folder, numbering its files just after the last Nikon shot! If the 5D Mark II were smarter, it would create a new folder for itself, and number from wherever it last left off.
For instance, I took a card out of my well-worn Nikon D3 and popped it into a brand-new 5D Mark II. I had to format the card, make one shot, put the card in my Mac, renumber the one file back to IMG_0001.JPG, and stick it back in the 5D Mark II to get the 5D Mark II back on track. I then have to rotate the actual pixels in iView's lossless rotate, so that the images read correctly in every possible application. The 5D Mark II comes one step closer to correct: it's the first camera I've seen that rotates its embedded thumbnails automatically. Please, Canon, let our cameras allow us to zoom and swap images right after we take our pictures, without requiring us to press the PLAY button first. The menu option to assign the SET button to be a PLAY button isn't acceptable, because I program my SET button to access the Quick COntrol panel. It constantly turns off my 5D Mark II, or at least disables my command dial, as I carry the 5D Mark II around my neck, so almost every time I draw it to my eye, I have to take my camera away from my eye and fiddle with the switch.
Nikon does this right: their power switches are concentric to the shutter button so they never get knocked, and they are easy to turn by feel with your camera as you're shooting. Canon needs either to move the switch, or add a clever interlock so it never moves by itself. The Canon 5D Mark II is the world's best DSLR for nature and landscape shooting because its technical performance is as good or better than competitive cameras that cost up to three times as much, and because it weighs so much less than other full-frame DSLRs. When you're in the woods all day, even if the performance was merely as good, the lower weight means you'll cover more ground and have more fun, which begets better landscape and nature pictures. The Canon 5D Mark II is the world's best DSLR when you're shooting more than one kind of thing at a time. If I'm shooting one thing like sports all day, or shooting in my studio all day, sure, I'd rather shoot a Nikon D3s that weighs and costs twice as much, and if I'm going on vacation without my family I'd rather take a tiny Canon S90 instead, but if I'm going on vacation with my family and want to do some serious shooting at the same time, the Canon 5D Mark II is the best.
The 5D Mark II just became the world's best vacation camera, if you have to deal with action, like kids, on the same trip so that a compact camera won't do. The Canon 5D Mark II offers the highest possible technical image quality in the smallest SLR package available. The Canon 5D Mark II is the most practical, and rightfully the most popular digital camera with landscape photographers today. The 5D excels not just in size, weight, price and technical quality, but also by having superb ergonomics, making it easy to get shots fast, before they go away. If you want a bargain and don't appreciate the huge LCD and exquisite ergonomics of the 5D Mark II, the old Canon 5D has much the same technical quality, with less noise and lower resolution, but with an awful LCD and pretty crummy ergonomics.
As this page is copyrighted and formally registered, it is unlawful to make copies, especially in the form of printouts for personal use. 1:23 pm January 20, 2012 By Julian Horsey Canon fans patiently awaiting the long time arrival of the successor to the Canon 5D Mark II, maybe pleased to know that the Canonrumours website is now expecting Canon to make an announcement about their new Canon 5D Mark III in March of this year. Rumours have suggested that the new Canon 5D Mark III will be equipped with a 21 or 22 megapixel sensor, and the announcement of the camera will take place after the February event covering the Nikon D800 camera. Eye-control autofocus is still being talked about as a possibility for the new Canon 5D Mark III.
At my high school graduation ceremony, my mom gave me a little Canon Powershot point-and-shoot. I now shoot exclusively with film, and make a living teaching street photography workshops.
I saw all these great photos with shallow depth-of-field (I didn’t know what “bokeh” was at the time) and I was blown away. I did some research, and bought my first used DSLR off Craigslist- a Canon 350d (Rebel XT). I felt bored by photography, and made the worst mistake— consulted the gear forums on online forums for some advice. I then wanted to look more “pro” as a photographer, so I bought a battery grip for my Canon 350d to make it look bigger. I had tons of gear forums bookmarked in my browser, and would read these inane discussions about prime lenses vs zoom lenses, corner sharpness, chromatic abbreviation, distortion, and how sharp one could take photos of brick walls. After much contemplation I thought I discovered the biggest issue to my photography: I didn’t have a full-frame camera.
Now I shoot with a film Leica MP, and still use a 35mm focal length when it comes to my work. Assuming you practiced something for 2 hours a day, it would take you 5,000 days to master something.
Assuming we are diligent enough as photographers to photograph for 2 hours a day, it would still take us 14 years to master our photography (with a given camera or lens). Of course if you are a working professional and you need multiple bodies and lenses for assignments, your case is different.
I enjoy carrying the 5D Mark II all day and night, but I'd be looking forward to dropping the metal D700 or D3s back at the hotel as soon as I could at the end of a day.
If I'm shooting in Yosemite Valley, and suddenly my kids do something cute, I can keep my eye on the finder as I turn the camera, and in one click of the mode dial by feel, I've reset everything about the 5D Mark II to my own preset settings for for kid's action pictures, as opposed to the settings I was using a second before for grand landscapes. For nature and landscapes, the 5D Mark II is way better than anything from Nikon at even three times the price, and even if someone gave me an $8,000 Nikon D3X, it's so heavy that I wouldn't want to carry it all day out in the woods. The 5D Mark II instantly changes all of its settings as you click from one C setting to the other. I use one Nikon for my family pictures, and a second in my studio because Nikon's settings banks don't recall everything, and they take about twelve button pushes to recall those memory bank settings each time.


Maybe you'd use one setting for night shots, since the 5D Mark II also recalls the LCD brightness and long-exposure NR settings.
The illustration above can't do it justice, because the 5D Mark II's LCD has a much higher resolution and much more brightness than the computer on which you're seeing this image. Don't turn it up that far all the time since it will blind you indoors, but when you need it, it screams. This just made obsolete the top-panel LCD and those tiny little setting buttons, and no more menus for setting shot-to shot parameters.
Hit SET to call it up, highlight what you want to change with the thumb button, and spin the big dial to change the setting. Faster lenses are no brighter, and you can't see the actual narrower depth of field of faster lenses. To set ISO (or preview the selected Auto ISO), sadly you have to take your eye from the finder and look at the back or top of the camera. Push the top right button on the back of the 5D Mark II; no menus required for any of this. It flies along at close to 4FPS at full resolution, and never gets hung-up computing or storing data.
Since the 5D Mark II only runs at Ch, I often fire two shots when I really only wanted one.
Instead of staying at the lowest ISO until the slowest shutter speed is hit as does Nikon, Canon's Auto ISO starts ramping up the ISO before the shutter speeds start approaching the slow limit. If your flash hasn't yet recycled (no ready light), it will seamlessly shoot exposing for ambient light, and the instant the flash comes up, will shoot based on the flash. I used an old 220EX for fill-flash, and occasionally as the key light, and automatic exposures were usually quite good. I don't notice any difference between the back of my camera and my calibrated Apple monitor.
I lessen this by shooting at ISO 50 and turning off High ISO NR, which lessens the softening of textures enclosed by edges. I usually shoot set down to 11MP (Medium) and get images much sharper than from 12MP (native) cameras, like the Nikon full-frame cameras. It's only about as good as Nikon's DX (small-format) D300 with it's Adaptive Dynamic Range turned on. With the correction turned on, which it is by default, the frame is evenly lit, instead of highlighted in the center. You can choose the Picture Style set for Live View to adjust sharpness, contrast, color saturation and white balance. It's not that obvious as you look at each camera, but Nikons are sculpted to fit and feel perfect, while the 5D Mark II looks prettier, but its squarer surfaces don't fit or feel as good.
I have to pull-in my big American fingers and thumb to hit buttons, unlike a Nikon F5, which is designed for adult hands. To go down the list, use the rear dial or the little thumb button, and hit SET to play with them. If you carry the 5D Mark II around your neck with a strap, it will get knocked by your belt. They'll be as much as 8 MB if you've filled the frame with sharp detail, and 3 MB or less if much of the image is blank sky or clouds. These files will be larger, but since I can't see any difference, I shoot in NORMAL and save hard drive and CF space.
It won't matter when you print, but if you use your images as many places as I do, you must make sure that they don't come out crooked on anyone's computer or TV. I still have to rotate the actual JPGs, and when I do, iView dutifully rotates the embedded thumbnails back to crooked. Even ISOs too obscene to display in the viewfinder, like H1 and H2, read as ISO 12,800 and ISO 25,600 in iView. This slows us down, and makes it very hard to shoot with one-hand since the PLAY button demands a second hand.
Sadly, it is already fairly stiff (much stiffer than Nikon's), but its defective placement right on the bottom edge of the camera ensures that it always gets knocked. I've got some more whining under What Still Sucks about the Canon 5D Mark II, but they are just my usual grumbling. Even if you spend three times as much for the even smaller LEICA M9 with similar resolution, the Canon 5D Mark II's colors are much better. Nikon has nothing close to its multiple Total Recall C1, C2 and C3 settings, so I can photograph precise landscapes on one setting, active kids on another an instant later, and still have a third setting for whatever else I might shoot that day. Only the LEICA M9 offers this level of performance in a smaller package, but the M9's colors look awful by comparison. However, if $1,250 is your budget and you're only shooting one kind of subject at a time, a used old Canon 5D is also a very good idea.
This firmware makes the 5D Mark II a totally different and better camera from the original v1 firmware. If you wish to make a printout for personal use, you are granted one-time permission only if you PayPal me $5.00 per printout or part thereof. But as you can imagine the release date and full specifications for the Canon 5D Mark III are still up in the air at the moment, but as more information becomes available we will keep your updated as always.
I never considered photography before in my life, but I was amazed by the power I now held in my hands. I could barely walk for half an hour before my shoulder started aching and my legs felt sore. It causes us photographers to make excuses about our gear – rather than going out and making photographs with what we have. Sure, whenever a new camera or a new lens came out I got envious, but I still had an underlying philosophy to stick to. Prime lenses force you to see the world in a certain way, and whenever the world doesn’t fit the way you exactly want to, you be more creative. Instead of doing a full-body shot of somebody, I might focus on their hands, their feet, or their facial expressions.
This post is aimed for those of you who are hobbyists and shoot photography for fun, not a living.
With the 5D Mark II, I enjoy carrying it everywhere, and thus get more great pictures because it's with me, and not left at home. If you set something screwy for one shot, don't worry: after the camera times-out in about a minute (also selectable in a menu), when you wake it for the next shot, it's back where you preset it. Maybe you'd set one for motorsports at a high ISO, Tv exposure mode and no Image Review. This is which is why it's so wildly popular with digital nature and landscape shooters, who are usually shooting only one thing at a time. For instance, if you have the left sensor selected and want the right sensor, just click right. Unlike the 51 AF sensors with real facial recognition in Nikons, the all-sensor position of the 5D Mark II isn't very smart. Picture Control was standard, except for my personal default of +3 saturation, and highlight and shadow tweaks were on. Post a camera-original JPG online, and it usually reads crooked in a browser, for instance.
There are no perfect cameras, except for the discontinued Mamiya 6 and today's Mamiya 7, and possibly the LEICA M3. The closet thing from Nikon is the hulking D3X, which weighs twice as much and costs triple the 5D Mark II. The original Canon 5D still has technical performance better than Nikon's newest D700 and D3s. I still wasn’t satisfied with my photography, so after looking at some great macro photography online I bought a Sigma 105mm Macro Lens (I used it only twice).
Never again will you make the first shot of the day at ISO 12,800 and 2,500K WB from the night before. The old 5D's images are spectacular, its just that the old 5D is no fun to use with its tiny, dim and off-color LCD.
The camera was perfect for me, and I never made it an excuse for not being able to take good photos. Zoom lenses tend to make you lazy, as you can just zoom in and out without making as much of an effort.



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