Photography Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional, enthusiast and amateur photographers. EDIT: I am looking for scenario where downtown is in the background and person is in front. EDIT: I am including the picture I took with Chicago downtown in the background and my friend in the foreground. I don't have any fast lenses so I can't say how much of a difference a fast lens will make, however I know that proper support makes a big difference! The hour before sunset is called the blue hour and gives you very rich dark blues in the sky. Fast lenses are good, and will allow you to get candids by streetlight with a high ISO but to get really good night photos you really need some kind of camera support. Camera support doesn't have to be a huge tripod, your Rebel has the advantage of being lightweight so you could use a compact tripod or something like a GorillaPod which is more versatile and easy to carry around.
You will also (if you have a choice) want to shoot in the first hour past sunset or the hour before sunrise for the best lighting. Apart from sensor size, what D-SLR you have won't significantly affect your ability to take low-light photographs.
Responding directly to your sample image, all you need to add is a tripod provided your subject is willing to stand still (as he apparently is). Not the answer you're looking for?Browse other questions tagged canon night or ask your own question.
As i'm quite new and amateur in photography, can anyone advise or teach me on how to take night portrait shots with Canon S110? The terms ISO, Apeture and Shutter speed seems new to me even though i have google them and try to have a basic understanding. This forum is moderated by volunteer moderators who will react only to members' feedback on posts.
How To Control ISO Settings of Canon 1100D – Rebel T3 New to Canon 1100D - Rebel T3 , yes you are. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type.
I have the Canon Rebel EOS T3i and was wondering what is the best setting to take firework pictures. Do you have a tripod?  Are you willing to learn to shoot in manual or do you want an automatic mode? You will also need a remote control or a shutter release cable in order to minimize shaking the camera when taking the pictures.
Set the camera in your tripod and take at least 5 consecutive images at the stars using the correct exposure time (using the RULE of 600) Do not move the camera to a different spot or change the settings unless you are done with that series of pictures. Tip: Every time I am done with a set of pictures, I place my hand in front of the lens and take another picture. The final image will be a large TIF file that you will use to bring up the colors in Photoshop.
I also edited the blue, red and green colors in the level in order to make the nebula more visible. Become a Contributor: Check out Write for DPS page for details about how YOU can share your photography tips with the DPS community. I have always been interested in stars and really saw the opportunity to try and take pictures of them. PS: in addition to the results of the sky, I tried taking pictures of my surroundings at night as well. Also if you’re in manual mode, how is it possible that there is exposure compensation setting? I just bought my daughter a Canon EOS 70D with 20.2 megapixels, EF-S 18-55 lens and EF 700-300mm telephoto lens. Also, an app for IOS called "Starfinder" (free download last time I looked) can help with finding nebulas and the Milky Way so you shoot more than just a bunch of stars without depth. I tried loading 1 image into photoshop and brightening it, but the amount of noise on the image was ridiculous. Thanks for the information, I followed your instructions last night and got awesome results.
If you are referring to the examples in the above article, I think you need to realize these are small, web-friendly images, not the original, high resolution versions. I'm late to the game on this one, but I was camping this weekend and got some great opportunity to take some shots for this technique.


Can' t wait to give to ago and as I'm going to the Isle of Mull later in the year where the light pollution is virtually 0 I want to get some practice in! I have been an amateur astrophotographer for many years initially using hypersensitised colour film and exposures through a guided telescope of up to 3 hours. Hey, this maybe a stupid question but when I watched your video I noticed that the image you were using was in grey scale rather than RGB.
If you shoot a lot of images, over a long period of time, you are making a motion "Time lapse" sequence, that can be sequenced easily in quicktime pro, for example. To sum up my understanding: To avoid creating star trails you take successive exposures of a shorter duration and stack them.
Just keep trying mark, I would bracket a couple of pictures first, and find which ones give you the best result, I am usually shooting about 30 second long exposures. It's a shame the video didn't fully explain what the photo was of, and what settings were used, or even how many shots were taken.
Obviously there is no one right answer but for just what it's worth I am picking one of them. The higher it is, the more amplification you're giving to the various types of sensor noise.
There is a short period of time between day and night, when the sky is not dark yet and when the city lights are already on. Using flash will ensure that you have the main subject sharp and well lit and the long exposure will allow you to capture the background. When using tripod you should get well rendered sharp background, when shoting hand-held the background will be blurred - but you can use it to your advantage, for example light paining - it adds a more dynamic feel to the photo. This will allow longer exposures without camera shake, but more importantly it will let you blend multiple exposures together in order to even out the lighting (when your lightsources are in the frame e.g.
This will cause more noise, but you will want to take that hit to get the higher shutter speed you need to get a clean shot. A full frame sensor will make a difference, but the first you must do is buy fast, quality lenses. He's using the slow kit lens and I know for myself that it struggles in comparison to faster lenses. You could add a fill flash but that introduces difficulties matching the foreground and background lighting. I am not an astrophotographer in any way, shape or form, nor do I have any expensive equipment.
Taking stars pictures in your back yard is possible, however for better results select a place away from city lights. That is to superimpose one image on top of the others (not all the images, but pictures belonging to the same series).
I have recently got the opportunity to use my dads old DSLR camera (Canon EOS 10D) as he stopped using it.
After checking multiple sites on how to take pictures at night and of the night sky, I decided it was time to try it myself. I know that this should not affect it, but are you happen to be using some kind of noise reduction for long exposures? ISO 1600 is a bit too low for me, but I still see lots of stars even then, just with less intensity.
I wanted to surprise her by having it set up and ready to do a photo like this but I have no idea about cameras. Second time around I got the shot (Really noisy as I didn’t bother stacking with DSS). Recently in Kona (where lights are dimmed because of the observatory on the island) I followed the 600 rule, 18mm, ISO 1200, and stacked myy shots. This is a circa 2006 camera, and at 7 years old, I am going to suggest the noise is due to a sensor of meagre capability (signal to noise ratio at 800 ISO on almost any camera has improved by leaps and bounds since then). I was able to get a series of photos from a clear, beatiful Maine autum night sky, that I'm very pleased with. If the camera you are using is of low quality, yes, you're going to see noise, but that is where the process of shooting a number of shots and stacking them helps. Digital photography is a good place for experimenting but you need the knowledge to do some things. I came home, loaded up my RAW files (they were a bit noisy due to the 1600 ISO I used) but I pressed on. I dont have an answer, my GH1 and GH2 process for about the same length of time that the exposure is.


My Images is in RGB not grey scale and when I used the technique you suggested with curves and levels it just comes out extremely red and orange. If you are wanting to just try to limit the amount of noise from low level light, then just a few pictures stacked will work. My Lumix gh1 and gh2 take about the same length of time to write the image to memory before i can shoot again. Weird as it loaded fine on a different machine with only 8 gigs of ram and much slower c2d chip.
I can't see that there would be that much 'hidden' cloud and nebula on a 28mm shot of the night sky, it looks like it was more like 300mm, but then with the rule of 600, could you get that much info in 2 seconds??? I would be also interested to know how we take good shots of landscapes just with moonlight.
Lowering the ISO only results in less noise if you get more light down the lens to compensate. You can reduce or compensate for camera motion with a tripod or image stabilization, but this won't help if your subject is moving. You can get lower noise and higher ISO with a more expensive camera, but even still there are limits to this. The table is burned in over 25 secs or so, then the face of the DJ is "popped" by the flash at the end of the exposure. Are you actually setting the camera up to WAIT say 30 seconds and then shoot (rather than setting your exposure to last that long)?
I wonder if you tried the same thing with a more modern camera with better noise control, if you'd have better results.
I used the Deep Sky Stacker software and when it "stacked" them, they were offset by a little bit (due to the shift from taking a series of shots over 3 minutes). This means that often star trails will look so short that you will not notice them (particularly with short focal lenses and no blow up of images). I realise the stars move, I just don't understand how you can stack successive images WITHOUT getting movement. The stars are all moving, those further from the north star in our hemisphere move further.
This effect can be used creatively, but sometimes it is an annoyance and can ruin pictures, e.g.
An off-camera setup offers endless creative possibilities, but is less portable than on-camera flash.
You want your subject lit and well defined with the cityscape as a well-exposed, complimentary light source. ISO should be the last resort to getting light in the camera (not that higher ISO is not warranted). The trick to successful night photography is to get much more light into your camera for a decent-looking image, as seen in the image above right. I compared my pictures to those my friend made with his camera and he got much better results than I did.
The shot I have uploaded is only 4 megs (I shoot with a 25 MP camera and the original is huge).
Consequently, lets say a 10 minute exposure would give a trail, 10 minutes in lenth, whereas a photo every minute for lets say 10 seconds in length, would give 10 stars with the same distance of the first example. You will find an older comment of mines here on November 11th where a page is linked with some hints on the subject. Second, though fast lenses give you more light and thus speed up your exposure times, they also crush your DOF. What DID frustrate me about the demo above, is the image was in colour, but the tab in the curves menu in PhotoShop said "grey".
The Photoshop problem is frustrating as well, as i have about the same setup that you do with the i7 core and memory.
I get memory errors and if i watch my Task Manager and memory usage, it i hardly being taxed, and i have played with many of the memory allocation settings without much help.
Increasing the sensitivity will however reduce your picture quality and may still not give you a quick enough exposure to handhold.
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Comments to «How to take night pictures with canon rebel t3i 600d»

  1. Biohazard15 on 21.07.2014 at 11:23:15
    Where the sun will rise.
  2. Admin on 21.07.2014 at 11:51:13
    Want to get into into Portrait Photography, maybe which.