It is a common belief that eating even low amounts of carbohydrates increases body weight, whether the carbs are from sugar, bread, fruits or vegetables. In reality, the amount of fat you gain while consuming carbohydrates depends more heavily on their type. On the other hand, refined carbohydrates (white bread, refined grains, pastries, sugared drinks) are easily digested and may contribute to weight gain and promote diabetes and heart disease.
Carbohydrates which you will get from foods of these non-refined groups will not turn to fat nearly so readily. June 11, 2012 By Vanessa Romero 19 Comments I’ve been an ardent supporter of a low-carb lifestyle for the better part of the past decade. These days, however, my adherence to a low-carb lifestyle is less about how I look on the outside and more about the health of my insides. For the general population, studies have found that those following a low-carb plan have actually lost less muscle mass than their low-fat counterparts even without exercise. I’ve lived this low-carb lifestyle for a decade plus a few years and have no anticipation of living any other way.
I first tried the low carb diet several years ago with my daughter, and lost about 15 pounds the first month — but then life events happened, I went off the diet and never went back until last fall, when I learned that I am now a Type 2 diabetic. While eating low carb is a struggle at times, especially when cooking for a family that CAN and WANTS to eat carbs, I no longer feel like I am being deprived of favorite foods. I just wanted to post how happy I am that there is more support and information now for low carb dieters.


Not low carb though it would be without the bun – but I always have burger patties and buns on hand, also crumbed fish wedges for quick fish and salad. The reason for this misconception may be that eating carbohydrates raises insulin, which then lowers blood sugar. Foods containing carbohydrates can’t be cut off a healthy diet because they provide fiber, sugars, and starches, which supply energy to the body in the form of glucose (blood sugar), which is the energy source for human cells, tissues, and organs. As an experienced low-carber, I thought it was high time I did a little series on my nutritional lifestyle. In fact, there are some studies that actually show that low-carb diets actually improve kidney function.
As far as the food goes, if you have been a regular reader for even the past few months, you know the food I eat is anything but boring. The digestion of a particular carbohydrate depends upon the complexity of its molecular structure.
Recent research published in the Journal of American Medical Association shows that people following a diet low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables, and grains actually tended to lose weight, despite their heavy carb intake. Even fans of low carb diets agree that the carbohydrate level should be adjusted to the individual. Considering this, some people advocate significant reduction of carbohydrates in their diet. For reference, most experts recommend that 45% to 65% of the diet can be carbohydrates depending upon the individual.


Besides, a properly designed low-carb plan is not high protein but moderate protein which research has shown to improve satiety and support lean body mass. But diets low in carbohydrates are likely to lack essential nutrients from plant foods, so people may not get enough vitamins, minerals and fiber. So, depending on their chemical structure, there are simple (natural) and complex (man-made) carbohydrates. While the fruit list is a bit shorter than the veggie list, I indulge guilt-free in fruits that are low in sugar but high in phytonutrients.
This is my first time on your site, and I am happy to see that low carb lifestyles are becoming much more widespread.
Athletes often follow a carbohydrate-loading diet, which involves increasing the amount of carbohydrates for several days before a high-intensity endurance athletic event. Simple carbohydrates include natural food sugars (fruits, vegetables, milk products) and sugars added during food processing (cakes, sweets, sweet drinks) and refining. Complex carbohydrates include whole grain breads and cereals, starchy vegetables and legumes. A healthy diet would mean not cutting off all carbohydrates, but to avoid foods with added sugars as they are usually high in calories and low in nutrients.



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