This resawing guide lets you correct for blade drift, and you can build it from parts you probably have lying around your shop. After struggling with his bandsaw fence, blocks, clamps, and a resaw guide, WOOD® magazine reader John Hodges of Kaufman, Texas, decided to design his own bandsaw resawing guide. Because few bandsaw blades track perfectly straight (making a fence almost useless for resawing), the curved end of part A allows you to steer the board into the bandsaw blade and make adjustments to follow your marked line. If you like this project, please check out more than 1,000 shop-proven paper and downloadable woodworking project plans in the WOOD Store. My experience resawing is if the cut is drifting, I can move the blade track to the rear or to the front of the wheels to eliminate the drift.
Another cause of drift is I somehow hit the blade with some metal and removed some of the set on one side of the blade. I have a 17" shop fox and i use the adjustment screws on the fence to allow for my tiny drift.
I have found that if you will right click on the image,save the image location,then send it to your e mail you open the link and print away,real easy! I found that if you will right click on the image and save the image location,then send the link to your e mail,open it and print away. I found that if you will right click over the drawing and save image location,then send image link to your e mail you can open and print it with no problems. Getting free woodworking plans is the best way to begin your hobby or small business in building furniture and woodworking.
Once you have a collection of woodworking plans it is easy to modify them and customize them to make them unique to you as a craftsman. While the glue on the shelf is setting, cut the mortises in the side skirts and the long and short aprons, and then the tenons for the inner top supports. With the holes drilled, now is the time to dress up your base with decorative cuts and router details. Recreating the classic tumbling-block illusion using end-grain lumber is an exercise in precision. The one other item that really helped was the Freud LM72R010 tablesaw blade that I used to make the rip cuts. The top is made up of 84 hexagonal segments, each made of three rhombuses (or diamonds) laminated together to form the pattern. From your stack of ripped rhombus lumber, select one piece each of cherry, maple and walnut, and arrange them into a hexagonal bundle.
Once you have all eight logs glued up and dry, you’ll need to true them using a thickness planer. Lower your cutter head in your thickness planer so it just contacts the face of your log, and then lower it exactly a half a crank (or about 1?32″). Using a fine blade in your bandsaw or mitre saw, trim one end of each log square before using a stop block to cut each log into 11 segments 41?8″ long. While the tumbling-block pattern tabletop looks great, it can be quite challenging to build. Once the blanks are dry, plane them down to 2″ thick to even out the joints, then get out the glue again.
Start this cabinet by making four simple face frames that form the foundation of the project. After the four individual frames are complete, sand the inside and outside surfaces flat and smooth, then get out your router. Start by gluing and clamping the front edge of one side frame to the back outside edge of the front frame.
The unique diamond design on these door panels is a distinctive feature of early French-Canadian furniture. Routing the distinctive beaded grooves comes next, and this is where the fun really begins. To rout the bead on the side panels, I used a handheld router following a plywood straightedge clamped in place as a guide. Routing the diagonal beads and grooves of the door panel is a slightly different process, although you still use the same set-up and method. The main challenge you face now is planing and sanding the end-grain edges of the applique without chipping the wood along the points of the triangles. After shaping all the parts, switch from your coarse sanding block to a fine-grit block when the profile looks good, then finish-sand all parts.
French settlers often painted their furniture to brighten up the home and escape the monotony of blonde wood throughout the house. I started with a wash coat of one part Classic Oak Polyshades and one part golden oak stain. Complete your cabinet by attaching the door with some reproduction or antique-style hinges and a door knob. Woodworking plans plans, Free woodworking plans plans ,get woodworking tips, techniques, project plans.
Woodworking plans, tool reviews, free woodworking plans, Woodworking plans, tool reviews, free woodworking plans and downloadable seminars by wood magazine. You can build one just like it by gathering up some scrap stock and following the illustrations below. Adjust the center portion of the jig (A) until the bandsaw blade aligns with the marked line on the wood. Learning woodworking is a good way to start a new career or turn your hobby into a money making business. Some are good enough for everyone to build, but many leave out key dimensions or material lists. If you want to sell your pieces, it is best not to have furniture that looks exactly like everyone elses.


This is a nice weekend project to build that will make a nice addition to a front entryway in your house. The problem is that there are so many terrible plans that you will end up searching a long time just to find the plans you want. Otherwise, cut the truss boards to 20″ length and set in place and mark angles by hand. Once the bottom shelf is dry, scrape, sand or plane the surfaces to remove any glue squeeze-out, then mark and cut the tenons to fit through the mortises in the side skirts.
If you do the math, it adds up to a lot of dowel holes that need to be drilled in precisely the right places. An end-grain block is the hallmark of a professional chef, as it preserves sharp knife edges far better than a cross-grain or acrylic board. This blade is made specifically for rip cuts in thick hardwood; as the lumber we are using needs to glue up perfectly right off the saw, this blade is a good investment. In order to make these segments, I started by assembling eight hexagonal “logs” 48″ long, cutting them to length later.
It is imperative that all of your lumber is exactly the same thickness to ensure there is no deviation between boards.
Set your tablesaw blade to 30° from square (creating 60° bevels on the wood) and double-check the angle. Flip and rotate your pieces within the bundle to get the grain direction of each piece perpendicular to the ones beside it for the best illusion. Scrape off any squeeze-out, then label the sides of each log, at both ends, using the numbers one to six. Take four blocks and slice them in half on your bandsaw, cutting down through the point of the maple and through the seam between the walnut and cherry to form the filler blocks for the short ends of the top, then slice the maple diamonds in half (down through the point) for the 10 half-segments that make up the long edges of the top.
You will see that the board is made up of eight staggered rows of 10 full blocks, with half-blocks filling in the edges of the cutting board. The hexagonal shapes make alignment and clamping difficult, the sheer size and weight of the assembly makes shifting individual pieces tough, and the limited open time of the glue meant I had to work quickly to get it all together. Small ones are most easily filled with two-part epoxy dribbled into the cracks, left to harden and sanded flush.
The wood requires careful placement of your pushsticks on the stock and extreme caution as you cut because a large portion of the stock remains unsupported by the table due to the previously cut angle. If you’d like to create a more traditional (and simpler) butcher-block top, opt for a checkerboard pattern.
Cut the front and back stiles, the side stiles, and the top and bottom rails to size, then mark each piece to indicate its location and outside surfaces.
Cut the parts to size, then join two long and short frame members, using two #8 x 2″ screws into each overlapped corner. Allow these parts to dry, then position and clamp the two inner frames to the inside of the front-side assembly.
Rout a profile along the front and side edges before sanding the surface smooth with 120-grit paper. I’ll admit that these are a lot of work to make-you shape them with a hand plane and sanding block-but the effect is really spectacular. As you select your pieces, remember that the grain direction of the applique you add must be the same as the underlying wood of the panels. It’s very fragile here, and to get around this snag I recommend shaping the end-grain edges first, before cutting the parts to shape from your planks. This combination doesn’t allow the finish to penetrate too quickly, preventing blotching. Set the back and side panels into their rabbets from the inside, and then secure them with nylon clips. While the plans are free, they really don’t give you everything you need to actually build the item. Check out out this site for a collection of 16,000 plans that contains any woodworking plan you can think of. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Although I’m a big fan of handcut joinery, quite frankly, the thought of handcutting the 16 through mortises and laying out and drilling 144 dowel holes for what would ultimately be a utility piece of furniture didn’t appeal to me. Make the cuts on your bandsaw and clean up the saw marks with a few passes of a block plane or sandpaper wrapped around a sanding block.
Apply tape over the mid part of the tenons and over the dowel holes, then prefinish all of the individual pieces.
For your top, you can choose to reproduce my pattern, or you can go with a simpler arrangement of one or two species. Once you have your orientation picked, apply a coat of top-quality, water-tolerant glue, such as Titebond III, to the mating faces with a small roller, and bring the pieces together into a hexagonal log. You have planed half of the faces now, so you will need to lower the cutter head again by the same amount as the initial adjustment (half a crank) and then plane Sides 4, 5 and 6. So, take a breather, get all of your supplies together (including bar clamps), plan out your assembly and jump in. I did the same with the next piece, and then set it into position against the preceding one. If you end up with a larger gap or two, cut a tapered wedge in matching wood the same width as the crack and slightly thicker, put some epoxy down the crack and tap in the wedge until snug. Because I used three species of wood with different (although similar) expansion rates, I wanted to seal the wood as thoroughly as possible to avoid movement issues.
It applies easily, buffs to a nice shine, is non-toxic and makes the shop smell wonderful when you apply it. While you work, keep everything organized by frame, and don’t forget to cut curves into the bottom inside corner of the back and front leg parts.


The bottom frame should be flush with the bottom rails; the top frame should be flush with the front and side top edges.
On the door panel only, mark an X pattern diagonally where previous pencil lines intersect at the corners. The remaining edges can then be shaped after cutting, without much fear of chipping a corner. Prepare it from the grid diagram on page 33, then regularly check it against the edge you’re working on for reference. The plans on this page are the kinds of plans that you should look for when looking for designs on the internet. If you don’t have access to lumber that thick, laminate thinner pieces to achieve the required size. First, I marked a line 9″ up from the bottom of each leg to show the location of the top of the side skirts. With the holes drilled, you can glue and clamp the cleats in place on the inside faces and flush with the tops of the aprons and top supports. Prefinishing is far easier than finishing the nooks and crannies that appear after assembly. Whichever method you choose, stick with the tighter-grained hardwoods such as hard maple, cherry or even purpleheart.
For measuring the angles, I went digital with the Wixey digital angle gauge to set the critical saw blade angles.
I then pulled the wood back from the blade and measured the width of the newly sawn face with my digital calipers, comparing that measurement to the width of the first angled cuts I had made previously on all of the boards. The low-angle, bevel-up blade slices the end-grain cleanly, and the heft of the plane helps plow through the wood.
To do this, I set out to fill the straw-like cells that make up end-grain as fully as possible with a curing finish.
You could glue these strips into wider blanks, but the 12″ width is good because it fits through benchtop thickness planers. Centre the top on the cabinet, back edge flush with the cabinet back, then secure the top with metal fasteners from inside. Cut the shelf now, then glue and clamp a solid pine edge strip on the front to cap the raw plywood edge.
On the side panels, locate the centre point of each line, then draw the large diamond-shaped outline onto both panels. What you’re aiming for is a large, diamond-shaped applique at the centre of both side panels, flanked by four triangular pieces at the corners. I used a combination of jig-cut through mortise-and-tenon and dowel joinery to make a strong, good-looking base.
With the legs cut, plane 5?4 lumber to 1″ thick for the rest of the base components and cut them to size. These cleats allow you to attach the top later, and the oversize holes allow for the inevitable seasonal wood movement in the top. I used three coats of Deft spray lacquer on my base, but tung oil or polyurethane are good options as well. Cut all of the first edges in one session to avoid moving the fence and introducing inaccuracy. If there’s any difference in width between the first round of cuts and the second, adjust the fence and make another trial cut. Multiple wraps of the cord generate a tremendous amount of clamping force at just the right angles, pulling the assembly together. I then built the subsequent rows in the same way, clamping each row individually as I went, quickly moving on to the next row, nestling each piece into the row preceding it.
If you are at all uncomfortable with this process, modify the design into a simpler checkerboard pattern. Next, add the opposite side frame to the front and inner frames, and, finally, add the back frame to the side back edges and the inner frames. But you can choose to use just one or the other style of joinery; just be sure to take into account the differences in the part lengths required for alternative joints and adjust your stock size accordingly. The FMT (Frame Mortise and Tenon) jig uses a set of guide plates to cut matching mortises and tenons precisely in your workpieces.
These instruments allow you to achieve a high level of precision, and help to make sure everything goes together at glue-up time. Repeat this procedure until the width of each face of the strip is identical, then proceed to rip all of the required strips. Wipe the board off, set it aside to dry, then repeat the process on the other side of the board.
It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Continue in this manner until all the blocks and half pieces are in place, then remove your clamps and wrap a band clamp around the entire top. I created two tenons on each end of the inner top supports and corresponding mortises in the aprons.
Tighten the clamp as much as you can, and adjust the pieces to get the top as gap-free as possible.



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