Complementary and alternative medicine (cam) in prostate and bladder cancer,hsv ii medication,herpes cure natural remedies - Review

admin | Category: Home Remedies For Herpes On Lips | 31.03.2015
Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Adenocarcinoma: Cancer that begins in glandular (secretory) cells that are found in the lining of the bladder.
Having a history of bladder infections, including bladder infections caused by Schistosoma haematobium.
Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. Urinalysis : A test to check the color of urine and its contents, such as sugar, protein, red blood cells, and white blood cells. Cystoscopy : A procedure to look inside the bladder and urethra to check for abnormal areas. Biopsy : The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. The stage of the cancer (whether it is superficial or invasive bladder cancer, and whether it has spread to other places in the body). The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the bladder lining and muscle or to other parts of the body is called staging. Bone scan : A procedure to check if there are rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells, in the bone.
Urethral cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the urethra. Tests that examine the urethra and bladder are used to detect (find) and diagnose urethral cancer. Transitional cell carcinoma forms in the area near the urethral opening in women, and in the part of the urethra that goes through the prostate gland in men. Urethral cancer can metastasize (spread) quickly to tissues around the urethra and is often found in nearby lymph nodes by the time it is diagnosed.
These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by urethral cancer or by other conditions.
Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. Urinalysis : A test to check the color of urine and its contents, such as sugar, protein, blood, and white blood cells. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the pelvis and abdomen, taken from different angles.


Ureteroscopy : A procedure to look inside the ureter and renal pelvis to check for abnormal areas.
Biopsy: The removal of cell or tissue samples from the urethra, bladder, and, sometimes, the prostate gland.
Whether the cancer has spread through the mucosa lining the urethra to nearby tissue, to lymph nodes, or to other parts of the body. After urethral cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the urethra or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the urethra or to other parts of the body is called staging.
CT scan (CAT scan) of the pelvis and abdomen : A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of the pelvis and abdomen, taken from different angles. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of the urethra, nearby lymph nodes, and other soft tissue and bones in the pelvis. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by prostate cancer or by other conditions. Transrectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A procedure that uses a strong magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. ProstaScint scan : A procedure to check for cancer that has spread from the prostate to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes. Cancer that has spread through the lining of the bladder and invades the muscle wall of the bladder or has spread to nearby organs and lymph nodes is called invasive bladder cancer.
Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body. For example, if bladder cancer spreads to the bone, the cancer cells in the bone are actually bladder cancer cells. It forms in cells in the part of the urethra near the bladder in women, and in the lining of the urethra in the penis in men. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer.


A history of the patient's health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
The prostate gland makes fluid that is part of the semen.EnlargeAnatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. A transrectal biopsy is the removal of tissue from the prostate by inserting a thin needle through the rectum and into the prostate.
The results of the tests used to diagnose prostate cancer are often also used to stage the disease.
A small amount of radioactive material is injected into the patient's bloodstream and collects in abnormal cells in the bones. For example, if prostate cancer spreads to the bone, the cancer cells in the bone are actually prostate cancer cells. As the patient lies on a table that slides under the scanner, the radioactive material is detected and images are made on a computer screen or film. The dye coats the bladder and urethra and x-rays are taken to see if the urethra is blocked and if cancer has spread to nearby tissue.
A transrectal MRI is done to find out if the cancer has spread outside the prostate into nearby tissues. It may also have a tool to remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer.EnlargeCystoscopy. The radioactive material shows up as a bright spot on the picture in areas where there are a lot of prostate cancer cells.
A cystoscope (a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing) is inserted through the urethra into the bladder. A ureteroscope (a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing) is inserted through the urethra into the ureter.
Then a needle is inserted through the rectum into the prostate to remove tissue from the prostate.



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