Swiss army knife company, leather card holder money clip - Review

Categories: Metal Pocket Knife | Author: admin 20.01.2014

Consumers across categories express frustration with the difficulty of opening clamshell packages, and Victorinox Swiss Army Inc. The company has replaced its clamshell packaging with sustainable, paperboard blister packaging. I've had a lot of knives in my day, but only recently got my first Swiss Army Knife as a gift. The Swiss Army Knife has very humble origins. Switzerland was about as poor as it got in 19th century Europe, especially in the sparsely industrialized central cantons, where unemployment spurred emigration and the shuttering of businesses. Around the turn of the 20th century, the Swiss army decided to start issuing a pocket knife to each of its soldiers. After the first successful run of Soldier Knives and just a year into their contract, the Cutlers' Union began to falter.
After his mother, Victoria, died, Elsener named the company that grew out of the Cutlers' Union in her honor.
In 1908, the Swiss army decided to split its knife contract, giving half the order to Elsener's company in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, and the other half to cutler Theodore Wenger's company in a French-speaking canton. Today, both Victorinox and its Wenger subsidiary continue to manufacture the knives in two Swiss factories. The two companies put out more than 100 models of Swiss Army Knife between them, from the classic bare-bones Soldier-style knife to ones with laser pointers and 64 GB USB drives. Even with all this innovation, there have been just eight total models created for the Swiss army since 1891. The updates generally come out to accommodate changes to other army equipment, like new standard-issue rifles.


Karl Elsener ran the company he founded until 1918, and there has been a Karl at the helm ever since.
The company has been building custom homes in Morgantown, West Virginia and Southwest Pennsylvania for over 30 years.
On the tamer side, the knife is also admired for its design and is displayed in the New York Museum of Modern Art and the State Museum for Applied Art in Munich.
Karl Elsener, a cutler, or knife maker, desperately wanted to create jobs in his home canton of Schwyz, but to industrialize the traditionally hand-crafted production of knives would have required enormous capital.
Since no Swiss company had the means to produce the quantity needed, it purchased the first 15,000 knives from a German knife manufacturer. The craftsmen couldn't keep up with demand and many of the workers quit, but the others carried on and even released a new Elsener-designed "officer's knife." The new model's tools were spring-loaded, making it lighter and allowing for the addition of a corkscrew.
They claimed this was in the interest of national harmony and absolved them of regional favoritism, but the competition probably also helped them with costs, and pushed both companies on the design front, too. They each supply some 25,000 knives a year - less than a day's production - to the Swiss army. Of the two, Wenger is more well known for its cutting-edge and unconventional models, like the ergonomically-contoured EvoGrip and the Giant, a nine-inch-wide, $1,400 monster of a knife with 85 implements. Elsener could not afford to build a factory or buy machinery so, instead, he founded the Swiss Cutlers' Union in 1884 in the village of Ibach.
Elsener thought that the army's knives should come from Switzerland, so when the army contract was set to expire, he and the co-op seized the opportunity.


The army looked at the Schweizer Offiziers und Sportsmesser, or "Swiss Officers and Sports knife," but deemed a corkscrew not "essential for survival." They continued to issue their officers the standard Soldier Knife, and left them to purchase the new model on their own. Later, when the company started using stainless steel in some of the knives' components, Elsener added inox - a shortening of the French term for the metal - to the end of the company name to get Victorinox. Nearly a century later, in 2005, this arrangement came to an end when Victorinox purchased Wenger, reportedly to keep the Swiss Army Knife in Swiss hands after the struggling Wenger had been entertaining offers from foreign buyers. The rest of the two companies' massive output — each factory can make up to 28,000 knives a day and together they produce seven to fifteen million knives a year — goes to the civilian, mostly foreign, markets.
To ensure quality throughout the home building process, the company has relationships with the best architects, engineers, landscape designers, excavators, and interior designers.
A small group of some two dozen craftsmen joined the cooperative, manufacturing different knives for use in kitchens, in farm fields and on hiking trails. The army brass loved it, and Elsener's co-op was able to swipe the contract from the Germans.



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