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The drug Ranexa (ranolazine) may help reduce chest pain in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds. People with diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease, and people with heart disease and diabetes are more likely to have angina than those without diabetes, the researchers noted. The study included more than 900 patients who received either 1,000 milligrams of Ranexa or an inactive placebo twice a day for eight weeks. The study was scheduled for presentation Sunday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in San Francisco. The study also found that Ranexa had the strongest effect in reducing angina episodes among patients with poor blood sugar control.
About 347 million people worldwide have diabetes and about 90 percent of those people have type 2 diabetes. About UseHEALTH documents case studies, research papers, policy briefs, expert articles, executive interviews, industry trends and market updates pertaining to health ICT, medical technology, health insurance, health education, policy interventions, and more. To see our content at its best we recommend upgrading if you wish to continue using IE or using another browser such as Firefox, Safari or Google Chrome. Women with type 2 diabetes are 44 per cent more likely to develop heart disease than men with the condition, the largest study of its kind has found. Women could be screened for the early signs of diabetes so they can be treated early, the researchers said.
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Diabetes (otherwise known as diabetes mellitus, DM) is described as a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use the energy found in food. More specifically, diabetes is a condition that affects the body's ability to use glucose (a type of sugar) as fuel.
Sometimes the body does not make enough insulin or the cells do not respond properly to insulin. Type 1 diabetes used to be known as insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), or juvenile-onset diabetes as it often begins in childhood.
Type 2 diabetes used to be known as non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM) and adult onset diabetes, but it is increasingly common in children, largely due to children being more likely to be obese or overweight.
You will also see introductions at the end of some sections to any recent developments that have been covered by MNT's news stories.
1.7 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older in 2012.
Type 2 diabetes can be prevented through healthy food choices, physical activity, and weight management. The easiest way to find out the differences, as well as similarities between the two, is through comparing the type 1 with type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients measure glucose blood levels using a glucometer, small drop of blood from finger and a test strip. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body's immune system erroneously attacks the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin, destroying these cells and reducing the body's ability to produce sufficient insulin to regulate blood glucose levels.
Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body does not produce sufficient insulin and the body's cells become resistant to the effects of insulin.
Insulin use not only prevents hyperglycemic emergencies, but is a safeguard that helps to prevent long-term complications of diabetes by correcting fasting and postprandial (after meal) hyperglycemia.
Both of the major types of diabetes typically include different stages of disease, beginning with a state where supplemental insulin is not required to a state that does require exogenous insulin for blood glucose control and survival.
Beta cells in pancreas are attacked by the body's own immune system, therefore reducing insulin production, leading to elevated blood glucose. Persistently high intakes of dietary sugars leads to excess demands on insulin production, which leads to insulin resistance over time. Type 2 diabetes is more common in people with low levels of vitamin D, which is synthesized from sunlight. Obesity tends to run in families, and families tend to have similar eating and exercise habits. Insulin is like a key that opens up the locks on your body's cells so that glucose (blood sugar) can get inside and be used for energy.
Researchers from Imperial College London in the UK have found that babies born by cesarean section are more likely to be overweight or obese in adulthood than those born by vaginal delivery. Scientists have discovered a genetic deficiency in males that could prompt the development of the most common type of liver cancer and type 2 diabetes. On the next page we look at the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as tests and diagnosis and the treatments for each diabetes type.


Guideline for Management of Postmeal Glucose, IDF, October 2007, Accessed 28 February 2014.
Type 1 diabetes: diagnosis and management of type 1 diabetes in children, young people and adults, nice, July 2004, Accessed 28 February 2014.
Clinical Trials Gov, The Insulin Independence Trial (IIT) Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Oral Cyclosporine and Oral Omeprazole for Insulin Independence Among Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients, accessed 24 July 2015.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:MLANichols, Hannah. For any corrections of factual information, or to contact our editorial team, please see our contact page. Please note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Learn all about diabetes, a lifelong metabolism disorder that causes high blood sugar levels. Learn all about type 1 and type 2 diabetes and the differences between the two conditions in our article about the diabetes mellitus metabolism disorder.
This infographic shows that tall people have a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, but a higher risk of cancer due to dietary and interacting factors such as genetics and stress. Scientists at the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) and the Harvard School of Public Health describe the relationship of the worldwide increase in height with the development of leading chronic non-communicable diseases in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. These observations led the DZD scientists Professor Norbert Stefan and Professor Hans-Ulrich HA¤ring of the Department of Internal Medicine IV in TA?bingen and the Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of Helmholtz Zentrum MA?nchen at the University of TA?bingen (IDM) and Professor Matthias Schulze of the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam (DIfE), in collaboration with Professor Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health and Medical School in Boston, USA, to analyze the causes and medical effects of this increase in height. The study shows that height has an important impact on the mortality from certain common diseases, irrespective of body fat mass and other modulating factors. The authors suspect that the increase in body height is a marker of overnutrition of high-calorie food rich in animal protein during different stages of growth. The scientists advocate considering the factor growth and adult height more than hitherto in the prevention of the above-mentioned major diseases.
University of Queensland scientists have found a genetic basis for height and body mass differences between European populations.
Being tall is linked to a higher risk of cancer, especially for women, said research Thursday drawn from physical and health data for five million people in Sweden. If you eat more meals prepared at home, you may reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015. The significant role of beta cell 'hubs' in the pancreas has been demonstrated for the first time, suggesting that diabetes may due to the failure of a privileged few cells, rather than the behaviour of all cells. Forum for Injection Techniques (FIT India) in association with BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), launched the first Indian clinical recommendations for best practices in insulin injection techniques. A scientific advisory board of well-known endocrinologists and diabetes experts led the FIT India guidelines based on a combination of clinical evidence, the implications for patient therapy and the judgment of the group of experts. Traditionally, there has been a psychological resistance to initiation of insulin therapy in India.
Several factors, including the method of administration, dosing, compliance, selection of injection site, depth of the injection, time lapse before withdrawing the needle and misconceptions about insulin therapy, influence the success of insulin injection therapy.
Howard Weintraub, clinical associate professor in the department of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. The patients had type 2 diabetes, heart disease and at least one angina episode a week, and were already taking one or two other anti-angina drugs. It was also published online the same day in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and will appear in the journal’s May 21 print issue. Mikhail Kosiborod, associate professor of medicine at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, and a cardiologist at St. Prior research has shown that the drug may lower fasting glucose levels in people with diabetes. The main causes of type 2 diabetes are believed to be excess weight and lack of physical activity. Glucose is a form of carbohydrate that comes from foods such as breads, cereals, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruits and some vegetables. Insulin is a hormone (a type of chemical messenger) made by specialized cells in the pancreas. Prediabetes describes the condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the immune system wrongly identifies and subsequently attacks the pancreatic cells that produce insulin, leading to little or no insulin production.


In this condition, the body usually still produces some insulin, but this is not enough to meet demand and the body's cells do not properly respond to the insulin.
People who have experienced gestational diabetes do, however, have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. It can also be managed through lifestyle and diet, although insulin or oral medication may be necessary for some people. These two diabetes types have several key differences, for instance the differences in cause, symptoms, characteristics, management, incidence, who it affects and what effects the disease has on the body. Receptor cells that have become less sensitive (resistant) to insulin are unable to remove glucose from the blood, leading to higher blood glucose and greater demands on insulin production.
In most cases of type 1 diabetes, the patient would need to inherit risk factors from both parents. Autoimmune attack may occur following a viral infection such as mumps, rubella cytomegalovirus. Type 1 diabetes develops more often in winter than summer and is more common in places with cold climates. Type 1 diabetes is less common in people who were breastfed and in those who first ate solid foods at later ages.
Diets high in simple sugars and low in fibre and vital nutrients are more likely to lead to diabetes. Tall people have a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, but a higher risk of cancer. Previous studies have shown clearly that tall people, in comparison to short people, have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes but have a higher cancer risk. In particular, physicians should be made more aware of the fact that tall people - although less often affected by cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes - have an increased risk of cancer. Insulin is the main injectable therapy used by people with diabetes and is designed using high levels of technology to finely tune its peak and duration of action which is precisely timed.
Nitroglycerin is commonly used to treat or prevent episodes of chest pain in people who have coronary artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart). Most patients were taking cholesterol-lowering statins (82 percent) and heart drugs such as ACE inhibitors (88 percent). One in three American adults could have the condition by the year 2050, according to the U.S.
Glucose is also synthesized in the liver and is carried in the blood to the rest of the body to fuel cellular processes.
Insulin regulates blood glucose by stimulating the removal of glucose from the blood and its uptake into muscle, liver and fat cells where it can be stored for energy. When blood glucose levels get too high (hyperglycemia) this can cause damage to the tiny blood vessels in the eyes, kidneys, heart and nervous system, which is why diabetes is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, loss of vision and neurological conditions.
The latter effect is called insulin resistance, where persistently elevated blood glucose has caused cells to be overexposed to insulin, making them less responsive or unresponsive to the hormonal messenger. This condition is often a result of persistently high glucose levels as well as obesity and overweight, lifestyle and dietary factors, medications and other issues.
The authors discuss which dietary factors and other mechanisms may explain these associations. Among other consequences, activation of this system causes the body to become more sensitive to insulin action, thus positively influencing the lipid metabolism.
Hitherto, the importance of diet has been underestimated, especially during pregnancy and in children and adolescents. However, if the technique used for injection is flawed, the way in which the insulin works and will affect the patient’s glycemic control is directly impacted. Interestingly, in the Netherlands the per capita consumption of milk and dairy products is the highest in the world. These findings fit in with published data that suggest that tall people have relative protection against disorders of the lipid metabolism. The result is an inverse association with the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, but a positive association with the risk of cancer.



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Comments

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    27.09.2014

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    Some carbohydrates of their weight loss program.

    27.09.2014

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    Chromium and magnesium (amongst others) blood glucose and.

    27.09.2014