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Diabetes Fact #1: In 2010, there were an estimated 346 Million people suffering from diabetes worldwide according to the WHO.
Insulin dependent or Type 1 diabetes is caused by insufficient amounts of insulin being produced. In the non-insulin dependant diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes, the body produces insulin, but uses it ineffectively. Diabetes Fact #5: Diabetes has many health consequences, especially when blood sugar levels are not kept under control. Diabetes Fact #8: Treating and living with diabetes, is very costly, both to yourself in terms of lost work, medical expenses and much more, but also to the State in the form of health care and Disability Grants. It is just as important to make up your mind you are not going to be part of these diabetes statistics while you are healthy.
DisclaimerThe contents on this blog are personal opinions, experiences and research and should not be accepted and implemented without further research or consulting your physician.
Diabetes is on the rise in Australia and the rest of the world and has reached epidemic proportions.
Feeling tired and lethargic, always feeling hungry, having cuts that heal slowly, skin infections, blurred vision, gradual weight gain, mood swings, headaches and dizziness. You are more chance of  becoming diabetic if you have a family history of diabetes or if you are over 55 years of age – as the risk increases as we age.
There are so many benefits to strength training: increased muscle strength and power, increased muscle size and endurance, reduction in body fat, increased bone mineral density, increased metabolic rate, lower blood pressure, increased sense of well being and self esteem… do I need to keep going? Strength training programs should be designed by qualified trainers (and supervised where possible) and  and be reviewed regularly so that weights are gradually increased.
If you think you know someone who might be at risk of type 2 diabetes, their GP is the best place to start. Diabetes is a chronic disease with which sufferers must control their diet and may change their life style appropriately; otherwise high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels, overtime it leads to many health complications.
Chronic high blood glucose levels damage blood vessels, leading to long term complications such as vision deterioration or even vision loss, kidney failure, and amputations. Therefore, people with diabetes must receive appropriate treatments as soon as they are diagnosed.
The US, along with other western nations, has experienced soaring rates of type-2 diabetes in recent years, with figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicating that numbers have doubled over 15 years across 18 states.
Experts believe this diabetes epidemic is linked to rising rates of obesity and unhealthy diets, with the latest research from the UK suggesting that people’s love of junk food may be at least partly to blame. Researchers at Plymouth University set out to investigate the links between dietary iron intake and type-2 diabetes, after observing growing evidence of an association between iron and both the risk of diabetes and the likelihood of complications among those with advanced disease.
This is slightly surprising, given the fact that people have eaten red meat for thousands of years.
This is not the first time that the health credentials of processed meats have been questioned. Type-2 diabetes is known as a lifestyle-related illness, because the main risk factors are linked to people’s diet and lifestyle. I love lots of things like lifehacks, android, soccer and strangely I like to learn as well. Every sales job I have worked at I have been in the top 10 nationally(each company had 100+ salespeople).
From 1993 to 2009, trends in age-adjusted hospital discharge rates for nontraumatic LEA among the diabetic population were similar by levels of LEA. Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood is too high so that the body’s cells cannot use glucose properly.
Type 1, which occurs mostly in childhood and young adulthood and is due to the failure of the pancreas to secrete insulin (the hormone which allow the cells to use glucose) and nearly always has to be treated with insulin injections. Type 2 occurs when the body cannot make enough insulin or when the insulin cannot work properly. Diabetes leads to significant damage to the lining of blood vessels throughout the body leading to a variety of problems such as kidney failure, blindness, gangrene, loss of sensation and ulceration of the feet (see note 1), and to an increased risk of heart attack and an increased risk of dying from heart attack.
As diabetes can be asymptomatic it is difficult to estimate an exact prevalence in the borough. The proportion of people with diabetes has risen over the years and is higher in Enfield than in London or England (Quality and Outcomes Framework, QOF).
Comparisons between the predicted and recorded number of people living with diabetes in Enfield indicates that the gap between the diagnosed and estimated levels of diabetes may equate to as many as 2,688 undiagnosed cases of diabetes (14% of all expected cases). The proportion of people in Enfield with diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) is predicted to rise by about 30% (5,700 people) by the year 2030 (Yorkshire and Humberside Public Health Observatory). Death rates from diabetes have been falling, with death rates in Enfield being similar to those in London and in England (Health and Social Care Information Centre).
When diabetes is uncontrolled, the person may go into a diabetic coma and need emergency admission to hospital.
Lack of physical activity - it is estimated that if all the adult population met recommended levels of physical activity prevalence of diabetes in Enfield would be 14% less (1822 cases) (Health Impact of Physical Inactivity; Association of Public Health Observatories). A substantial number of the Enfield population are in higher-risk age bands (some 13,900 people aged 55-64 years, some 9,500 people aged 65-74 years and some 7,400 people aged 75 years and over). Many of the complications of diabetes can be prevented by a regime of treatment which keeps the blood sugar at the level it should be. People with diabetes can play a large part in looking after themselves and making decisions about their own care.


A National Diabetes Audit helps to monitor quality of diabetes care, and 22 out of 53 Enfield practices (41.5%) participate in this audit. The rate of complications of diabetes in Enfield is higher than that for people with diabetes in England and Wales overall and this suggests that diabetes control is not as good as it might be. In a large number of patients in Enfield, diabetic control was good as shown by blood glucose (indicated by HbA1C), cholesterol and blood pressure.
Data for all people with diabetes in Enfield (including patients of practices not taking part in the National Diabetes Audit) is available from Quality Outcome Framework (QOF) (see note 17).
In Enfield there is a specialist nurse diabetes team, which supports patients with diabetes and helps general practices to deliver diabetes care. There is a marked gap between observed and expected prevalence of diabetes; there is likely to be a group of residents currently undiagnosed and therefore would not benefit from advice and treatment. Diabetes is a common condition currently affecting about 19,000 people in Enfield of whom over 3,100 may be undiagnosed and are thus not being treated. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age, and above the age of 64 years, 1 in 7 people are likely to have diabetes. The complication rate for people with diabetes in Enfield is similar to the overall complication rate for England.
General medical practice plays a very large part in management of people with diabetes and this is often shared with hospital care. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has issued a very wide range of guidance on that management of diabetes over the years, including nine checks which should be carried out regularly on all patients with diabetes (NICE Guidance). The proportion of people with diabetes who are well controlled in Enfield is similar to the proportion nationally.
Encourage and enable people to eat healthily and to have adequate levels of physical activity.
Continue to improve and support diabetes care in general practice and in hospitals in order to increase the proportion of people receiving all nine recommended checks each year. Further develop and encourage shared care between hospital diabetologists and primary care.
Monitor diabetes prevalence in Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups for which data is currently inadequately available with a view to identifying other high-risk groups.
Note 1: Larger blood vessels have their own blood supply, that is small blood vessels that supply their walls and linings.
Enfield Council uses cookies to improve your experience of our websites.To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our cookie policy. In USA the Hispanic Puerto Rican group have the highest prevalence at 13.8% and the non-Hispanic white group the lowest at 7%. People suffering from diabetes cost the Government more than twice as much as people without diabetes. Although they can be depressing at first sight, they can also be the motivation to do something different to what we have always done in terms of health.
You are also at risk if you are over 45 years of age and are overweight or have high blood pressure or you are over 35 years of age and are from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, or Pacific Island, Indian subcontinent or Chinese cultural background.
Particularly for people with diabetes, strength training and increased muscle mass means more uptake of insulin into the muscle, (and therefore less glucose floating around in the bloodstream causing trouble.) Exercise increases the amount of insulin receptors released and an increase in muscle cells from strength training means more opportunities for insulin to bind to those receptors and move glucose from the blood into the cells.
Contrary to the popular belief that exercise should be light, research shows that type 2 diabetics, with no other contraindications, will experience the most benefit from moderate to hard weight training sessions. There are different types of diabetes, including Type I Diabetes, Type II Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes. The priority includes improving diet and eating habits, as well as adopting healthier life styles.
All 50 states have diabetes prevalence rates of 6% or more, and in six states the disease now affects one in every ten adults. As meat and meat products are one of the largest dietary contributors of iron in countries such as Britain, the US and Canada, they reviewed previous research that had studied iron and red meat intakes and the risk of diabetes. Processed meats are those that have been smoked, cured or salted, or that contain chemical preservatives. But the researchers believe that modified proteins in processed red meat may be to blame, possibly by influencing the output of insulin by islet cells in the pancreas. As well as the latest suggestion that processed meats may play a role, there are certain other factors that increase your risk of type-2 diabetes. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, data from the National Health Interview Survey. It used to be called ‘maturity-onset diabetes’ because it was normally only seen in people in their late 50s and 60s.
The predicted rise in Enfield is greater than that for England overall because the proportion of older people in the general population of Enfield is rising, as well as the number of people in ethnic groups with higher diabetes risk. Mortality rates fluctuate widely due to the small number of deaths and differences are not statistically significant. As stated above these include heart disease, stroke, blindness, peripheral neuropathy and kidney disease, each of which has significant health and financial implications. Other non-modifiable risk factors include ethnicity (Black African, Asian) and some medical conditions such as pituitary disease. National data suggests that the prevalence of diabetes is about three times higher in people from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and the Caribbean (Health Survey for England, 2004). In addition, a sizable proportion of the population come from ethnic groups with an increased risk of diabetes.


Most hospital care for people with diabetes in Enfield is provided by the North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust or Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust. In Enfield, just over half of patients with diabetes (51.4%) cared for by practices participating in the National Diabetes Audit, had eight checks that they should have had in the past 15 months.
The percentage of patients with good control was similar to that for the country generally. These results appear slightly better than those recorded by the National Diabetes Audit, but these QOF data must be regarded as less reliable as practices that take part in the National Diabetes Audit may have better management of long-term conditions that those that do not.
Enfield Diabetes Support Group, a branch of Diabetes UK, holds regular meetings for people with diabetes and their relatives at Chase Farm Hospital. The risk of developing diabetes is also higher in people from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh as well as in Black Caribbean populations. The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly especially in developing countries like China and India. In poorer countries, specially if they copy the more industrialized lifestyle, where there are often no facilities for diagnosis or treatment, the numbers could be much higher. More than half of all diabetic patients suffer from neuropathy in some form, usually in the limbs. Without going into too much detail, diabetes is essentially a condition where the body is not able to regulate its blood glucose levels. Type II Diabetes is the most common one, sufferers’ pancreas not only does not produce enough insulin, their body cannot effectively use insulin because of poor insulin sensitivity of their cells. Regular blood glucose monitoring together with a healthy diet and regular physical activities are the keys to reduce the risks of long term complications. This means that eating products such as ham, salami, bacon, sausages and burgers could be raising people’s chances of developing diabetes. Data computed by personnel in the Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC. But it is now seen in people of all ages and, most worryingly, in an increasing number of children. A further 3,100 (roughly1% of the registered population) may have undiagnosed diabetes equating to an overall prevalence of 8.6%.
Whilst there has been a general downward trend in the mortality rate from diabetes in Enfield, it should be remembered that the DSR is based on diabetes as the underlying cause of death. The rate of complications of diabetes in Enfield is higher than that for people with diabetes in England and Wales overall and statistically significant differences were found for both angina and renal replacement therapy.
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has also published detailed guidance on different aspects of diabetes care for Type 1 diabetes (CG15), Type 2 diabetes (CG66), diabetic foot care (CG119), patient education models (TA60) and prevention (PH35) (NICE).
The proportion of patients with diabetes receiving each check was similar to national figures.
The group has also published a handbook “Living with Diabetes” (Enfield Diabetes Support Group, 2008), available at GP surgeries in Enfield in four languages (English, Turkish, Somali, Bengali). Principally, because obesity is more common amongst people living in deprived areas, so too is diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes occurred traditionally in older people, but the worrying fact now is that younger people and even children are suffering from Type 2 diabetes. But I don’t want to freak anyone out here, what I do want to talk about is how weight training can help with management of diabetes.
Its principal cause is overweight and obesity and this is significant: as an increasing number of people become overweight and subsequently obese, we can expect an increasing number of people to develop diabetes. However, diabetes would have been an indirect cause in many more deaths by increasing the risk of other conditions such as heart attack, stroke and kidney failure. There is a mass of evidence that good diabetic care with good control of blood glucose levels better enables people with diabetes to live a normal enjoyable life and to avoid the serious complications of the disease.
Damage caused to the vasa nervorum, because of diabetes, itself damages peripheral nerves, especially in the feet. If diabetes statistics continue at their present levels of acceleration, the WHO predict diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in the entire world within 20 years. Of these, nearly a quarter of a million were children and young people under the age of 20 years.
The consens now is that Type 2 diabetes occurs predominantly in people with incorrect eating habits, obesity and those who lack exercise. Glucose (sugar) is carried in the blood and uses a hormone called insulin (produced by the pancreas) to convert into energy for use by the cells of our muscles. Unfortunately, this is not achieved in a high proportion of diabetic populations leading to increased risk of complications. With, for example, a consequential loss of pain sensation minor damage to the feet goes unnoticed. In people with diabetes insulin is no longer produced, or not produced in enough amounts so the glucose remains in the blood stream. And because the blood supply to the feet is compromised by the effect of diabetes on blood vessels supplying the skin and underlying tissues, small areas of damage heal poorly, if at all, leading to ulceration and further tissue damage including ‘dry’ gangrene where large areas of tissues, such as whole toes, literally die and become black and mummified. Unfortunately, because the blood supply to the feet is damaged, this surgical procedure runs the risk of leading to poor healing and ulceration and it is often necessary to make an amputation at a relatively high level to ensure an adequate blood supply to ensure adequate healing.



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