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Eating junk foods such as burgers, fries, biscuits and fizzy drinks may cause as much damage to the kidney as diabetes, a new study has warned.
Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and the number of cases are rising worldwide at an alarming rate. This causes an accumulation of sugar (glucose) in the blood, which can have severe long-term consequences for organs, including the kidneys, where it can lead to diabetic kidney disease, researchers said.
Hence, finding a way to block glucose reabsorption in the kidneys could offer a potential treatment for lowering blood sugar levels, they said. For the study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in the UK used animal models of diabetes and models of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance to see how insulin resistance and too much sugar or fat affect glucose transporters in the kidney. The rats were fed junk food consisting of cheese, chocolate bars, biscuits and marshmallows for 8 weeks, or a rodent chow high in fat (containing 60 per cent) for 5 weeks. Researchers then tested the effect of these diets on blood sugar levels and the different glucose transporters in the kidneys. They found that certain types of glucose transporters (GLUT and SGLT) as well as their regulatory proteins were present in a higher number in type 2 diabetic rats. Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. As you likely already know, keeping blood glucose (sugar) levels stable is crucial to type 2 diabetes management. Whether it's good stress (like the excitement of planning a wedding or a new baby) or bad stress (like pressure at work or problems in a relationship), feeling stressed can get in the way of your blood sugar control, Dr. Even a single serving of coffee may affect post-meal blood sugar levels, according to a study in the August 2015 issue of the British Journal of Nutrition.
Exercise is good for you if you have diabetes, so extreme exercise should be extremely good for you, right?
The old school of thought was that diet sodas were OK for people with diabetes because they are sugar- and calorie-free — but that thinking has changed, says Dana Greene, RD, a nutritionist in Boston. New guidelines say weight-loss surgery should become a more routine treatment option for diabetes, even for some patients who are mildly obese. Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are a deadly pair, and numerous studies show stomach-shrinking operations can dramatically improve diabetes. But the guidelines mark the first time the surgery is recommended specifically as a diabetes treatment rather than as obesity treatment with a side benefit, and expand the eligible candidates.
The recommendations were endorsed by the American Diabetes Association, the International Diabetes Federation and 43 other health groups, and published in the journal Diabetes Care. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, mostly the Type 2 form where the body gradually loses the ability to produce or use insulin to turn food into energy.
Studies have long shown that most obese diabetics who undergo bariatric surgery see their blood sugar control dramatically improve.
Until now, health guidelines have focused on surgery as a last-resort method for the severely obese to lose weight, with diabetes improvement considered a bonus. Tuesday's guidelines examined 11 studies that tracked diabetes patients randomly assigned to bariatric surgery or regular care. Also, the guidelines say surgery can be considered with a BMI as low as 30 for patients with poor control despite usual care. While weight loss itself can help Type 2 diabetes, operations such as gastric bypass, the most common kind, and other types of bariatric surgery are thought to help in a different way — by affecting hormones, gut bacteria and other substances that affect how the body handles insulin and blood sugar. Bariatric surgery — called metabolic surgery when performed for diabetes — has become far less invasive in recent years. Share this:Not always be seen or warning of their presence, but some signs that conveys our body and, in principle, might seem unimportant symptoms, we are really saying that we have a problem of diabetes. Prevention is investing in health and in this case, prevent diabetes is the best way to prevent more severe complications. Diabetes is a risk factor for other health complications, because if not diagnosed and treated can lead to problems of vision, kidney failure or neuronal disorders, among others. Thus, for example, the appearance of cracks, calluses, or cracks in the feet that do not heal, and sometimes hurt. One of the signs that make us more suspicious, perhaps being the best known, is the excessive thirst.
Diabetes mellitus – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Diabetes mellitus (dm) also known as simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. Definition, diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, Definition and diagnostic criteria ( top of page) ( contents) ( references) 2.
Diabetes mellitus – medical definition and more from, Definition of diabetes mellitus: a variable disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by a combination of hereditary and environmental factors and usually. My former co-worker Spike, fun in that good “Keep Austin Weird” kind of way, taught me many things.
Diseases of the kidney are a common finding in people with diabetes, with up to half demonstrating signs of kidney damage in their lifetime (1–3). The classic description of diabetic nephropathy is of a progressive increase in proteinuria in people with longstanding diabetes followed by declining function that eventually can lead to end stage renal disease (ESRD) ( Figure 2 ) (1,9,10). The earliest stage of diabetic nephropathy is hyperfiltration, where the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is significantly higher than normal. It is important to note that the rate of progression can vary between individuals, and that the clinical markers of the disease (i.e.
People with diabetes (particularly type 2 diabetes) often develop kidney diseases other than diabetic nephropathy. Screening for kidney disease in people with diabetes involves an assessment of urinary albumin excretion and a measurement of the overall level of kidney function through an estimation of the GFR.
When screening for albuminuria, the test of choice is the random urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (urinary ACR). The serum creatinine is the most common measurement of kidney function; however, it can inaccurately reflect renal function in many scenarios, particularly in extremes of patient age or size (33,34).
The eGFR is useful for assessing chronic changes in renal function but should not be used in situations where kidney function is changing rapidly. Urinalysis findings of red blood cell casts are not a common finding in renal disease due to diabetes, and white blood cell casts or heme-granular casts are not compatible with a diagnosis of kidney disease due to diabetes. Although 24-hour collections are not needed for routine screening in diabetes, they can be useful when there is doubt about the accuracy of an eGFR, when screening for nonalbumin urinary proteins (e.g.
People with diabetes should undergo annual screening for the presence of kidney disease when they are clinically stable and not suspected of having acute kidney injury or nondiabetic renal disease. Screening for CKD in people with diabetes should be performed with a random urine ACR and a serum creatinine that is then converted into an eGFR (Figure 3 ).
Once a diagnosis of CKD has been made, a urine sample for dipstick and microscopy should be ordered. Optimal glycemic control established as soon as possible after diagnosis will reduce the risk of development of diabetic nephropathy (38–42).
All people with CKD are at risk for cardiovascular (CV) events and should be treated to reduce these risks (see Vascular Protection chapter, p. The progression of renal damage in diabetes can be slowed through intensive glycemic control (38) and optimization of BP (55).
In CKD from causes other than diabetic nephropathy, ACE inhibition has been shown to reduce proteinuria, slow progressive loss of glomerular filtration rate and delay the need for dialysis (70,71). A variety of strategies to more aggressively block the RAAS have been studied in kidney disease, including combining RAAS blockers or using very high doses of a single RAAS blocker. Several classes of medications used commonly in people with diabetes can reduce kidney function during periods of intercurrent illness and should be discontinued when patients are unwell, in particular when they develop significant intravascular volume contraction due to reduced oral intake or excessive losses due to vomiting or diarrhea. Drugs that block the RAAS reduce intraglomerular pressure, which, in turn, leads to a rise in serum creatinine of up to 30%, which then stabilizes (79).
Mild-to-moderate hyperkalemia can be managed through dietary counselling, Diuretics, in particular furosemide, can increase urinary potassium excretion.
As the use of RAAS blockers during pregnancy has been associated with congenital malformations, women with diabetes of childbearing age should avoid pregnancy if drugs from these classes are required (84).


Many medications need to have their dose adjusted in the presence of low kidney function, and some are contraindicated in people with significant disease. Most people with CKD and diabetes will not require referral to a specialist in renal disease. Shading shows how adjusted relative risk is ranked for 5 outcomes from a meta-analysis of general population cohorts: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, kidney failure treated by dialysis and transplantation, acute kidney injury, and progression of kidney disease. 39 Anonymous Effect of intensive therapy on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. 40 Anonymous Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33). 41 Retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes four years after a trial of intensive therapy. 43 Tight blood pressure control and risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: UKPDS 38. HOLLYWOOD legend Tom Hanks has spoken of his daily battle with Type 2 diabetes – and describes himself as a “total idiot” for not controlling his diet as a young man. The effect of the diets on these transporters was compared with the changes also seen in rat models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The content is subject to Everyday Health’s editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance.
If blood sugar swings too high, problems can develop: If untreated, it can potentially lead to a diabetic coma, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Arthur, MD, an internist at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California.
Some over-the-counter cough medicines contain sugar, and decongestants and other cold medications can also raise blood sugar levels.
Plus, common coffee and tea additions such as cream and sugar can cause a spike in blood sugar, Arthur says. In fact, diet sodas may actually contribute to blood sugar problems: Artificial sweeteners found in diet soda and sugar substitutes may alter gut microbes in a way that increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and glucose intolerance, according to a study published in 2014 in the journal Nature.
They conclude the surgery should be a regularly considered option for certain diabetes patients — with the emphasis on better blood sugar control instead of pounds lost.
The risk of death or serious side effects from surgery is small and comparable to gallbladder operations or hysterectomies, said Dr. Insurance coverage has become more common over the past decade but remains spotty, and many insurers limit coverage to severely obese patients.
Diabetes, a disease according to medical data under-diagnosed, since it is estimated that around a million people have type 2 diabetes, the most common, without knowing it. To this we must add other symptoms that can hide diabetes such as frequent need to urinate, feeling of hunger or constant weight loss without apparent cause. Progression of diabetic nephropathy can be slowed through the use of medications that disrupt the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Key risk factors for diabetic nephropathy include long duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control, hypertension, male gender, obesity and cigarette smoking. Identification of hyperfiltration is not clinically useful, as it is difficult to determine from routine testing. Kidney biopsy series in type 2 diabetes have found that nondiabetic glomerular disease, particularly hypertensive or ischemic nephropathy, is as common as diabetic nephropathy in people with diabetes (7). Persistent abnormalities of either urinary albumin excretion or GFR, or significant urinalysis abnormalities, lead to the diagnosis of kidney disease in people with diabetes. Indeed, in people with diabetes, the GFR usually will be less than half of normal before the serum creatinine exceeds the lab normal range (35).
For this reason, a variety of methods have been developed to better estimate the level of glomerular filtration by combining the patient's serum creatinine with factors such as age, weight, and gender.
Dehydration and other conditions that lead to intravascular volume contraction can lead to a transient decline in renal function.
Although persistent microscopic hematuria can occur in about 20% of people with diabetic nephropathy, its presence should lead to the consideration of other urological or nephrological conditions. Screening should be delayed in the presence of conditions that can cause transient albuminuria ( Table 3 ) or a transient fall in eGFR. This can be delayed 5 years from the onset of type 1 diabetes but should begin immediately at the time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. In the absence of any significant abnormalities other than proteinuria, then a presumptive diagnosis of kidney disease due to diabetes is made. Optimal BP control also appears to be important in the prevention of diabetic nephropathy, although the results have been less consistent (41,43–45).
Progression of diabetic nephropathy can be slowed through the use of an ACE inhibitor or ARB (56), independent of their effect on BP, and these 2 medication classes appear to be equally effective for cardiorenal protection (57,58). The issue of whether ARBs and ACE inhibitors are similarly effective in CKD that is not caused by diabetic nephropathy remains controversial (72,73).
These strategies reduce proteinuria but have not been proven to improve patient outcomes in diabetic nephropathy (74–77) and come at a risk of increased acute renal failure, typically when a patient develops intravascular volume contraction (78).
Diuretics can exacerbate intravascular volume contraction during periods of intercurrent illness. Although these drugs can be used safely in patients with renovascular disease, these patients may have an even larger rise in serum creatinine when these drugs are used (80–82). Sodium bicarbonate (500 to 1300 mg orally twice a day) can also increase urinary potassium excretion, especially amongst individuals with a metabolic acidosis as demonstrated by a low serum bicarbonate level.
If a woman with diabetes receiving such medications wishes to become pregnant, consideration should be given to their discontinuation prior to conception. Appendix 6 lists some medications commonly used in people with diabetes and how they should be used if kidney dysfunction is present. However, specialist care may be necessary when renal dysfunction is severe, when there are difficulties implementing renal-protective strategies or when there are problems managing the sequelae of renal disease (85).
In adults, screening for CKD in diabetes should be conducted using a random urine ACR and a serum creatinine converted into an eGFR [Grade D, Consensus].
All patients with diabetes and CKD should receive a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to reduce cardiovascular risk (see Vascular Protection, p.
People with diabetes on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB should have their serum creatinine and potassium levels checked at baseline and within 1 to 2 weeks of initiation or titration of therapy and during times of acute illness [Grade D, Consensus]. Combination of agents that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (ACE inhibitor, ARB, DRI) should not be routinely used in the management of diabetes and CKD [Grade A, Level 1 (89,90) ]. Over time high blood sugar levels can lead to complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage.
Other medications that can affect blood sugar include steroids, some diuretics, and some antidepressants. If you have type 2 diabetes, she suggests you talk with a certified diabetes educator, nutritionist, or doctor to find out exactly how much caffeine is OK for you. Many can control the disease with diet, exercise, medication or insulin — but years of poorly controlled diabetes can lead to heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, amputations or blindness. Francesco Rubino, chair of metabolic and bariatric surgery at King's College London, who helped write the guidelines. Clare Krusing, a spokeswoman for the trade group America's Health Insurance Plans, said insurers will review the diabetes guidelines but that evaluating them will take time. We must not lower our guard, because some clues leave us diabetes to go forward to diagnosis and prevent complications that affect on everything in sight, liver, heart or nervous system. Some signs that can alert us to a problem in diabetes are the difficulties or changes in vision (double or blurred vision, lights or spots in the visual field) or the appearance of pain or pressure in the eyes. Kidney disease can be a particularly devastating complication, as it is associated with significant reductions in both length and quality of life (5,6).
Persistent albuminuria is considered the earliest clinical sign of diabetic nephropathy ( Table 1 ).
Additionally, aggressive control of blood pressure (BP) and glycemia, and the use of renal protective drugs can slow or stop progression of diabetic nephropathy.


People with type 1 diabetes are not expected to have kidney disease at the time of onset of diabetes, so screening can be delayed until the duration of diabetes exceeds 5 years.
The random urine for albumin is insufficient, as the urinary albumin concentration can vary due to urine concentration (24). When such conditions are present, screening for kidney disease should be delayed to avoid false positives. When such conditions are present, assessment of the level of kidney function may be clinically necessary but should not be used to assess the stage of CKD. Table 2 lists other clinical clues that may point to a renal diagnosis other than kidney disease due to diabetes. An abnormal screening test should be confirmed by repeat testing of the eGFR within 3 months, and 2 more random urine ACRs ordered during that interval.
The presence of clinical or laboratory abnormalities suggesting nondiabetic kidney disease indicates the need for appropriate workup or referral. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) can reduce the risk of diabetic nephropathy independent of their effect on BP. The degree of risk of CV events or progression to ESRD increases as albuminuria levels rise, and as eGFR falls, with the combination of albuminuria and low eGFR predicting a very high level of risk ( Figure 4 ) (53,54). In type 1 diabetes, ACE inhibitors have been shown to decrease albuminuria and prevent worsening of nephropathy (59), and ARBs have been shown to reduce proteinuria (60).
Blockers of the RAAS interfere with the kidney's response to intravascular volume contraction, namely, the ability of angiotensin II to contract the efferent arteriole to support glomerular filtration during these periods. In the case of severe renovascular disease that is bilateral (or unilateral in a person with a single functioning kidney), RAAS blockade can precipitate renal failure.
Screening should commence at diagnosis of diabetes in individuals with type 2 diabetes and 5 years after diagnosis in adults with type 1 diabetes and repeated yearly thereafter. And when blood sugar falls too low, shakiness, nervousness, anxiety, confusion, and eventually seizure or loss of consciousness may occur, the ADA says. Arthur suggests healthy coping strategies such as going for a walk when you're feeling overwhelmed. Avoid this scenario by checking your blood sugar before you exercise and always packing healthy snacks when you’re going to work out. A variety of forms of kidney disease can be seen in people with diabetes, including diabetic nephropathy, ischemic damage related to vascular disease and hypertension, as well as other renal diseases that are unrelated to diabetes ( Figure 1 ) (7,8). Initially, small amounts of albumin are leaked, below the detection threshold of a urine dipstick.
While these biopsy series are biased (biopsies are usually done in people with diabetes when nondiabetic renal disease is suspected), other studies have suggested that half of everyone with diabetes and significant kidney function impairment do not have albuminuria (15).
As the delay between onset and diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can be many years and as nondiabetic kidney disease is common, significant renal disease can be present at the time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (21,22), so screening should be initiated immediately at the time of diagnosis in this group. A random urine ACR predicts 24-hour urinary albumin excretion sufficiently well and is the test of choice for screening for albuminuria (23,25–27).
Furthermore, diagnosing a person as having albuminuria requires the elevated urinary albumin level to be persistent. This equation requires knowledge of the patient's age, sex, serum creatinine and race and is automatically computed and reported by many labs whenever a serum creatinine is ordered.
Because renal function can be transiently depressed, a persistent reduction in eGFR is required before it is considered to be abnormal. If either the eGFR remains low or at least 2 of the 3 random urine ACRs are abnormal, then a diagnosis of CKD is confirmed. This protective effect has been demonstrated in people with diabetes and hypertension (46) but not in normotensive people with diabetes (47–49). In type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibitors and ARBs have been shown to decrease albuminuria and prevent worsening of nephropathy, and ARBs have been shown to delay the time to dialysis in those with renal dysfunction at baseline (61–64).
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause constriction of the afferent arterioles, which can further reduce blood flow into the glomerulus in patients who are volume contracted. Myers Evolution of incipient nephropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus Kidney Int 58 2000 1228 1237 Published erratum appears in Kidney Int. Pieringer Clinical versus histological diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy: is renal biopsy required in type 2 diabetic patients with renal disease? Sharon The urine protein to creatinine ratio as a predictor of 24-hour urine protein excretion in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy.
Lang Proteinuria, renal impairment, metabolic control, and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pogue Effects of an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, on cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. You may know that skipping meals can lead to low blood sugar and bingeing on carbs can cause blood sugar to spike.
Alcohol can also interfere with medications you might be on for other health conditions, however, so check first with your doctor to see how much is safe for you to drink. Other healthy ways to lower stress include yoga, meditation, or taking deep breaths, she says. If you’re not sure how much exercise you should be getting, check in with your doctor or diabetes educator. In this chapter, we will discuss how to screen for and diagnose chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes, how to treat them with an aim to slow progression of CKD and discuss the impact of CKD on other aspects of diabetes management. These studies suggest that testing for albuminuria may be insufficient in identifying all patients with diabetes who have renal disease. At least 2 of 3 urine samples over time exhibiting elevations in urinary albumin levels are required before it is considered to be abnormal. A rapid decline in eGFR or development of severe hypertension would suggest prompt referral to a specialist. The exception to this approach is when the random urine ACR indicates albuminuria in the overt nephropathy range, as this level of proteinuria rarely resolves spontaneously, so confirmatory testing is usually unnecessary. In type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce the chance of developing new nephropathy (46,61).
For these reasons, all of these drugs can reduce kidney function during times of intercurrent illness. For these reasons, the serum creatinine and potassium should be checked between 1 and 2 weeks after initiation or titration of a RAAS blocker (82). But many surprising factors can also cause blood sugar highs and lows — and knowing about these eight may just make a big difference to your diabetes management.
In addition to measurements of urinary albumin excretion, estimations of the level of kidney function and urinalyses are required to identify patients with kidney disease other than diabetic nephropathy.
Kidney diseases of all forms can be staged based on the degree of impairment of eGFR (Table 4 ).
These renal-protective effects also appear to be present in proteinuric individuals with diabetes and normal or near-normal BP. In patients in whom a significant change in creatinine or potassium is seen, further testing should be performed to ensure that these results have stabilized.
In most cases, the risk of ESRD in diabetes does not appear to matter whether the renal diagnosis is one of diabetic nephropathy or an alternative diagnosis as management is the same (16). ACE inhibitors have been shown to reduce progression of diabetic nephropathy in albuminuric normotensive individuals with both type 1 (65–68) and type 2 diabetes (69). A number of additional medications need to be dose adjusted in patients with renal dysfunction, so their usage and dosage should be reevaluated during periods where kidney function changes.
Thus, significant renal dysfunction is not usually seen until late in the course of diabetic nephropathy (13).



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