Diabetes type 2 glucose levels chart 2014,homeopathic remedies diabetes mellitus wikipedia,permanent cure for type 2 diabetes quizlet - How to DIY


The pancreas has many islets that contain insulin-producing beta cells and glucagon-producing alpha cells. Since diabetes is a disease that affects your body's ability to use glucose, let's start by looking at what glucose is and how your body controls it.
When you eat food, glucose gets absorbed from your intestines and distributed by the bloodstream to all of the cells in your body. To maintain a constant blood-glucose level, your body relies on two hormones produced in the pancreas that have opposite actions: insulin and glucagon. Insulin is made and secreted by the beta cells of the pancreatic islets, small islands of endocrine cells in the pancreas. As such, insulin stores nutrients right after a meal by reducing the concentrations of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids in the bloodstream. Some people who are diagnosed with diabetes haven’t experienced any diabetes symptoms — their diabetes was diagnosed from the results of a simple blood test.
If you begin to notice any one of the above mentioned symptoms please contact your primary care physician. Type 2 diabetes: What is it?Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the body's ability to convert sugar into energy. To provide even greater transparency and choice, we are working on a number of other cookie-related enhancements.
The number of cases of diabetes and prediabetes among Americans of all ages and ethnicities continues to increase, according to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014 (based on health data from 2012), released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with diabetes often use a blood glucose monitoring device to help them maintain healthy glucose levels. Senior man using glucometer: Maintaining a healthy blood glucose level helps people with diabetes stay healthy. Biographya€?These new numbers are alarming and underscore the need for an increased focus on reducing the burden of diabetes in our country. Biographya€?If we want to reduce the overall burden of diabetes in our nation, we have to focus on preventing diabetes in the first place."a€?The number of people affected by diabetes and prediabetes has increased across all age groups and ethnicities. The pancreas is a compound gland, very similar in structure to the salivary glands, which is about 23 cm (7 inches) long, extending from the duodenum to the spleen. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetes in a person such as genetic inheritance, age factor, obesity, sedentary life style etc. The person who is genetically predisposed for diabetes, is highly vulnerable to the risk factors of the chronic diabetic conditions.
Type 1 diabetes can also be called as juvenile-onset diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. Actually, Type 1 diabetes is an auto immune disorder, in which the immune system launches its attack against the body’s tissues and for that matter attacks its pancreatic beta cells.
It is also found that the HLA (Human leukocyte antigen) class 2 region, located on chromosome 6, are involved in type 1 diabetes.
However, recent studies have shown that environment (especially viruses and diet) too plays an equal role in triggering this type 1 diabetes that is, genetic-environmental interactions has to be there and certain combinations of genes alone is not sufficient to claim itself to be responsible for causing type 1 diabetes. Even though, heredity plays an undeniable role in contributing to this problem, the pattern of inheritance is not fully understood in a clear cut manner. Your body tries to keep a constant supply of glucose for your cells by maintaining a constant glucose concentration in your blood -- otherwise, your cells would have more than enough glucose right after a meal and starve in between meals and overnight. Since your kidneys must remove the excess glucose from your blood, it ends up in your urine, which can cause more frequent urination with more volume. When you lose an increased amount of fluid through frequent urination, you may become dehydrated and thirsty. Since your body is unable to use your blood glucose effectively, it begins to break down your energy stores such as fat, which can result in weight loss or a failure to gain weight in growing children.
Feeling tired is a common diabetes symptom because your body cannot convert the glucose in your blood into usable energy.
Along with hunger and fatigue, it is not uncommon to feel irritable when you have diabetes.
Hope is an innovative and federally-qualified community health center offering comprehensive medical, dental, pharmacy and clinical research. This allows sugar levels to build up in the blood, which can lead to heart disease, blindness and other serious complications.
It is intended for general information purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death.
The failure of this small gland to produce enough insulin or if the cells do not respond properly to the insulin produced by this small gland , then that condition is diagnosed as diabetes. Among these factors, the genetic factor or family history plays an undeniable role in developing diabetes in a person.
People with an affected parent or parents are at 3.5 times greater risk of developing this chronic disease than people from non-diabetes families. For the children who are genetically susceptible to auto immune type 1 diabetes are likely to develop islet auto antibodies (indicators that appear when insulin producing beta cells in pancreas are damaged) in their early life.


Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes do produce insulin, but with some more complications. Diabetes mellitus cannot be cured in full sense of the term, but it can be effectively controlled, to lead a normal life. The cells take in glucose from the blood and break it down for energy (some cells, like brain cells and red blood cells, rely solely on glucose for fuel).
So, when you have an oversupply of glucose, your body stores the excess in the liver and muscles by making glycogen, long chains of glucose. Insulin is required by almost all of the body's cells, but its major targets are liver cells, fat cells and muscle cells. Your body is unable to use the glucose you have and is trying to tell you it needs more fuel. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health.
Ita€™s urgent that we take swift action to effectively treat and prevent this serious disease."a€?Now is the time to take action. People with type 1 affected diabetes have to live with the help of insulin injection daily, without which they could not have control over their blood glucose levels and this may lead to dreadful complications. In fact, this islet auto immunity is the first sign that occurs very early in their life, which is the indication of the future repercussions.
That is, either their pancreas produce inadequate insulin or their body cells could not use the produced insulin in an efficient manner.
However, insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes is mainly due to intra- abdominal fat accumulation which is mainly under genetic control. Diabetes UK estimates that over 600,000 people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the BootsWebMD Site. If these numbers continue to rise, 1 in 5 people could have diabetes by the year 2025, and it could be 1 in 3 people by the year 2050. The fact is that people who are genetically prone to diabetes, are born with a predisposition for the diabetes.
Moreover, as far as type 2 diabetes is concerned, only diabetic genes are not enough to give this chronic condition on their own. We simply cana€™t sustain this trajectory a€“ the implications are far too great a€“ for our families, our healthcare system, our workforce, our nation."a€?We know today that adopting a healthier lifestyle is the most effective way to prevent type 2 diabetes and improve health for people already diagnosed with diabetes.
Apart from genetic factors, obesity (central adipose), SEDENTARY LIFE STYLE, POOR PLACENTAL GROWTH, METABOLIC SYNDROME etc, are also held equally responsible for the onset of this diabetes. Diabetes may not have symptomsIn most cases type 2 diabetes doesn't cause any symptoms, or the symptoms are mild, which is why many people have it for years without knowing it, and why it's important to get tested. However, the person whose genetic, environment and lifestyle plays a cumulative role in the contribution of the disease, is most likely to end up in the clutches of chronic conditions. Warning sign: ThirstOne of the first symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be an increase in thirst.
This is often accompanied by additional problems, including dry mouth, increased appetite, frequent urination – sometimes as often as every hour -- and unusual weight loss or gain. Warning sign: Blurred visionAs blood sugar levels become more abnormal, additional symptoms may include headaches, blurred vision and fatigue.
Warning sign: InfectionsIn most cases, type 2 diabetes is not discovered until it takes a noticeable toll on health. Diabetes can cause damage to blood vessels and nerve endings in the genitals, leading to a loss of feeling and making orgasm difficult.
Prevention efforts nationwide are crucial to combat serious health risks.Individuals can learn more about diabetes and prediabetes by talking to a healthcare provider about the risk to them and their families.
Learn more about diabetes and CDCa€™s evidence-based and cost-effective interventions through our National Diabetes Prevention Program. Risk factors you can controlYour habits and lifestyle can affect your odds of developing type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for womenHaving gestational diabetes when you're pregnant puts you seven times at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later on. Having a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can also cause insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes in childrenAlthough older people have a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, the condition is affecting more young people.
Diabetes UK says around 35,000 children and young people in the UK have diabetes, with around 700 of these having type 2 diabetes. The leading risk factor for children is being overweight, often connected with an unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity. Once children are overweight, their chances of developing type 2 diabetes more than doubles. Often a urine test is carried out first, and if it contains glucose, or a person is at risk of diabetes, one or more blood tests to check levels of glucose in the blood are performed.
How does insulin work?In healthy people, after a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body.


Cells use the hormone insulin, made in the pancreas, to help them process blood glucose into energy. People develop type 2 diabetes because the cells in the muscles, liver and fat cannot use insulin properly, called insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes: Metabolism mishapsIn type 2 diabetes, the cells cannot absorb glucose properly. If you've developed a condition called insulin resistance, the body makes insulin, but the muscle, liver and fat cells cannot use insulin, or do not respond to the insulin, properly. With long-standing, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, the pancreas will reduce the amount of insulin it produces.
Managing diabetes: DietFortunately, people with type 2 diabetes can significantly reduce the risk of damage to their bodies, including damage to the heart, kidneys, eyes and feet.
People with type 2 diabetes should carefully monitor carbohydrate consumption, as well as total fat and protein intake and reduce calories. Managing diabetes: ExerciseModerate exercise, such as strength training or walking, improves the body's use of insulin and can lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Being active also helps reduce body fat, lower blood pressure and protect against heart disease.
Try to do at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, with some exercise on most days of the week. It can also increase glucose levels in your blood as part of your "fight or flight" response. Instead of letting stress take its toll, try relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation or just talking to a friend or relative. Managing diabetes: MedicationWhen people with type 2 diabetes are unable to control blood sugar sufficiently with diet and exercise, medication can help. There are many types of diabetes medicines available and they are often used in combination.
Some work by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin, while others improve the effectiveness of insulin, or reduce the liver's production of glucose, or block the digestion of starches. Managing diabetes: InsulinMany people with type 2 diabetes eventually develop 'beta-cell failure'. This means the cells in the pancreas no longer produce insulin in response to high blood sugar levels. In this case, insulin therapy – injections or an insulin pump – must become part of the daily routine. Whereas insulin pulls glucose into the cells, these medications cause the body to release insulin to control blood sugar levels. Glucose testingTesting your blood glucose level will let you know how controlled your blood sugars are and if you need to take action to change your treatment plan. How often and when you test will be based on how controlled your diabetes is, the type of therapy used to control your diabetes and whether you are experiencing symptoms of fluctuating sugars. Your diabetes team will suggest how often you should use a glucose meter to check your blood sugar. Common testing times are first thing in the morning, before and after meals and exercise and before bedtime. Long-term damage: ArteriesOver time, untreated type 2 diabetes can damage many of the body's systems. People with diabetes are likely to develop plaque in their arteries, which reduces blood flow and increases the risk of clots. People with diabetes are up to five times more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke. Long-term damage: KidneysThe longer you have untreated diabetes, the greater the risk of developing kidney disease or kidney failure. Long-term damage: EyesHigh blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to the retina, a critical part of the eye. This is known as diabetic retinopathy and it can cause progressive, irreversible vision loss. People with diabetes are up to 20 times more likely to go blind than those without diabetes. Long-Term Damage: Nerve PainOver time, uncontrolled diabetes and elevated blood sugars create a very real risk of nerve damage. Symptoms can include tingling, numbness, pain and a pins and needles sensation -- often in the fingers, hands, toes or feet.
Preventing type 2 diabetesOne of the most astonishing things about type 2 diabetes is that such a life-altering condition is often preventable.



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