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An insulin pump is a small computerized device used in the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes.
Pump users still need to test their blood sugar on a regular basis, usually 6-8 times a day. Basal rates deliver the specific amount of insulin needed at that moment, rather than having a long acting insulin peak, or deliver a flat amount if different amounts are needed for different times of day.
Because the insulin is based on what is being eaten, and when, the user has the ability to eat what and when they want.
Pumps can be programmed to have alarms to remind the user to test their blood glucose or do some other task. Since pumps only use fast acting insulin, the amount of insulin in the body can be increased or decreased for exercise or other events that may require more or less insulin, and therefore, prevent low blood sugar episodes. Pumps eliminate the need for injections; the infusion set gets changed every 2-3 days instead. Pumps can give boluses over an extended period of time to accommodate food that digests slower, such as pizza.
Since only fast-acting insulin is used, blood glucose can rise quickly if delivery is stopped, and possibly lead to ketoacidosis. Pumps need to be worn almost all the time, and may present an outward sign of the user's diabetes. How the blood sugar of diabetes affects the body, Diabetes mellitus leads to persistently elevated blood sugar levels. Blood sugar – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or animal. How (and why) to lower your blood pressure naturally, High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the most important risk factor for premature death, accounting for half of all deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and 13.
Pregnancy and diabetes – how to control blood sugar while, Oprah is a registered trademark of harpo, inc. For patients eating substantial amounts of food, you can use that calculated amount as the total daily dose. Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio.The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Read some examples and therapeutic principles on how to calculate the carbohydrate coverage dose, high blood sugar correction dose and the total mealtime insulin dose.
CHO insulin dose =     Total grams of CHO in the meal ? grams of CHO disposed by 1 unit of insulin (the grams of CHO disposed of by 1 unit of insulin is the bottom number or denominator of the Insulin:CHO ratio).


High blood sugar correction dose =      Difference between actual blood sugar and target blood sugar*? correction factor. This example above assumes that you have a constant response to insulin throughout the day.
Please keep in mind, the estimated insulin regimen is an initial “best guess” and the dose may need to be modified to keep your blood sugar on target.
It gets complicated at the worst of times, and sometimes you have no idea where to go or what to do. Between 40% and 50% of that total dose should be administered as basal, with the rest dosed out in nutritional boluses. You should give 50% of that total dose as basal insulin about four hours before patients’ IV insulin is turned off.
This range can vary from 4-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin.
Bear in mind, this may be too much insulin if you are newly diagnosed or still making a lot of insulin on your own. You will need to work out your specific insulin requirements and dose regimen with your medical provider and diabetes team.
Once patients start eating, add the rest in bolus amounts.You should also take into account how well the patient’s glucose was controlled in the ICU on the preceding day.
Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress.
Someone who is resistant in the morning, but sensitive at mid-day, will need to adjust the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio at different meal times. For patients with poor control, consider factoring in another 10% to your total daily dose. Talk to your provider about the best insulin dose for you as this is a general formula and may not meet your individual needs.
When you have type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly.
Like other types of insulin, insulin glargine is used to keep your blood sugar level close to normal.
For this medicine, the following should be considered:AllergiesTell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines.
Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.PediatricThis medicine has been tested in a limited number of children 6 years of age or older. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.Interactions with MedicinesAlthough certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary.


Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.Other Medical ProblemsThe presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.Each package of insulin glargine contains a patient information sheet. If you have questions about this, contact a member of your health care team.Since insulin glargine lowers the blood glucose over 24 hours, it should be taken once daily at bedtimeFollow carefully the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet.
It is a good idea to:Wear a medical identification (ID) bracelet or neck chain at all times.
Check and replace any expired kits regularly.Too much insulin glargine can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
Low blood sugar also can occur if you use insulin glargine with another antidiabetic medicine, delay or miss a meal or snack, exercise more than usual, or drink alcohol. Symptoms of low blood sugar must be treated before they lead to unconsciousness (passing out).
Someone should call for emergency help immediately if severe symptoms such as convulsions (seizures) or unconsciousness occur.
Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.
If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen.
Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.The use of the Thomson Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied.
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    03.12.2014

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