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Trends in Teacher Evaluation: At A GlanceSince 2009, the vast majority of states have made significant changes to how teachers are evaluated, this report explores those trends.Promise or peril? The Center for Public Education is an initiative of the National School Boards Association. The TILA-RESPA integrated disclosure rule replaces four disclosure forms with two new ones.
Ensures compliance with Federal consumer financial laws by supervising market participants and bringing enforcement actions when appropriate. Provides, through a variety of initiatives and methods, information to consumers that will allow them to make decisions that are best for them.
The CFPB is a 21st century agency that helps consumer finance markets work by making rules more effective, by consistently and fairly enforcing those rules, and by empowering consumers to take more control over their economic lives.
Inform the public, policy makers, and the CFPB’s own policy-making with data-driven analysis of consumer finance markets and consumer behavior. Strategies and investments that lay out the actions we will take to accomplish our outcomes. Prior to Congress enacting the Dodd-Frank Act, consumer financial protection had not been the primary focus of any one federal agency, and no agency could set the rules for the entire financial market. Industry structure is always changing, and therefore, so too will the number of institutions that fall under the CFPB’s supervisory authority. Develop and maintain an efficient fact-based approach to developing, evaluating, revising, and finalizing regulations.
Develop a rule-writing team with highly advanced skills in relevant and specialized legal and business areas.
Work with consumers and industry stakeholders on developing regulations to implement existing Federal consumer financial laws effectively. State-level estimates of persons who are currently uninsured, have public coverage, or have private coverage are included in this release for the 20 largest states. This release includes estimates for enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs) and consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) that combine an HDHP with a health savings account, as well as estimates of participation in flexible spending account (FSA) arrangements for medical expenses. In 2007, the percentage of children under the age of 18 years who were uninsured at the time of the interview was 8.9%. In 2007, almost 56% of unemployed adults aged 18-64 years and more than 22% of employed adults had been uninsured for at least part of the past year, and more than 32% of unemployed adults and almost 14% of employed adults had been uninsured for more than a year.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) is releasing selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S.
The 2007 health insurance estimates are being released prior to final data editing and final weighting to provide access to the most recent information from NHIS.
Due to small sample sizes, estimates based on less than a year of data may have large variances. NCHS imputed income for approximately 30% of NHIS records from 1997-2006 and will also be imputing income for approximately 30% of NHIS records in 2007. This report includes state-level estimates of uninsured at the time of interview, public coverage, and private health insurance coverage for the 20 states with the largest populations (2). National attention to consumer-directed healthcare has increased following the enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (P.L.
The data are derived from the Family Core component of the 1997-2007 NHIS, which collects information on all family members in each household.
NHIS is a comprehensive health survey that can be used to relate health insurance coverage to health outcomes and health care utilization. In the 2007 NHIS, the family income section of the questionnaire was redesigned to improve the collection of income information and to reduce the amount of income nonresponse. This report is updated quarterly and is part of the NHIS Early Release (ER) Program, which releases updated selected estimates that are available from the NHIS website .
There was no significant change in the percentage of children or working age adults covered by private or public plans from 2006 to 2007. Based on data from the 2007 NHIS, Hispanic persons were considerably more likely than non-Hispanic white persons, non-Hispanic black persons, and non-Hispanic Asian persons to be uninsured at the time of interview, to have been uninsured for at least part of the past 12 months, and to have been uninsured for more than a year (Table 7). Lack of health insurance coverage was greatest in the South and West regions of the United States. Nationally, 16.4% of persons under age 65 lacked health care coverage at the time of interview in 2007 (Table 8). Nationally, nearly 1 in 10 children in 2007 lacked coverage at the time of interview, but rates were considerably higher in Arizona (16%) and Texas (15%).
Point estimates and estimates of their variances were calculated using SUDAAN software to account for the complex sample design of NHIS. Due to small sample sizes, estimates based on less than a year of data may have large variances, and caution should be used in analyzing these estimates. The average design effect for each health insurance measure and domain was estimated by averaging the design effect derived from SUDAAN-based estimates of standard errors for the ten largest states. The estimated standard error of the difference between state and national estimates accounted for non-independence of state and national estimates by incorporating their covariance. Data on health insurance status were edited using an automated system based on logic checks and keyword searches. Two additional questions were added to the health insurance section of NHIS beginning with the third quarter of 2004. Respondents who were considered insured at the time of interview were asked about periods of noncoverage in the past year. Of the 892 people (unweighted) who were eligible to receive the MCAREPRB question in the third and fourth quarters of 2004, 55.4% indicated that they were covered by Medicare. In 2007 three additional questions were added to the health insurance section of the NHIS questionnaire.
High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) - A HDHP was defined as a private health plan with an annual deductible of not less than $1,100 for self-only coverage or $2,200 for family coverage. Consumer-Directed Health Plan (CDHP) - A CDHP was defined as a HDHP with a special account to pay for medical expenses; unspent funds are carried over to subsequent years.
The measures of HDHP enrollment, CDHP enrollment and being in a family with a FSA for medical expenses are not mutually exclusive. Education - The categories of education are based on the years of school completed or highest degree obtained for persons aged 18 years and over.
Employment - Employment status is assessed at the time of interview and is obtained for persons aged 18 years and over. Hispanic or Latino origin and race - Hispanic or Latino origin and race are two separate and distinct categories. Poverty status - Poverty categories are based on the ratio of the family's income in the previous calendar year to the appropriate poverty threshold (given the family's size and number of children) defined by the U.S. In the 2007 NHIS, the family income section was redesigned to improve the collection of income information and to reduce the amount of income nonresponse.
Based on results of a pilot test conducted in the second quarter of 2006, the 2007 NHIS income follow-up questions were changed from using a flash card approach to using a set of unfolding brackets. The NCHS Early Release Program will continue updating and releasing estimates of health insurance coverage 6 months after NHIS data collection has been completed for each quarter.
Announcements about Early Releases, other new data releases, publications, or corrections related to NHIS will be sent to members of the HISUSERS Listserv.
1 A person was defined as uninsured if he or she did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), state-sponsored or other government-sponsored health plan, or military plan. 3 Beginning in the third quarter of 2004, two additional questions were added to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) insurance section to reduce potential errors in reporting Medicare and Medicaid status.
From January-June 2008, the percentage of children under the age of 18 years who were uninsured at the time of the interview was 8.4%. Three measures of lack of health insurance coverage are provided: current (uninsured at the time of the interview), intermittent (uninsured at least part of the year prior to the interview, which also includes persons uninsured for more than a year), and long term (uninsured for more than a year at the time of the interview). For individuals with private health insurance, estimates for enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs), enrollment in consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs), and participation in flexible spending account (FSA) arrangements for medical expenses are presented. This report is updated quarterly and is part of the NHIS ER Program, which releases updated selected estimates that are available from the NHIS website.
There was no significant change in the percentage of children or working age adults covered by private or public plans from 2007 to the first 6 months of 2008. Based on data from the January-June 2008 NHIS, Hispanic persons were considerably more likely than non-Hispanic white persons, non-Hispanic black persons, and non-Hispanic Asian persons to be uninsured at the time of interview, to have been uninsured for at least part of the past 12 months, and to have been uninsured for more than a year (Table 7). Seventeen percent of persons 65 years of age and under with employer-based private coverage were enrolled in a HDHP, compared with over 43% enrolled in a HDHP for those with a private plan that was directly purchased or obtained through means other than an employer (Figure 5). Public coverage rates among both children and working-age adults are now significantly higher than in 1997 (Table 3). The percentage of poor children who were uninsured at the time of the interview decreased from 1997 through June 2008 (Figure 8). Among children, all poverty status groups experienced an increase in public coverage between 1997 and the first six months of 2008. The rate of private coverage among near-poor children was 22 percentage points lower in the first 6 months of 2008 than in 1997 (Table 6). The 2008 health insurance estimates are being released prior to final data editing and final weighting to provide access to the most recent information from NHIS. The data for this report are derived from the Family Core component of the 1997-2008 NHIS, which collects information on all family members in each household. Both of the June 2007 Early Release (ER) reports used final in-house design variables for estimating variance for the 2006 estimates. All estimates shown meet the NCHS standard of having less than or equal to 30% relative standard error unless otherwise noted. For persons with private health insurance, a new question regarding the annual deductible of each private health insurance plan was added beginning in 2007. High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) - A HDHP is defined as a private health plan with an annual deductible of not less than $1,100 for self-only coverage or $2,200 for family coverage. Consumer-Directed Health Plan (CDHP) - A CDHP is defined as a HDHP with a special account to pay for medical expenses; unspent funds are carried over to subsequent years. Directly purchased coverage - Private insurance that was originally obtained through direct purchase or through other means not related to employment. Employer-based coverage - Private insurance that was originally obtained through a present or former employer or union or professional association.
See the NHIS Survey Description Documents for 1997-2007 for more information on the unknown income and unknown poverty status categories: available from the NHIS website. Based on preliminary data from the first quarter of 2007, 56% of the respondents eligible for the modified income follow-up questions answered all the questions in the applicable path. Pokemon go showed us that the experience of catching monsters in the real world can be magical, but these ten terrors are a healthy reminder that some pokemon dreams.
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The furor against the college-driven academic standards drives schools to think about their missions. Mackenzie Brown works in an eighth-grade algebra class at Holy Spirit School in East Greenbush, N.Y. Teacher pay for performance: At a glanceThe idea of paying teachers for their performance has once again become popular. We take in data, manage it, store it, share it appropriately, and protect it from unauthorized access. This means developing and leveraging technology to enhance the CFPB’s reach, impact, and effectiveness.
Therefore, we invest in world-class training and support in order to create an environment that encourages employees at all levels to tackle complex challenges. We serve our colleagues by listening to one another and by sharing our collective knowledge and experience.



We believe in investing in the growth of our colleagues and in creating an organization that is accountable to the American people. The result was a system without sufficiently effective rules or consistent enforcement of the law.
The CFPB is designed to be agile and adjust its approach to supervising the financial industry in order to respond rapidly to changing consumer needs. However, beginning with survey year 2007, the imputation procedure will be modified to take into account the changes made to the income section of the questionnaire.
These estimates are included to provide current information for states for which the NHIS sample is large enough to produce statistically reliable estimates. In addition to the continued oversampling of black and Hispanic persons carried out in the NHIS according to the 1995-2005 sample design, persons of Asian descent are also oversampled according to the new sample design.
Questions used to collect income data from respondents who initially would not indicate the amount of their family's income in the last calendar year were changed from using a flash card approach to using a set of unfolding brackets. There was no significant change in the percentage of people under age 65 who were uninsured at the time of the interview between 2006 and 2007. Children were less likely than working-age adults to be uninsured for more than a year (Figure 2).
However, private health care coverage rates among both children and working-age adults are now significantly lower than in 1997. The percentage of poor and near poor children who were uninsured at the time of the interview decreased from 1997 through 2007. However, this was not a significant increase from the 35.6% of poor working-age adults covered by a public plan in 2006 (Table 5).
The observed decreases in private coverage for poor and near poor children from 2006 to 2007 were not significant. Approximately one-third of Hispanic persons were uninsured at the time of interview or had been uninsured for at least part of the past year, and about one-fourth of Hispanic persons had been without health insurance coverage for more than a year. Starting at age 18, younger adults were more likely than older adults to lack health insurance coverage.
However, approximately one in four persons under age 65 in Texas and one in five persons under age 65 in Arizona, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina lacked coverage at the time of interview. Adults aged 18-64 with more than a high school diploma were more likely to be covered by a HDHP, more likely to be covered by a CDHP, and more likely to be in a family with an FSA for medical expenses than those who had only a high school diploma or were not high school graduates (Figure 6). Consumer-directed health plans: Early enrollee experiences with health savings accounts and eligible health plans.
Impact of income bracketing on poverty measures used in the National Health Interview Survey's (NHIS) Early Release Program: Preliminary data from the 2007 NHIS. Early release of selected estimates based on data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Wireless substitution: Early release of estimates based on data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2007.
Impact of Medicare and Medicaid probe questions on health insurance estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2004. The NHIS data weighting procedure has been described in more detail elsewhere (Design and Estimation for the National Health Interview Survey, 1995a€“2004 [PDF - 300 KB]).
The Taylor series linearization method was chosen for estimation of standard errors for the 10 states with the largest sample sizes (California, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas). For this report, standard errors for 10 states were estimated by multiplying the SRS standard error by the average design effect for each health insurance measure and domain. The data on type of health insurance are collected through the HIKIND question "What kind of health insurance or health care coverage does _______ have? One question, MCAREPRB, was asked of persons aged 65 years and over who had not indicated that they had Medicare. For persons who did not have health insurance at the time of interview, a question concerning the length of time since the respondent had coverage was asked. Method 2 estimates are based on responses to three questions (HIKIND, MCAREPRB, and MCAIDPRB).
Of the 9,146 people (unweighted) who were eligible to receive the MCAIDPRB question in the third and fourth quarters of 2004, 3.0% indicated that they were covered by Medicaid. For persons with private health insurance, a new question regarding the annual deductible of each private health insurance plan was added. These accounts are offered by some employers to allow employees to set aside pre-tax dollars of their own money for their use throughout the year to reimburse themselves for their out-of pocket expenses for health care.
Only years completed in a school that advances a person toward an elementary or high school diploma, General Educational Development high school equivalency diploma (GED), college, university, or professional degree are included.
Respondents were first asked to provide their combined family income before taxes from all sources for the previous calendar year in a dollar amount (from $0 up to $999,995).
These questions utilize a series of income intervals, and respondents answering the complete path of questions would answer either 2 or 3 questions. However, beginning with survey year 2007, the imputation procedure will be modified to take into account the changes made to the income section. In addition to this special report focusing on health insurance, the Early Release Program releases estimates for 15 selected measures of health, including lack of health insurance coverage and type of coverage, usual place to go for medical care, obtaining needed medical care, influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, obesity, leisure-time physical activity, current smoking, alcohol consumption, HIV testing, general health status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma (6). Health insurance coverage: Early release of estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2007. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. A person was also defined as uninsured if he or she had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service such as accidents or dental care. Persons aged 65 years and over not reporting Medicare coverage were asked explicitly about Medicare coverage, and persons under 65 years old with no reported coverage were asked explicitly about Medicaid coverage.
The impact of the new sample design on estimates presented in this report is expected to be minimal.
For more information about the NHIS and the Early Release (ER) Program please see the Technical Notes and Additional Early Release Program Products sections of the report. There was no significant change in the percentage of people under age 65 years who were uninsured at the time of the interview between 2007 and the first 6 months of 2008.
The observed decreases in private coverage for poor and near poor children from 2007 to the first 6 months of 2008 were not significant.
Adults aged 25-64 years with more than a high school diploma were more likely to be covered by a HDHP, more likely to be covered by a CDHP, and more likely to be in a family with a FSA for medical expenses than those who had only a high school diploma or were not high school graduates (Figure 4). Conversely, private health care coverage rates among both children and working-age adults are now significantly lower than in 1997. From 1997 to June 2008, the percentage of poor adults who were uninsured remained relatively stable (Figure 9). However, the largest increase was seen among near-poor children (Table 5 and Figure 10) for whom coverage by a public plan more than doubled between 1997 and June 2008. Early release of selected estimates based on data from the January-June 2008 National Health Interview Survey.
Wireless substitution: Early release of estimates based on data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2008. Different time frames are used to measure lack of insurance coverage to reflect different policy-relevant perspectives. Consumer-directed health care enables individuals to have more control over when and how they access care, what types of care they use, and how much they spend on health care services.
NHIS is a multistage probability sample survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Data analyses for the January-June 2008 NHIS were based on 41,520 persons in the Family Core.
ER reports other than the June 2007 update use ER interim design variables to estimate variance. Differences between percentages or rates were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level. For plans considered to be High Deductible Health Plans (HDHPs), a follow-up question was asked regarding special accounts or funds used to pay for medical expenses: a health savings account (HSA) or a Health Reimbursement Account (HRA). These accounts are offered by some employers to allow employees to set aside pre-tax dollars of their own money for their use throughout the year to reimburse themselves for their out-of-pocket expenses for health care. Respondents were first asked to provide their combined family income before taxes from all sources for the previous calendar year in a dollar amount (from $0 to $999,995). Initial evaluations of the distribution of poverty among selected demographic variables in the first quarter of 2007 suggest that poverty estimates are generally comparable to years 2006 and earlier (17). Beginning with survey year 2007, the imputation procedure was modified to take into account the changes made to the income section. Early Release of Estimates Based on Data from the National Health Interview Survey (18) is published quarterly and provides estimates of 15 selected measures of health, including insurance coverage.
Health insurance coverage: Early release of estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2008. The local Catholic diocese announced recently that it will reduce the frequency of the Common Core-aligned tests. But what do we really know about this practice?Special education: At a glanceThe words "special education" can conjure up a lot of stereotypes. The Bureau is developing targeted outreach to groups that face particular challenges, as required by the Dodd-Frank Act. Our aim is to use data purposefully, to analyze and distill data to enable informed decision-making in all internal and external functions.
We strive to be recognized as an innovative, 21st century agency whose approach to technology serves as a model within government. Three types of measures of lack of health insurance coverage are provided: current (uninsured at the time of the interview), intermittent (uninsured at least part of the year prior to the interview, which also includes persons uninsured for more than a year), and long term (uninsured for more than a year at the time of the interview). Occasionally, due to decisions made for the final data editing and weighting, estimates based on preliminary editing procedures may differ by more than 0.3 percentage points.
Each year, the imputed income files are released within a few months after the annual release of NHIS microdata.
In 2007, three additional questions were added to the health insurance section of the NHIS concerning enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs), plans with high deductibles coupled with health savings accounts also known as CDHPs, and being in a family with a flexible spending account (FSA) for medical expenses not otherwise covered.
Because NHIS is conducted throughout the year, yielding a nationally representative sample each week, data can be analyzed weekly or quarterly to monitor health insurance coverage trends. Early Release of Estimates Based on Data from the National Health Interview Survey (5) is published quarterly and provides estimates of 15 selected measures of health including insurance coverage. Between 2006 and 2007 there was no significant difference in the percentage of children or adults ages 18-64 who had been uninsured for more than a year. The observed changes in the percentage of poor and near poor children uninsured at the time of interview from 2006 to 2007 were not significant. The rate of private coverage among near-poor children was approximately 21 percentage points lower in 2007 than in 1997. Among adults in age groups 18-24 years, 25-34 years, 35-44 years, and 45-64 years, men were more likely than women to lack health insurance coverage at the time of interview.
These rates are two to almost four times as high as those for persons with more than a high school education. By contrast, rates of noncoverage at the time of interview in Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania were lower than the national average. Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania all had rates above the national average. The June, 2007 Health Insurance ER used final in-house design variables for estimating variance for the 2006 estimates.
Due to small sample sizes and limitations in the NHIS design, estimated standard errors for other states could be unstable or negatively biased. A small number of persons were covered by both public and private plans and were included in both categories. Education in other schools or home schooling is counted only if the credits are accepted in a regular school system.


Hispanic or Latino origin includes persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central and South American, or Spanish origins. Respondents who did not know or refused to state an amount were then asked if their combined family income in the previous calendar year was $20,000 or more or less than $20,000. The first follow-up income question asks a respondent if the family's income is less than $50,000. The imputed income files are released within a few months after the annual release of NHIS microdata. Estimates of uninsurance for 2004 are calculated without using the additional information from these questions (noted as Method 1) and with the responses to these questions (noted as Method 2). Children were less likely than working-age adults to have been uninsured for more than a year (Figure 1). Based on the January-June 2008 data, 40.1% of poor working-age adults were covered by public coverage. Among poor adults aged 18-64 years, 23.2% were covered by private health insurance from January-June 2008. Among adults in age groups 18-24 years, 25-34 years, and 35-44 years, men were more likely than women to lack health insurance coverage at the time of interview. These rates are two to more than three times as high as those for persons with more than a high school education. The measure of current lack of coverage provides an estimate of persons who at any given time may experience barriers to obtaining needed health care. National attention to consumer-directed health care has increased following the enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (P.L. Occasionally, due to decisions made for the final data editing and weighting, estimates based on preliminary editing procedures may differ by more than 0.3 percentage points from estimates based on final files. The fundamental structure of the new 2006 NHIS sample design is very similar to the previous 1995-2005 NHIS sample design. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the significance of time trends in the percentage of health insurance coverage.
INCLUDE those that pay for only one type of service (nursing home care, accidents, or dental care. Lastly, a new question about enrollment in a flexible spending account (FSA) for medical expenses in the family was added.
Readers should note that as a result of the changes in questions, the 2007 and 2008 poverty ratio variable has fewer missing values compared to prior years. The imputed income files are released a few months after the annual release of NHIS microdata and are not available for the Early Release updates.
Other measures of health include estimates of usual place to go for medical care, obtaining needed medical care, influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, obesity, leisure-time physical activity, current smoking, alcohol consumption, HIV testing, general health status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma. We seek input from and collaborate with consumers, industry, government entities, and other external stakeholders.
The Dodd-Frank Act increased accountability in government by consolidating consumer financial protection authorities that had existed across seven different federal agencies into one, the newly formed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Different timeframes are used to measure lack of insurance coverage to reflect different policy-relevant perspectives. Users should note that these estimates may vary from other state-level estimates, such as those produced by the Current Population Survey (3), because of differences in questions, timing of administration of the questionnaire, and the context and mode of the survey. Currently, studies are being conducted to examine the impact of the redesigned income section.
Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey (6) is published in May and December and provides selected estimates of telephone coverage. From 1997 to 2007, the percentage of poor adults who were uninsured remained relatively stable.
Among children, all poverty groups experienced an increase in public coverage between 1997 and 2007. Among poor adults aged 18-64 years, 25.4% were covered by private health insurance in 2007.
ER reports other than the June, 2007 ER update use ER interim design variables to estimate variance with the exception of the state estimate table (Table 8) which uses final in-house design variables. However, occasionally differences greater than 0.3 percentage points have been observed between preliminary estimates and estimates based on final files. For this report, a decision was made to re-run the 2004 estimates to reflect this editing decision. Estimates for 2004 are presented using Method 2 in the figures and both Method 1 and Method 2 in the tables. Race is based on the family respondent's description of his or her own race background as well as the race background of other family members.
If they again refused to answer or said that they did not know, they were not asked any more questions about their family income. A third Early Release report that examines telephone coverage in the United States is published biannually (7).
Respondents who were reclassified as covered by the additional questions received the appropriate follow up questions concerning periods of noncoverage for insured respondents. Between 2007 and the first 6 months of 2008 there was no significant difference in the percentage of children who had been uninsured for more than a year. However, this was not a significant increase from the 37.0% of poor working-age adults covered by a public plan in 2007 (Table 5).
The estimate of persons who were uninsured at any time in the year prior to interview provides an annual caseload of persons who may experience these barriers. Oversampling of the black and Hispanic populations has been retained, and the new sample design also oversamples the Asian population. The 2004 estimates of coverage by poverty status were recalculated using the final microdata. These questions utilize a series of income intervals, and respondents answering the complete path of questions would answer either two or three questions.
A third report, Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey (19) is published in May and December and provides selected estimates of telephone coverage in the United States. Andrew Cuomo for a€?a total reboota€? of the Common Core after his state became the epicenter of anti-testing sentiment.
These authorities include the ability to issue regulations under more than a dozen Federal consumer financial laws. The measure of current lack of coverage provides an estimate of persons who at any given time may experience barriers to obtaining needed healthcare. State-level estimates are included in this report as an additional source for analysis, allowing users to examine data for these 20 states that are parallel with the national data collected using the same methods.
Initial evaluations of the distribution of poverty among selected demographic variables in the first quarter of 2007 suggest that poverty estimates are generally comparable to years 2006 and earlier (4).
However, the largest increase was seen among near-poor children (Table 5 and Figure 3) for whom coverage by a public plan more than doubled between 1997 and 2007. The weights for the 1997-1999 NHIS data were derived from 1990-census-based population estimates. For this report the design effect is taken as the ratio of the true standard error of an estimated percentage (taking the complex sample design into account) to the standard error of the estimated percentage from a simple random sample (SRS) based on the same number of persons. Estimates impacted by this decision are found in those tables that present estimates stratified by poverty (Tables 4, 5, and 6).
Additional information on the impact of these two probe questions on health insurance estimates can be found in Impact of Medicare and Medicaid probe questions on health insurance estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2004 (7). For conciseness, the text, tables, and figures in this report use shorter versions of the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) race and Hispanic or Latino origin terms. These reclassified respondents were excluded in the tabulation of uninsured for more than a year using Method 1 in 2004.
In 2007 and the first 6 months of 2008 the percentage of adults aged 18-64 years who had been uninsured for more than a year was 14.3%. This measure includes persons who have insurance at the time of interview, but had a period of noncoverage in the year prior to the interview, as well as those who are currently uninsured and who may have had been uninsured for a long period of time. In 2007, three additional questions were added to the health insurance section of the NHIS to monitor enrollment in consumer-directed health care among persons with private health insurance. Additional information on the impact of these two probe questions on health insurance estimates can be found in Impact of Medicare and Medicaid probe questions on health insurance estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2004 (3). The revised estimates were released in the March 2006 ER update, and continue to be used in subsequent ER updates. Married or widowed adults were more likely to have coverage than those who were divorced, separated, living with a partner, or never married.
Weights for the 2000-2007 NHIS data were derived from 2000-census-based population estimates. The analyses excluded persons with unknown health insurance status (about 1% of respondents each year). The estimates primarily impacted were those for poor persons and may differ from those released in previous reports.
As a result, these respondents did not receive the followup question concerning how long had it been since they had coverage. See the NHIS Survey Description Documents for 1997-2006 for more information on the unknown income and unknown poverty status categories. Thus, NHIS respondents fell into one of four categories with respect to combined family income information: those willing to supply a dollar amount, those who indicated their combined family income from a fairly detailed set of intervals (approximately 65%), those who said that their combined family income was either $20,000 or more or less than $20,000, and those unwilling to provide any information whatsoever. Finally, the measure of lack of coverage for more than a year provides an estimate of those with a persistent lack of coverage who may be at high risk of not obtaining preventive services as well as care for illness and injury. Weights for the 2000-2008 NHIS data were derived from 2000-census-based population estimates. Lack of comments regarding the difference between any two estimates does not necessarily mean that the difference was tested and found to be not significant.
Can they be used appropriately?A guide to standardized testing: The nature of assessmentThis guide provides useful information about testing and assessment for practitioners and non-practitioners who care about public schools.
With the consolidation of existing and new authorities under one roof, the CFPB is now focused and equipped to prevent financial harm to consumers while promoting practices that benefit consumers across financial institutions. This measure includes persons who have insurance at the time of interview, but had a period of noncoverage in the year prior to the interview, as well as those who are currently uninsured who may have had been uninsured for a long period of time. Readers should note that as a result of the changes in questions, the 2007 poverty ratio variable has fewer missing values compared to prior years.
However, they were asked the questions concerning noncoverage in the past 12 months for insured persons.
However the flash card approach had a very low item response rate (15-18%) and this led to income variables such as poverty ratio having relatively high levels of missing data (approximately 30% item nonresponse rate). These three measures of lack of coverage are not mutually exclusive, and a given individual may be counted in more than one of the three measures. All estimates beginning in 2005 are calculated using the two additional questions (Method 2).
A more complete analysis of the impact of bracketing on poverty measures is published elsewhere (5). A description of the pilot test used to develop these new questions is available elsewhere (16).
Readers should note that as a result of the changes in income questions the 2007 poverty ratio variable has fewer missing values compared with prior years.



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